What works best for grass allergies

In many cases, the most effective way of managing an allergy is to avoid the allergen that causes the reaction whenever possible.

For example, if you own a food allergy, you should check a food’s ingredients list for allergens before eating it.

There are also several medicines available to help control symptoms of allergic reactions, including:

  1. lotions and creams, such as moisturising creams (emollients) – these can reduce skin redness and itchiness
  2. antihistamines – these can be taken when you notice the symptoms of a reaction, or before being exposed to an allergen, to stop a reaction occurring
  3. decongestants – tablets, capsules, nasal sprays or liquids that can be used as a short-term treatment for a blocked nose
  4. steroid medicines – sprays, drops, creams, inhalers and tablets that can assist reduce redness and swelling caused by an allergic reaction

For some people with extremely severe allergies, a treatment called immunotherapy may be recommended.

This involves being exposed to the allergen in a controlled way over a number of years so your body gets used to it and does not react to it so severely.


Is it an allergy, sensitivity or intolerance?

Intolerance

Where a substance causes unpleasant symptoms, such as diarrhoea, but does not involve the immune system.

People with an intolerance to certain foods can typically eat a little quantity without having any problems.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

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Allergy

A reaction produced by the body’s immune system when exposed to a normally harmless substance.

Pollen forecasts

Modelling in aerobiology makes pollination forecasts based on data of the previous years and on the weather forecasts of the days to come.

What works best for grass allergies

These forecasts are not based on data recorded previous days/weeks. Modelling allows to get an overview of what to expect for the days to come, even if these forecasts are not 100% dependable.

What works best for grass allergies

The following links are only for guidance:

Alder pollination

Sensitivity

The exaggeration of the normal effects of a substance. For example, the caffeine in a cup of coffee may cause extreme symptoms, such as palpitations and trembling.

Smartphone Apps

— The Alerte pollens app will assist you to live your allergy without staying at home! Consult the RNSA pollen alerts, advices to handle your allergy day by day and services love weather forecast or air quality. You can configure up to 5 pollens and 5 departments.

What works best for grass allergies

You can also activate the geolocation which will assist to automatically display informations about the area you travel. Available on Frolic store and Apple store.

— The Pollen app, now available for France, provide a personnal pollen forecast for the 3 days to come in your area, taking into account your informations from the pollen diary and calculate your personnal level of exposure. Symptôms of allergy can be recorded and compared with the pollination in the pollen diary. Available on Frolic et l'App Store.

It’s a excellent thought to hold an eye on the predicted pollen counts, particularly if you plan to be outdoors for a endless period of time.

(If you are planning to be exterior working around plants or cutting grass, a dust mask can help.)

But even if you see a high pollen count predicted in the newspaper, on a smartphone app or on TV, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will be affected. There are numerous types of pollen — from diverse kinds of trees, from grass and from a variety of weeds. As a result, a high overall pollen count doesn’t always indicate a strong concentration of the specific pollen to which you’re allergic.

The opposite can be true, too: The pollen count might be low, but you might discover yourself around one of the pollens that triggers your allergies.

Through testing, an allergist can pinpoint which pollens bring on your symptoms.

An allergist can also assist you discover relief by determining which medications will work best for your set of triggers.

This sheet was reviewed for accuracy 4/23/2018.

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Symptoms of an allergic reaction

Allergic reactions generally happen quickly within a few minutes of exposure to an allergen.

They can cause:

  1. wheezing and coughing
  2. sneezing
  3. a red, itchy rash
  4. a runny or blocked nose
  5. red, itchy, watery eyes
  6. worsening of asthma or eczema symptoms

Most allergic reactions are mild, but occasionally a severe reaction called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock can happen.

This is a medical emergency and needs urgent treatment.


What causes allergies?

Allergies occur when the body’s immune system reacts to a specific substance as though it’s harmful.

It’s not clear why this happens, but most people affected own a family history of allergies or own closely related conditions, such as asthma or eczema.

The number of people with allergies is increasing every year.

The reasons for this are not understood, but 1 of the main theories is it’s the result of living in a cleaner, germ-free environment, which reduces the number of germs our immune system has to deal with.

It’s thought this may cause it to overreact when it comes into contact with harmless substances.


Overview

An allergy (allergic rhinitis) that occurs in a specific season is more commonly known as hay fever.

About 8 percent of Americans experience it, reports the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Hay fever occurs when your immune system overreacts to an outdoor allergen, such as pollen. An allergen is something that triggers an allergic response.

What works best for grass allergies

The most common allergens are pollens from wind-pollenated plants, such as trees, grasses, and weeds. The pollens from insect-pollinated plants are too heavy to remain airborne for endless, and they’re less likely to trigger an allergic reaction.

Hay fever comes by its name from hay-cutting season.

What works best for grass allergies

Historically, this activity occurred in the summer months, around the same time numerous people experienced symptoms.

Seasonal allergies are less common during the winter, but it’s possible to experience allergic rhinitis year-round. Diverse plants emit their respective pollens at diverse times of year. Depending on your allergy triggers and where you live, you may experience hay fever in more than one season. You may also react to indoor allergens, such as mold or pet dander.


Common allergies

Substances that cause allergic reactions are called allergens.

What works best for grass allergies

The more common allergens include:

  1. medicines – including ibuprofen, aspirin and certain antibiotics
  2. grass and tree pollen – an allergy to these is known as hay fever (allergic rhinitis)
  3. latex – used to make some gloves and condoms
  4. dust mites
  5. food – particularly nuts, fruit, shellfish, eggs and cows’ milk
  6. animal dander, tiny flakes of skin or hair
  7. insect bites and stings
  8. mould – these can release little particles into the air that you can breathe in
  9. household chemicals – including those in detergents and hair dyes

Most of these allergens are generally harmless to people who are not allergic to them.


Getting assist for allergies

See a GP if you ponder you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something.

The symptoms of an allergic reaction can also be caused by other conditions.

A GP can assist determine whether it’s likely you own an allergy.

If they ponder you might own a mild allergy, they can offer advice and treatment to assist manage the condition.

If your allergy is particularly severe or it’s not clear what you’re allergic to, they may refer you to an allergy specialist for testing and advice about treatment.

Find out more about allergy testing


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What works best for grass allergies