What type of carpet is best for allergies

What type of carpet is best for allergies

Steam vs. Chemical — What’s The Best Way To Clean Carpeting

Several times a week we are asked » We own allergies. What is the best way to clean carpets»

Carpet cleaning – the best way to clean carpeting, steam or chemical, is an ongoing debate. There are numerous proponents and critics of each method so the only way to make the correct choice for your home is to investigate both methods and discover out what they own to offer. Then you can make an informed decision as to the best way to clean your carpets.

Steam cleaning is also known as deep cleaning. That’s because it is the only carpet cleaning method known to remove at least 97 percent of dirt and bacteria from carpeting.

It is also the only method that reaches every the way below to the lowest layer, or “pile”, of your carpeting to clean it thoroughly. This makes it the best method for dealing with the ground in or hard stains.

When it comes to carpet cleaning, the ability to deep clean is just one consideration. Since steam cleaning uses water heated to a extremely high temperature, it can take far longer for the carpet to dry after treatment.

Depending on how excellent the cleaner’s extraction system is and how thick the carpet is, it can take 45 minutes to several hours. In some cases, we own seen where carpets were still damp the next day and that creates a whole other set of problems.

If you need access to your room quickly, then you might desire to consider using another method of cleaning.

As the name suggests, chemical cleaning involves the use of a chemical solution to remove dirt from your carpet. Some of these solutions are called “dry” shampoos, although that term is used lightly.

They are not, in fact, completely dry but they do use significantly less water than steam cleaning. This means that carpets that are chemically cleaned generally dry much faster as there is less moisture to evaporate once cleaning is done.

As with steam cleaning, drying time is not the only consideration to take into effect when considering the subject of carpet cleaning.

Because chemical solutions only work in the top layers of carpet, they are almost completely ineffective for treating deep stains. Also, there is a tendency for some chemical residue to be left behind in your carpet, meaning you and your family can be exposed to these chemicals.

Make certain you fully understand what chemicals they are using.

For individuals who are concerned about chemical exposure, steam cleaning may be a better option

The method you select depends on your specific needs and your concerns if any about using chemicals.

Arguments can be made for both sides, steam or chemical, the cost can vary as well, so that’s another factor you’ll need to take into consideration.

Either way, if you select a dependable product or service you can be certain of getting excellent results. Enquire your friends and neighbors who they use. That is the best way to discover a carpet cleaner.

The carpet cleaner we use here at the office uses a steam process and environmentally friendly cleaning solutions. When he is done not only does the carpet glance excellent he can tell you how much water he used and how much he recovered.

For light cleaning, we will use our Vapamore MR Primo steam cleaner. It works grand for little areas but we don’t recommend you attempt to do a large carpeted area.

With that being said nothing cleans tile better than steam and it is how we clean the tile in our home.

Your carpet can make a strong first impression of your home or office, so make certain you treat it correct and hold it clean.

What type of carpet is best for allergies

Do your research and discover out whether steam or chemical cleaning is the correct choice for you. Also, check with your neighbors and friends to see what method and company they own used. In the finish, you’ll be capable to enjoy clean carpets and that’s what excellent carpet cleaning is every about.

Wishing you the best of health

Allergy elimination is about eliminating the allergy-causing substance in your home the best you can. Once you do this, you may be capable to eliminate the need for every the medications and doctor visits.

For additional information please click here to download your free copy of» You Can Do It! Allergy Free Living.

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It can be terribly upsetting to study that your kid is allergic to your family pet — but it’s not unusual. Up to 30 percent of people with allergies own allergic reactions to cats and dogs, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA).

Contrary to favorite belief, it’s not the pets’ hair that makes a kid sneeze and wheeze. It’s the proteins found in their urine, saliva, or pet dander, according to the AAFA.

The proteins can stick to surfaces of walls, furniture, and clothing and stay there, at full strength, for a endless time. A pet also can bring other allergens, such as pollen, into your home.

“The first law of allergies is, if you’re allergic to something, stay away from it,” says Mark Holbreich, MD, an allergist and immunologist with Allergy and Asthma Consultants in Indianapolis. When it’s your pet, though, that’s hard to do. But if the allergies are severe, says the American Academy of Pediatrics, you may own to discover your pet a new home.

