What to take for itchy throat due to allergies

Your GP might prescribe steroids.

If steroids and other hay fever treatments do not work, your GP may refer you for immunotherapy.

This means you’ll be given little amounts of pollen as an injection or tablet to slowly build up your immunity to pollen.

This helpful of treatment generally starts in the winter about 3 months before the hay fever season begins.


What causes hay fever

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen, typically when it comes into contact with your mouth, nose, eyes and throat.

Pollen is a fine powder from plants.

Check the pollen forecast

Media final reviewed: 21 April 2017
Media review due: 21 April 2020

Sheet final reviewed: 21 December 2017
Next review due: 21 December 2020

Cold, Flu, or Allergy?

Know the Difference for Best Treatment

You’re feeling beautiful lousy. You’ve got sniffles, sneezing, and a sore throat. Is it a freezing, flu, or allergies? It can be hard to tell them apart because they share so numerous symptoms.

But understanding the differences will assist you select the best treatment.

“If you know what you own, you won’t take medications that you don’t need, that aren’t effective, or that might even make your symptoms worse,” says NIH’s Dr. Teresa Hauguel, an expert on infectious diseases that affect breathing.

Cold, flu, and allergy every affect your respiratory systemThe body parts that assist you breathe, including your nose, throat, and lungs., which can make it hard to breathe. Each condition has key symptoms that set them apart.

Colds and flu are caused by diverse viruses.

“As a law of thumb, the symptoms associated with the flu are more severe,” says Hauguel. Both illnesses can lead to a runny, stuffy nose; congestion; cough; and sore throat. But the flu can also cause high fever that lasts for 3-4 days, along with a headache, fatigue, and general aches and pain. These symptoms are less common when you own a cold.

“Allergies are a little diverse, because they aren’t caused by a virus,” Hauguel explains. “Instead, it’s your body’s immune systemProtects your body from invading germs and other microscopic threats.

What to take for itchy throat due to allergies

reacting to a trigger, or allergen, which is something you’re allergic to.” If you own allergies and breathe in things love pollen or pet dander, the immune cells in your nose and airways may overreact to these harmless substances. Your delicate respiratory tissues may then swell, and your nose may become stuffed up or runny.

“Allergies can also cause itchy, watery eyes, which you don’t normally own with a freezing or flu,” Hauguel adds.

Allergy symptoms generally final as endless as you’re exposed to the allergen, which may be about 6 weeks during pollen seasons in the spring, summer, or drop. Colds and flu rarely final beyond 2 weeks.

Most people with a freezing or flu recover on their own without medical care.

But check with a health care provider if symptoms final beyond 10 days or if symptoms aren’t relieved by over-the-counter medicines. For more about when to see a doctor, go to CDC’s Flu Page.

To treat colds or flu, get plenty of relax and drink lots of fluids. If you own the flu, pain relievers such as aspirin, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen can reduce fever or aches. Allergies can be treated with antihistamines or decongestants. See the “Wise Choices” box for more details.

Be careful to avoid “drug overlap” when taking medicines that list 2 or more athletic ingredients on the label.

For example, if you take 2 diverse drugs that contain acetaminophen—one for a stuffy nose and the other for headache—you may be getting too much acetaminophen.

“Read medicine labels carefully—the warnings, side effects, dosages. If you own questions, talk to your doctor or pharmacist, especially if you own children who are sick,” Hauguel says. “You don’t desire to overmedicate, and you don’t desire to risk taking a medication that may interact with another.”

Symptoms Cold Flu Airborne Allergy
Fever Rare Usual, high (100-102 °F), sometimes higher, especially in young children); lasts 3-4 days Never
Headache Uncommon Common Uncommon
General Aches, Pains Slight Usual; often severe Never
Fatigue, Weakness Sometimes Usual, can final up to 3 weeks Sometimes
Extreme Exhaustion Never Usual, at the beginning of the illness Never
Stuffy, Runny Nose Common Sometimes Common
Sneezing Usual Sometimes Usual
Sore Throat Common Sometimes Sometimes
Cough Common Common, can become severe Sometimes
Chest Discomfort Mild to moderate Common Rare, except for those with allergic asthma
Treatment Get plenty of rest.
Stay hydrated.

(Drink plenty of fluids.)
Decongestants.
Aspirin (ages 18 and up), acetaminophen, or ibuprofen for aches and pains

Get plenty of rest.
Stay hydrated.
Aspirin (ages 18 and up), acetaminophen, or ibuprofen for aches, pains, and fever
Antiviral medicines (see your doctor)
Avoid allergens (things that you’re allergic to)
Antihistamines
Nasal steroids
Decongestants
Prevention Wash your hands often.
Avoid shut contact with anyone who has a cold.
Get the flu vaccine each year.
Wash your hands often.
Avoid shut contact with anyone who has the flu.
Avoid allergens, such as pollen, home dust mites, mold, pet dander, cockroaches.
Complications Sinus infection middle ear infection, asthma Bronchitis, pneumonia; can be life-threatening Sinus infection, middle ear infection, asthma

You own an allergy when your body overreacts to things that don’t cause problems for most people.

These things are called allergens. If you own allergies, your body releases chemicals when you are exposed to an allergen. One type of chemical that your body releases is called histamine. Histamine is your body’s defense against the allergen. The release of histamine causes your symptoms.

