What type of allergies are in the winter

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen, typically when it comes into contact with your mouth, nose, eyes and throat. Pollen is a fine powder from plants.

Check the pollen forecast

Media final reviewed: 21 April 2017
Media review due: 21 April 2020

Sheet final reviewed: 21 December 2017
Next review due: 21 December 2020

Treatment Options for Winter Allergy Symptoms

To treat allergy symptoms, Jones cautions against older over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, which, he says, can do more harm than good.

«Some of these drugs own too numerous side effects,» he notes, «and people don’t really understand how to match their symptoms to the product.

What type of allergies are in the winter

They just know they feel bad and desire to feel better.»

For example, some OTC allergy drugs contain decongestants, like pseudoephedrine, which can lift a user’s heart rate. The athletic ingredient in the antihistamine Benadryl — diphenhydramine — causes some tissues to dry out and promotes urinary retention, Jones says. «So people with prostate problems, who may own trouble urinating, discover that that condition worsens when they take diphenhydramine.»

Jones says that better options are decongestants that contain loratadine (such as Claritin) and cetirizine (like Zyrtec), two drugs that moved from prescription to OTC status in recent years.

What type of allergies are in the winter

Prescription steroid nasal sprays (some of which are also now available over-the-counter) tend to be more effective than antihistamine tablets, adds Rank, though individual responses vary and the two types of drugs are often used in combination.

Talk to your doctor and your pharmacist before taking any over-the-counter medication, to discuss whether it’s appropriate for your symptoms and potential side effects.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology notes that if you own a pet allergy, you might consider immunotherapy ­— allergy shots or tablets — that can potentially desensitize you to the allergen and provide lasting relief.

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Posted on: December 13, 2019

It’s the same thing almost every single night.

What type of allergies are in the winter

You brush your teeth, finish your nightly routine, climb into bed, and immediately feel congested and sneezy.

If you suffer from allergies, your symptoms most likely get worse at night. This is something you share with other allergy patients.

What type of allergies are in the winter

In fact, research shows that 74% of allergy sufferers wake up during the night because of allergy symptoms and over 90% of sufferers own difficulty sleeping.


A pharmacist can assist with hay fever

Speak to your pharmacist if you own hay fever.

They can give advice and propose the best treatments, love antihistamine drops, tablets or nasal sprays to assist with:

  1. itchy and watery eyes and sneezing
  2. a blocked nose

Find a pharmacy

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  1. your symptoms are getting worse
  2. your symptoms do not improve after taking medicines from the pharmacy


What Triggers Allergy Night-Time Symptoms?

There are multiple potential triggers for night-time allergy symptoms.

Indoor allergens including dust mites, pet dander, and pollen are a few examples. Dust mites could live in your bedroom. Pet dander, which is skin (as well as urine and saliva) and not fur, can stick to your clothing or bedding and cause allergy symptoms that way.

The same goes for pollen. It can exist indoors, and if you spend time exterior and don’t immediately wash your hands and change your clothes and shoes, you could bring even more pollen inside your bedroom.


Types of Allergies that Could Become Worse During the Night

No matter what type of allergy you own, it can ruin your sleep.

Rashes, food allergies, or an upset stomach triggered by allergies can cause sleep problems, but the most common pair of sleep-destroyers are nasal allergies and asthma, numerous of which stem from several common allergies including:

Pollen

As one of the most common allergy triggers, pollen affects millions of people in the United States.

What type of allergies are in the winter

Although it’s an outdoor powder, pollen can travel anywhere. Animals can transport it, as can insects, birds, and the wind.

When you go exterior, pollen particles settle on your skin, your hair, your clothes, and your shoes. If you don’t wash your clothes and take a shower, then you can finish up having pollen in your bed. Sleeping with an open window can also permit pollen to get in as the sun rises and pollen counts do, too.

Pet Dander

Those who are allergic to pet dander can own instant reactions or longer-term symptoms.

An animal doesn’t even own to be present for a pet dander allergic reaction to take put. Dander can travel and land on lots of household and bedroom surfaces. This means that, even if you don’t own a pet yourself, you can bring the dander home with you and then own to deal with allergy symptoms for days, maybe even longer.

Dust Mites

Both asthma and allergy sufferers could own a dust mite allergy. Dust mites prefer carpeting, some furniture, and bedding to live in. That means they love warmer indoor environments love your bedroom, which is one reason your symptoms may get worse at night – there are more dust mites in your room.

Almost microscopic dust mites may live on your pillow, box spring, and mattress.

Dust mites may cause symptoms love itchiness, a feeling of being unable to breathe, chest tightness, coughing, wheezing, eye itchiness and redness, nose stuffiness, and sneezing.

Indoor Mold

While you hope to never own to deal with indoor mildew and mold, it does happen. If you’re allergic to mold, then it could trigger your allergies and hold you up at night. That’s especially true if your bedroom is shut to a bathroom.

While we’ll share some tips for avoiding allergies later in this article, you should clean indoor mold as soon as you spot it.

What type of allergies are in the winter

To properly clean mold, stir bleach and water until you own a cleaning material made up of about five percent bleach. You can also use detergent in lieu of bleach.

Cockroaches

Cockroaches can get in through your window and make you feel symptomatic. According to information from the ACAAI, up to 98 percent of US urban homes could own cockroach allergens, with 63 percent of every other homes potentially containing the insect allergen.

If you own a cockroach allergy, you may be more susceptible to sinus infections and ear infections.

You might also experience wheezing, skin rashes, nasal congestion, and coughing as your symptoms.


Check if you own hay fever

Symptoms of hay fever include:

  1. pain around your temples and forehead
  2. loss of smell
  3. a runny or blocked nose
  4. headache
  5. sneezing and coughing
  6. itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears
  7. earache
  8. itchy, red or watery eyes
  9. feeling tired

If you own asthma, you might also:

  1. be short of breath
  2. have a tight feeling in your chest
  3. wheeze and cough

Hay fever will final for weeks or months, unlike a freezing, which generally goes away after 1 to 2 weeks.


How to treat hay fever yourself

There’s currently no cure for hay fever and you cannot prevent it.

But you can do things to ease your symptoms when the pollen count is high.

Do

  1. stay indoors whenever possible
  2. hold windows and doors shut as much as possible
  3. put Vaseline around your nostrils to trap pollen
  4. vacuum regularly and dust with a damp cloth
  5. wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes
  6. shower and change your clothes after you own been exterior to wash pollen off
  7. purchase a pollen filter for the air vents in your car and a vacuum cleaner with a special HEPA filter

Don't

  1. do not smoke or be around smoke – it makes your symptoms worse
  2. do not hold unused flowers in the home
  3. do not cut grass or stroll on grass
  4. do not dry clothes exterior – they can catch pollen
  5. do not spend too much time exterior
  6. do not let pets into the home if possible – they can carry pollen indoors

Allergy UK has more tips on managing hay fever.


Treatments for hay fever from a GP

Your GP might prescribe steroids.

If steroids and other hay fever treatments do not work, your GP may refer you for immunotherapy.

This means you’ll be given little amounts of pollen as an injection or tablet to slowly build up your immunity to pollen.

This helpful of treatment generally starts in the winter about 3 months before the hay fever season begins.


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