Symptoms of children’s pet allergies include a stuffy nose, itchy, watery eyes, and wheezing.

Some people can own an asthma attack if their allergies flare, the AAFA says. If your kid experiences these symptoms after coming in contact with your dog or cat, own your kid tested.

“Testing is extremely important,” says Mervat Nassef, MD, a pediatric allergist and immunologist at NewYork-Presbyterian in New York City. If you might own to give up your pet, you desire to be certain that your kid isn’t allergic to something else.

“Other allergies can give you similar symptoms,” Dr. Nassef says.

It’s also significant to note that some animals may be more allergy-friendly than others.

What type of carpet is best for allergies

However, there’s no such thing as a hypoallergenic cat or dog, according to the American College of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology. “Small dogs that don’t shed produce less dander, but your kid still can be allergic to them,” Dr. Holbreich says.


Strategies to Reduce Pet Allergies

If your child’s allergies aren’t too severe, you may be capable to take some steps to reduce your child’s symptoms and hold your pet. For instance:

Keep pets out of the bedroom. Make your child’s room a pet-free zone and be certain to hold it clean.

To hold the room pet dander- and pollen-free, install a high-efficiency air filter and air purifier. Remember to change the filters frequently.

Cover your child’s bed with additional protection. You can purchase dust mite covers for your child’s pillow, blanket, and mattress. This will also assist hold out dust mites, another potential allergy trigger, in addition to allergens love pet dander.

Go for hard surfaces. Where you can, replace upholstered surfaces with non-fabric or easily washable materials.

Pet dander sticks to upholstery, drapes, curtains, and carpeting more easily than it does to surfaces such as wood, vinyl, or tile. Plus, the latter are easier to clean. For this reason, you also shouldn’t let your allergic kid sleep with stuffed animals, Dr. Nassef adds. If you must own carpet in your child’s bedroom or elsewhere in your home, select a low-pile one and own it steam-cleaned regularly.

Bathe your pet weekly. Weekly baths can significantly reduce the quantity of allergy-causing dander your pet sheds.

If possible, enquire a non-allergic member of your household to bathe the pet and be certain to wash that person’s clothes afterward. Wearing gloves may also assist. Enquire your veterinarian to recommend the best soaps and shampoos. Caution: Bathing too frequently can own the opposite effect. It can dry your pet’s skin and cause the animal to shed more dander.

Teach your kid to wash his hands with soap and water after touching the pet. Washing helps prevent the spread of allergens to your child’s nose, eyes, and mouth — which is especially significant if your kid gets a rash from having been licked by your pet, Nassef says.

Talk to your allergist about treatment.

“Medications work for allergy symptoms regardless of the trigger — pollen, pet dander, etc.,” Nassef says.

What type of carpet is best for allergies

“But not every medications work equally well for every symptoms.” That’s why it’s significant to work with your doctor and tailor your child’s allergy medications to his or her symptoms.

Consult your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can recommend a diet for your pet that’s wealthy in vitamins and minerals, which can assist your pet’s skin retain its moisture and not shed as much. Love people, pets can benefit from omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, according to the Partnership for Animal Welfare in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Every family has to decide for themselves whether they can manage their children’s pet allergies with a cat or dog, Nassef says.

“The best solution for pet allergies is to not own a pet,» she says, «but numerous people consider pets part of their family and getting rid of the pet is out of the question.”

Last Updated:8/7/

There’s nothing nicer after a endless day than snuggling up with the perfect pillow that envelops your head in comfort. But you know who else loves pillows? Dust mites.

To a dust mite, your pillow is heaven, filled with the tasty dead skin cells that they love to feast upon. And one of a dust mite’s favourite season is correct about now: spring and summer, because the only thing dust mites love more than skin cells, is heat and humidity.

You’ve probably never seen a dust mite; they are mostly invisible to the naked eye and hundreds of them can live in just one gram of dust.

They are found wherever there’s dust — which is to tell, beautiful much every over the home, but they hide extremely nicely in carpeting and upholstered furniture and thrive in warm environments such as bedding, which tend to trap heat and humidity.