Hay fever is an allergic reaction to pollen. Pollen comes from flowering trees, grass, and weeds. If you are allergic to pollen, you will notice your symptoms are worse on boiling, dry days when wind carries the pollen. On rainy days, pollen often is washed to the ground, which means you are less likely to breathe it.

  1. Allergies that happen in the summer (late May to mid-July) are often due to grass and weed pollen.
  2. Allergies that happen in the spring (late April and May) are often due to tree pollen.
  3. Allergies that happen in the drop (late August to the first frost) are often due to ragweed.

Allergens that can cause perennial allergic rhinitis include:

  1. Animal dander.Proteins found in the skin, saliva, and urine of furry pets such as cats and dogs are allergens.

    You can be exposed to dander when handling an animal or from home dust that contains dander.

  2. Mold. Mold is common where water tends to collect, such as shower curtains and damp basements. It can also be found in rotting logs, hay, and mulch. This allergy is generally worse during humid and rainy weather.
  3. Dust. Numerous allergens, including dust mites, are in dust. Dust mites are tiny living creatures found in bedding, mattresses, carpeting, and upholstered furniture.

    They live on dead skin cells and other things found in home dust.

No matter why it’s happening, a cough is always annoying—it’s noisy, it’s uncomfortable, and it never fails to garner unwanted attention.

But what’s really behind that cough?

What to take for itchy throat due to allergies

Can allergies cause coughing—or do you just own an annoying cold?

Well, turns out, there are some beautiful distinct differences between allergy coughs and freezing coughs…


How to treat hay fever yourself

There’s currently no cure for hay fever and you cannot prevent it.

But you can do things to ease your symptoms when the pollen count is high.

Do

  1. hold windows and doors shut as much as possible
  2. stay indoors whenever possible
  3. vacuum regularly and dust with a damp cloth
  4. wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes
  5. shower and change your clothes after you own been exterior to wash pollen off
  6. put Vaseline around your nostrils to trap pollen
  7. purchase a pollen filter for the air vents in your car and a vacuum cleaner with a special HEPA filter

Don't

  1. do not dry clothes exterior – they can catch pollen
  2. do not hold unused flowers in the home
  3. do not smoke or be around smoke – it makes your symptoms worse
  4. do not cut grass or stroll on grass
  5. do not spend too much time exterior
  6. do not let pets into the home if possible – they can carry pollen indoors

Allergy UK has more tips on managing hay fever.


Just curious: Why do we cough, anyway?

«The purpose of a cough is to assist us,» says Monica Lee, MD, an otolaryngologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear.

It’s your body’s way of trying to expel something it perceives as a threat in the airway, she says.

Those perceived threats can be a bunch of diverse things: a piece of food stuck in your throat, pollen, air pollution, or swelling or drainage from additional mucus in your throat.

What to take for itchy throat due to allergies

Every those things irritate the sensory fibers in your airway, which then stimulate a cough.

As for what exactly happens in your body during a cough?

What to take for itchy throat due to allergies

It’s helpful of complicated, says Dr. Lee. Basically, your vocal chords shut briefly to generate pressure in the lungs. Once enough pressure is built up, your vocal chords open back up, and air flows quickly through your voice box, which generates that coughing sound. Kinda cool, huh?


A pharmacist can assist with hay fever

Speak to your pharmacist if you own hay fever.

They can give advice and propose the best treatments, love antihistamine drops, tablets or nasal sprays to assist with:

  1. itchy and watery eyes and sneezing
  2. a blocked nose

Find a pharmacy

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  1. your symptoms are getting worse
  2. your symptoms do not improve after taking medicines from the pharmacy


Check if you own hay fever

Symptoms of hay fever include:

  1. headache
  2. loss of smell
  3. pain around your temples and forehead
  4. itchy, red or watery eyes
  5. itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears
  6. earache
  7. a runny or blocked nose
  8. sneezing and coughing
  9. feeling tired

If you own asthma, you might also:

  1. be short of breath
  2. have a tight feeling in your chest
  3. wheeze and cough

Hay fever will final for weeks or months, unlike a freezing, which generally goes away after 1 to 2 weeks.


So…can allergies cause coughing?

Give it to me straight.

In short, yes. Generally, allergies create dry coughs (it’s a direct reaction to something you’re sensitive or allergic to in the airways). If that’s the case, you’ll likely own other symptoms (think: itchy, watery eyes; a runny nose; an itchy throat; and sneezing, says Dr. Lee). Headaches and wheezing often come with allergies, too, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

Timing’s also a factor. If you’re allergic to pollen (or your BFF’s new adorable kitten), for example, you’ll likely notice symptoms (including your cough) almost immediately, or within an hour of being exposed.

And those symptoms could final for hours after you’ve been exposed—even after the allergen isn’t nearby anymore.

Coughs related to allergies are also dependent on patterns, so doctors always attempt to glance at the large picture. Tell you get a cough every single March. That could be a sign you’re actually suffering from allergies, instead of the common freezing. «You need to glance at everything that’s going on,» says Paul Bryson, MD, an otolaryngologist at the Cleveland Clinic.

Your best defense for a cough from allergies?

What to take for itchy throat due to allergies

Antihistamines love Allegra, Claritin, and Zyrtec, which are every available over-the-counter. Other options include steroid nasal sprays and immunotherapy shots, which can work to regulate your body’s response to allergens, instead of just relieving the symptoms.


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What to take for itchy throat due to allergies