While dust mites sound disgusting, they don’t bite and don’t carry disease. For the most part, they are as harmless as any of the other microbes we own on our skin and in our bellies. But the tiny little feces of dust mites contain an allergen that can set off asthma or sinus problems in those with dust allergies.

DUST MITE ALLERGIES

According to the Asthma Society of Canada, one in five Canadians has respiratory allergies that cause something called “perennial allergic rhinitis”: year-round runny nose and sniffles typically caused by an allergy to dust mites, pet dander, or mould.

The rate is even higher among those with asthma; 75 to 80 per cent of them also suffer from allergic rhinitis.

Dust mites can infest every kinds of pillows — feather, below, microfiber, or polyester foam. That means notone type is immune to them.

The Asthma Society recommends that those diagnosed with dust mite allergies should invest in mite-proof pillow and mattress covers, which are made of a fabric similar to typewriter ribbon with a tight weave that does not permit mites to penetrate.

But a study a few years ago by the non-profit Cochrane Review found that the covers may not do much.

The review looked at 54 studies involving 3, asthma patients and found that no physical intervention was effective at reducing dust mite exposure. They found that the level of allergens is so high in most homes that what remains even after the use of mite-proof protectors is still high enough to cause allergic reactions.

Noah Farber, the director of public affairs at the Asthma Society of Canada, says it’s not possible to avoid allergens per cent.

“So we urge our patient community to do everything you can to minimize exposure to triggers,” he told

He says the protectors create a barrier to hold ancient mites in, and stop new mites from getting in.

“They are certainly not the only solution but they can be a contributing factor to helping to reduce allergens,” he said.

Farber adds his group advises those with asthma and dust mite allergies to replace their pillow every five years and their mattresses every 10 years, and use air purifiers where they can.

WHAT ABOUT THE Relax OF US?

So do the four in five of us without dust allergies need to worry about dust mites?

Probably not, but that doesn’t mean we don’t still need to periodically replace our pillows.

Christine Magee of Sleep Country Canada told CTV’s Canada AM not endless ago that there is no hard and quick law about when to throw your pillow. Generally, if you’re consistently waking up with a sore neck, or having a tough time moulding the pillow around you the way you love, it’s time to get a new one.

Another way to decide if your pillow is beyond help: fold it in half, and if it doesn’t spring back into shape within 30 seconds — even after it’s been washed and dried — it should be replaced.

WASH PILLOWS OFTEN

Yes, you can wash pillows and yes, you should.

Throw them into the laundry at least two or three times a year to get rid of dust, sweat and saliva stains — more often if you suffer from dust allergies.

There are lots of guides on washing pillows, including this one from the maven of housekeeping Martha Stewart, but essentially, a little detergent and Borax to neutralize sweat smells is every you need. Almost every pillows except foam ones can go in the wash. Just be certain they are fully dried to eliminate every leftover moisture.

Since foam pellet and solid foam pillows cannot go in the dryer, they should be regularly vacuumed orperiodically replaced.

WASH THE OTHER STUFF TOO

Duvets and comforters should also be washed a few times a year too to get rid of dust mites, and yes, even down-filled duvets can go in the wash (check the care label to be sure).

Because they are heavy, it’s best to go a laundromat and use the large-capacity washers there. Same goes for king-size comforters, which are probably too large for a home washer, tell housekeeping experts.

If you suspect you own dust allergies, the Asthma Society of Canada recommends washing sheets, pillowcases, and mattress protectors every single week, because dust mites multiply in just a matter of days. Dry the bed linens in a boiling dryer, instead of on a clothesline, because while air-drying saves money, the linens can pick up pollen, which numerous with dust allergies are also allergic to.

OTHER TIPS TO REDUCE DUST MITES

The Asthma Society of Canada offers a few more tips for minimizing dust mites:

  1. Dust and mop floors frequently.
  2. Avoid humidifiers in the winter.

    Yes, extremely dry air can dry out nasal passages, but humidity levels should be kept under 50 per cent since dust mites can’t survive in dry environments.

  3. If carpet removal is not possible, vacuum at least once a week and invest in regular steam-cleaning to kill mites
  4. Remove carpets, especially in the bedroom, since it’s hard to remove every mites with just vacuuming.
  5. Use air conditioning in the summer to reduce humidity and mite growth.
  6. Keep clutter in the bedroom to a minimum to reduce dust accumulation.

    That means move bookcases out and get rid of knick knacks; they’re just dust magnets.

  7. Skip regular duct cleaning because the Asthma Society says there is no evidence it reduces household concentrations of dust mites.


Strategies to Reduce Pet Allergies

If your child’s allergies aren’t too severe, you may be capable to take some steps to reduce your child’s symptoms and hold your pet. For instance:

Keep pets out of the bedroom. Make your child’s room a pet-free zone and be certain to hold it clean.

To hold the room pet dander- and pollen-free, install a high-efficiency air filter and air purifier. Remember to change the filters frequently.

Cover your child’s bed with additional protection. You can purchase dust mite covers for your child’s pillow, blanket, and mattress. This will also assist hold out dust mites, another potential allergy trigger, in addition to allergens love pet dander.

Go for hard surfaces.

Where you can, replace upholstered surfaces with non-fabric or easily washable materials. Pet dander sticks to upholstery, drapes, curtains, and carpeting more easily than it does to surfaces such as wood, vinyl, or tile. Plus, the latter are easier to clean. For this reason, you also shouldn’t let your allergic kid sleep with stuffed animals, Dr. Nassef adds. If you must own carpet in your child’s bedroom or elsewhere in your home, select a low-pile one and own it steam-cleaned regularly.

Bathe your pet weekly. Weekly baths can significantly reduce the quantity of allergy-causing dander your pet sheds.

If possible, enquire a non-allergic member of your household to bathe the pet and be certain to wash that person’s clothes afterward. Wearing gloves may also assist. Enquire your veterinarian to recommend the best soaps and shampoos. Caution: Bathing too frequently can own the opposite effect. It can dry your pet’s skin and cause the animal to shed more dander.

Teach your kid to wash his hands with soap and water after touching the pet. Washing helps prevent the spread of allergens to your child’s nose, eyes, and mouth — which is especially significant if your kid gets a rash from having been licked by your pet, Nassef says.

Talk to your allergist about treatment.

What type of carpet is best for allergies

“Medications work for allergy symptoms regardless of the trigger — pollen, pet dander, etc.,” Nassef says. “But not every medications work equally well for every symptoms.” That’s why it’s significant to work with your doctor and tailor your child’s allergy medications to his or her symptoms.

Consult your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can recommend a diet for your pet that’s wealthy in vitamins and minerals, which can assist your pet’s skin retain its moisture and not shed as much. Love people, pets can benefit from omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, according to the Partnership for Animal Welfare in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Every family has to decide for themselves whether they can manage their children’s pet allergies with a cat or dog, Nassef says.

“The best solution for pet allergies is to not own a pet,» she says, «but numerous people consider pets part of their family and getting rid of the pet is out of the question.”

Last Updated:8/7/

There’s nothing nicer after a endless day than snuggling up with the perfect pillow that envelops your head in comfort. But you know who else loves pillows? Dust mites.

To a dust mite, your pillow is heaven, filled with the tasty dead skin cells that they love to feast upon.

And one of a dust mite’s favourite season is correct about now: spring and summer, because the only thing dust mites love more than skin cells, is heat and humidity.

You’ve probably never seen a dust mite; they are mostly invisible to the naked eye and hundreds of them can live in just one gram of dust. They are found wherever there’s dust — which is to tell, beautiful much every over the home, but they hide extremely nicely in carpeting and upholstered furniture and thrive in warm environments such as bedding, which tend to trap heat and humidity.

While dust mites sound disgusting, they don’t bite and don’t carry disease.

For the most part, they are as harmless as any of the other microbes we own on our skin and in our bellies. But the tiny little feces of dust mites contain an allergen that can set off asthma or sinus problems in those with dust allergies.

DUST MITE ALLERGIES

According to the Asthma Society of Canada, one in five Canadians has respiratory allergies that cause something called “perennial allergic rhinitis”: year-round runny nose and sniffles typically caused by an allergy to dust mites, pet dander, or mould. The rate is even higher among those with asthma; 75 to 80 per cent of them also suffer from allergic rhinitis.

Dust mites can infest every kinds of pillows — feather, below, microfiber, or polyester foam.

That means notone type is immune to them.

The Asthma Society recommends that those diagnosed with dust mite allergies should invest in mite-proof pillow and mattress covers, which are made of a fabric similar to typewriter ribbon with a tight weave that does not permit mites to penetrate.

But a study a few years ago by the non-profit Cochrane Review found that the covers may not do much. The review looked at 54 studies involving 3, asthma patients and found that no physical intervention was effective at reducing dust mite exposure. They found that the level of allergens is so high in most homes that what remains even after the use of mite-proof protectors is still high enough to cause allergic reactions.

Noah Farber, the director of public affairs at the Asthma Society of Canada, says it’s not possible to avoid allergens per cent.

“So we urge our patient community to do everything you can to minimize exposure to triggers,” he told

He says the protectors create a barrier to hold ancient mites in, and stop new mites from getting in.

“They are certainly not the only solution but they can be a contributing factor to helping to reduce allergens,” he said.

Farber adds his group advises those with asthma and dust mite allergies to replace their pillow every five years and their mattresses every 10 years, and use air purifiers where they can.

WHAT ABOUT THE Relax OF US?

So do the four in five of us without dust allergies need to worry about dust mites?

Probably not, but that doesn’t mean we don’t still need to periodically replace our pillows.

Christine Magee of Sleep Country Canada told CTV’s Canada AM not endless ago that there is no hard and quick law about when to throw your pillow. Generally, if you’re consistently waking up with a sore neck, or having a tough time moulding the pillow around you the way you love, it’s time to get a new one.

Another way to decide if your pillow is beyond help: fold it in half, and if it doesn’t spring back into shape within 30 seconds — even after it’s been washed and dried — it should be replaced.

WASH PILLOWS OFTEN

Yes, you can wash pillows and yes, you should.

Throw them into the laundry at least two or three times a year to get rid of dust, sweat and saliva stains — more often if you suffer from dust allergies.

There are lots of guides on washing pillows, including this one from the maven of housekeeping Martha Stewart, but essentially, a little detergent and Borax to neutralize sweat smells is every you need. Almost every pillows except foam ones can go in the wash. Just be certain they are fully dried to eliminate every leftover moisture.

Since foam pellet and solid foam pillows cannot go in the dryer, they should be regularly vacuumed orperiodically replaced.

WASH THE OTHER STUFF TOO

Duvets and comforters should also be washed a few times a year too to get rid of dust mites, and yes, even down-filled duvets can go in the wash (check the care label to be sure).

Because they are heavy, it’s best to go a laundromat and use the large-capacity washers there. Same goes for king-size comforters, which are probably too large for a home washer, tell housekeeping experts.

If you suspect you own dust allergies, the Asthma Society of Canada recommends washing sheets, pillowcases, and mattress protectors every single week, because dust mites multiply in just a matter of days. Dry the bed linens in a boiling dryer, instead of on a clothesline, because while air-drying saves money, the linens can pick up pollen, which numerous with dust allergies are also allergic to.

OTHER TIPS TO REDUCE DUST MITES

The Asthma Society of Canada offers a few more tips for minimizing dust mites:

  1. Dust and mop floors frequently.
  2. Avoid humidifiers in the winter.

    Yes, extremely dry air can dry out nasal passages, but humidity levels should be kept under 50 per cent since dust mites can’t survive in dry environments.

  3. If carpet removal is not possible, vacuum at least once a week and invest in regular steam-cleaning to kill mites
  4. Remove carpets, especially in the bedroom, since it’s hard to remove every mites with just vacuuming.
  5. Use air conditioning in the summer to reduce humidity and mite growth.
  6. Keep clutter in the bedroom to a minimum to reduce dust accumulation.

    That means move bookcases out and get rid of knick knacks; they’re just dust magnets.

  7. Skip regular duct cleaning because the Asthma Society says there is no evidence it reduces household concentrations of dust mites.


Avoidance

The first approach in managing seasonal or perennial forms of hay fever should be to avoid the allergens that trigger symptoms.

Outdoor exposure

  1. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  2. Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  3. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  4. Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  5. Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  6. Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.

Indoor exposure

  1. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom.

    Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs. Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least degrees Fahrenheit).

  2. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.
  3. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets

  1. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  2. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible. If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.
  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling. Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

Medications

Many allergens that trigger allergic rhinitis are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them.

If your symptoms can’t be well-controlled by simply avoiding triggers, your allergist may recommend medications that reduce nasal congestion, sneezing, and an itchy and runny nose. They are available in numerous forms — oral tablets, liquid medication, nasal sprays and eyedrops. Some medications may own side effects, so discuss these treatments with your allergist so they can assist you live the life you want.

Decongestants

Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue. They do not contain antihistamines, so they do not cause antihistaminic side effects. They do not relieve other symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Oral decongestants are available as prescription and nonprescription medications and are often found in combination with antihistamines or other medications.

It is not unusual for patients using decongestants to experience insomnia if they take the medication in the afternoon or evening. If this occurs, a dose reduction may be needed. At times, men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on decongestants. Patients using medications to manage emotional or behavioral problems should discuss this with their allergist before using decongestants. Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease should check with their allergist before using. Pregnant patients should also check with their allergist before starting decongestants.

Nonprescription decongestant nasal sprays work within minutes and final for hours, but you should not use them for more than a few days at a time unless instructed by your allergist.

Prolonged use can cause rhinitis medicamentosa, or rebound swelling of the nasal tissue. Stopping the use of the decongestant nasal spray will cure that swelling, provided that there is no underlying disorder.

Oral decongestants are found in numerous over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, and may be the treatment of choice for nasal congestion. They don’t cause rhinitis medicamentosa but need to be avoided by some patients with high blood pressure. If you own high blood pressure or heart problems, check with your allergist before using them.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications or who experience side effects from medications, who own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or who desire a more permanent solution to their allergies.

Immunotherapy can be extremely effective in controlling allergic symptoms, but it doesn’t assist the symptoms produced by nonallergic rhinitis.

Two types of immunotherapy are available: allergy shots and sublingual (under-the-tongue) tablets.

  1. Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached. Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish.

    As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  2. Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily. Treatment can continue for as endless as three years. Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis. These medications counter the effects of histamine, the irritating chemical released within your body when an allergic reaction takes put.

Although other chemicals are involved, histamine is primarily responsible for causing the symptoms.

What type of carpet is best for allergies

Antihistamines are found in eyedrops, nasal sprays and, most commonly, oral tablets and syrup.

Antihistamines assist to relieve nasal allergy symptoms such as:

  1. Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  2. Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  3. Itchy skin, hives and eczema

There are dozens of antihistamines; some are available over the counter, while others require a prescription. Patients reply to them in a wide variety of ways.

Generally, the newer (second-generation) products work well and produce only minor side effects. Some people discover that an antihistamine becomes less effective as the allergy season worsens or as their allergies change over time.

If you discover that an antihistamine is becoming less effective, tell your allergist, who may recommend a diverse type or strength of antihistamine. If you own excessive nasal dryness or thick nasal mucus, consult an allergist before taking antihistamines. Contact your allergist for advice if an antihistamine causes drowsiness or other side effects.

Proper use: Short-acting antihistamines can be taken every four to six hours, while timed-release antihistamines are taken every 12 to 24 hours. The short-acting antihistamines are often most helpful if taken 30 minutes before an anticipated exposure to an allergen (such as at a picnic during ragweed season).

Timed-release antihistamines are better suited to long-term use for those who need daily medications. Proper use of these drugs is just as significant as their selection. The most effective way to use them is before symptoms develop. A dose taken early can eliminate the need for numerous later doses to reduce established symptoms. Numerous times a patient will tell that he or she “took one, and it didn’t work.” If the patient had taken the antihistamine regularly for three to four days to build up blood levels of the medication, it might own been effective.

Side effects: Older (first-generation) antihistamines may cause drowsiness or performance impairment, which can lead to accidents and personal injury.

Even when these medications are taken only at bedtime, they can still cause considerable impairment the following day, even in people who do not feel drowsy. For this reason, it is significant that you do not drive a car or work with dangerous machinery when you take a potentially sedating antihistamine. Some of the newer antihistamines do not cause drowsiness.

A frequent side effect is excessive dryness of the mouth, nose and eyes. Less common side effects include restlessness, nervousness, overexcitability, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, euphoria, fainting, visual disturbances, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distress, constipation, diarrhea, increased or decreased urination, urinary retention, high or low blood pressure, nightmares (especially in children), sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, chest tightness or palpitations.

Men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on antihistamines. Consult your allergist if these reactions occur.

Important precautions:

  1. Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  2. While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  3. Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  4. Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  5. Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy.

    Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.

  6. Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  7. Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  8. Never take anyone else’s medication.

Intranasal corticosteroids

Intranasal corticosteroids are the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis. They can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Ask your allergist about whether these medications are appropriate and safe for you.

These sprays are designed to avoid the side effects that may happen from steroids that are taken by mouth or injection. Take care not to spray the medication against the middle portion of the nose (the nasal septum). The most common side effects are local irritation and nasal bleeding. Some older preparations own been shown to own some effect on children’s growth; data about some newer steroids don’t indicate an effect on growth.

Leukatriene pathway inhibitors

Leukotriene pathway inhibitors (montelukast, zafirlukast and zileuton) block the action of leukotriene, a substance in the body that can cause symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

These drugs are also used to treat asthma.

Nasal sprays

Nonprescription saline nasal sprays will assist counteract symptoms such as dry nasal passages or thick nasal mucus. Unlike decongestant nasal sprays, a saline nasal spray can be used as often as it is needed. Sometimes an allergist may recommend washing (douching) the nasal passage. There are numerous OTC delivery systems for saline rinses, including neti pots and saline rinse bottles.

Nasal cromolyn blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances.

It does not work in every patients. The full dose is four times daily, and improvement of symptoms may take several weeks. Nasal cromolyn can assist prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure.

Nasal ipratropium bromide spray can assist reduce nasal drainage from allergic rhinitis or some forms of nonallergic rhinitis.

Eye allergy preparations and eyedrops

Eye allergy preparations may be helpful when the eyes are affected by the same allergens that trigger rhinitis, causing redness, swelling, watery eyes and itching.

OTC eyedrops and oral medications are commonly used for short-term relief of some eye allergy symptoms. They may not relieve every symptoms, though, and prolonged use of some of these drops may actually cause your condition to worsen.

Prescription eyedrops and oral medications also are used to treat eye allergies. Prescription eyedrops provide both short- and long-term targeted relief of eye allergy symptoms, and can be used to manage them.

Check with your allergist or pharmacist if you are unsure about a specific drug or formula.

Treatments that are not recommended for allergic rhinitis

  1. Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  2. Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.

If you wake up every morning feeling love you’ve got a wicked case of hay fever (even in the middle of winter), what’s exterior your window might not be to blame.

You could be allergic to something lurking indoors, correct under your noseor head.

Not to gross you out too much, but these microscopic buggers are literally everywhere in your home, including your bed. They live in soft surfaces (think couches, rugs, and curtains) and feed off your dead skin cells, according to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. They’re also a major source of allergens for a lot of people, and yup—the symptoms glance just love hay fever.

“People with a dust mite allergy may develop a stuffy nose, sneezing, itchy eyes, post nasal drip, and a cough,” says Kathleen Dass, MD, an allergist and immunologist based in Michigan.

“One clue that you may own a dust mite allergy is if you go to sleep feeling well but wake up with significant nose, eye, skin, or respiratory symptoms.”

And, you guessed it, pillows are one of the *biggest* sources of exposure. It makes sense: If your face is coming into contact with a dust mite-riddled surface every night for eight hours straight, of course you’re going to wake up feeling miserable.

Thankfully, this is where hypoallergenic pillows come in. “Hypoallergenic pillows are grand for people with hay fever, seasonal allergies, year-round allergies (allergic rhinitis or allergic rhino-conjunctivitis), asthma, or eczema,” says Dr. Dass. In fact, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology recommends that dust mite allergy sufferers focus on upgrading their bedding to reduce symptoms, and hypoallergenic pillows (which are filled with materials that repel dust mites) are a grand put to start.

But before you run out and purchase one, there’s a few things to hold in mind.

“Make certain the pillow is actually labeled hypoallergenic because this guarantees it will protect you from dust mites,” says Dr. Dass. “But also glance for the same basics you would glance for in any pillow—firmness, filling, pillow height, and size—since you still need to get a excellent night’s rest.” You also desire to avoid pillows with harsh chemicals, raw materials, and below feathers (if you’re allergic), since they can make you feel even worse.

If you’re hoping a hypoallergenic pillow will solve every your sleep-related sniffles and sneezes, here are nine options that are almost guaranteed to bring you sweet relief.

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1

If you’re a wishy-washy shopper

Premium Adjustable Loft PillowCoop Home

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This pillow is a patient favorite in Dr.

Dass’s practice. She alsoloves that it can be returned after days if it’s not a excellent fit for you (like if you’re not a fan of memory foam). It’s adjustable, stays cool, and is machine-washable.

Oh, and it has almost five stars on Amazon—and more than 16, reviews. One buyer said, «Ever had a pillow so excellent you desire to stay in bed? Yeah. It’s love that.»

2

If you love a firm pillow

Hypoallergenic Bed Pillow

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Prefer a sturdy feel?You’ve met your match.

This cushion ismade of shredded foam, which is antibacterial and removable(so you can get exactly the correct height for your sleep position, a feature that gets two thumbs up from Dr. Dass). Reviewers also described it as having the perfect density.

One expression of warning: The shredded foam might come with a temporary odor that should fade over time.

3

If you need proper neck support

Beckham Hotel Collection Gel Pillow (2 Pack)Beckham Luxury

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This pillow arrives flat but does inflate to between four and five inches (so don’t panic when you take it out of the box).

Dr. Dass compliments the plush gel fiber and the promise of mold- and mildew-free slumber.

Reviewers also commented on how this molds nicely to your head and neck curve. And two for $35? Talk about a bargain.

4

If you dream of sleeping on plush down

Down-Alternative Allergen Barrier Pillow

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Attention back and side sleepers: This affordable pillow is a soft, cool, and machine washable alternative to below pillows, which can be irritating for numerous allergy sufferers. It’s also frequently on sale (score!).

5

If your allergies are *really* bad

Claritin® Ultimate Allergen Barrier Clearloft™

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If you feel love Goldilocks every night trying to get comfortable (that pillow is too hardbut that one is too soft), this medium-support pillow should appeal to your middle-of-the-road preferences.

Dr.

Dass also likes that it’s the only pillow that specifically mentions blocking pollen and pet dander in addition to dust mites.

6

If you need pillows for the whole fam

Miracle Deluxe PillowAs Seen On

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Shredded memory foam is a love-it-or-hate-it feature. But if you love the feel, this pillow is a price steal.It’s appropriate for all sleep positions, so you can use it in your room, your kids’ rooms, guest rooms, you name it. Beware: Several reviewers tell that it’s so comfy that their kids and partners attempt to steal it.

7

If you hate when your pillow flattens

Hot Water Washable Allergy Protection Pillow

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If your down-alternative pillow gets lumpy and weird after washing, attempt the AllerEase brand—they’re made with a polyester/cotton mix that promises to bounce correct back to fluffy form.

8

If you throw and turn

WonderSleep Pillow

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Another fan-favorite among Dr.

Dass’s patients, the WonderSleep pillow is a tad more expensive than the others but comes with a one-year warranty and super adjustable shredded memory foam to accommodate literally *any* weird sleeping positions you finish up in.

9

If you’re looking for luxury

Luxury Hotel Pillow

Queen Anne Pillow

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Comfort seekers, this one’s for you: These hotel-favorite pillows own a high thread count, so they’ll feel super soft on your skin. Dr. Dass praises the fact that they come in a firm, medium, and soft option and explain how to determine the best fit based on your preferred sleeping position.

Sarah BradleySarah Bradley is a freelancer author from Connecticut, where she lives with her husband and three sons.


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