What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

Blood pressure is measured in values of millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). A blood pressure reading lower than 90 mm HG for the top (systolic) number or 60 mm Hg for the bottom (diastolic) number is generally regarded as hypotension.

At this level, symptoms may develop in some people but not in others. Generally speaking, the lower the blood pressure drops, the greater the risk (and severity) of symptoms.

Common Symptoms

A sudden drop in blood pressure can manifest with symptoms as the decreased blood flow starves the body of the oxygen and nutrients that it needs to function.

Common signs of hypotension include:

  1. Nausea
  2. Lack of concentration
  3. Sleepiness
  4. Fatigue
  5. Blurred vision
  6. Lightheadedness
  7. Dizziness
  8. Fainting

A plethora of other symptoms may be involved—including chest pain, shortness of breath, irregular heartbeat, hives, fever, indigestion, and vomiting—but these tend to be associated with the condition that caused the sudden drop in the blood pressure. In the finish, hypotension is a symptom that can often point you in the direction of the underlying cause.

Severe Symptoms

Extreme hypotension can severely deprive the brain and vital organs of oxygen and nutrients, leading to a life-threatening condition called shock.

Shock can progress rapidly, typically manifesting with symptoms like:

  1. Weak pulse
  2. Increased thirst
  3. Profuse sweating
  4. Rapid, shallow breathing
  5. Cold, clammy skin
  6. Extreme anxiety
  7. Extreme weakness
  8. Rapid heart rate
  9. Confusion

These symptoms can lead to unconsciousness, cardiac arrest, and death as the complications progressively worsen.


Causes

There are numerous causes of hypotension, both common and unusual, innocent and serious.

There are even some forms that are entirely idiopathic (of no known origin).

What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

To comprehend the causes of hypotension, you first need to understand how the body regulates blood pressure.

How to take it

You can take enalapril with or without food. Swallow the tablets whole with a drink.

If you’re taking enalapril as a liquid, it will come with a plastic syringe or spoon to assist you measure out the correct dose. If you don’t own one, enquire your pharmacist for one. Don’t use a kitchen teaspoon as it won’t give you the correct quantity of medicine.

How to take it

Atenolol does not generally upset your tummy, so you can take it with or without food. It’s best to do the same each day.

Swallow the tablets whole with a drink of water.

What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

If you discover them hard to swallow, some brands own a score line to assist you break the tablet in half. Check the information leaflet for your brand to see if you can do this.

If you’re taking atenolol as a liquid, it’ll come with a plastic syringe or spoon to assist you measure out the correct dose.

If you do not own one, enquire your pharmacist for one. Do not use a kitchen teaspoon as it will not give you the correct quantity of medicine.

Urgent advice: Call your doctor or go to A&E straight away if you take too much enalapril

If you need to go to hospital, do not drive yourself — get someone else to drive you or call for an ambulance.

Take the enalapril packet, or the leaflet inside it, plus any remaining medicine with you.

You’ll generally take atenolol once or twice a day.

When you start taking atenolol, your doctor may advise you to take your first dose before bedtime because it can make you feel dizzy.

After the first dose, if you do not feel dizzy, you can take your medicine in the morning.

If you’re taking atenolol twice a day, you’ll generally own 1 dose in the morning and 1 dose in the evening.

What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

It’s a excellent thought to leave 10 to 12 hours between doses if you can.

Do not stop taking atenolol suddenly, especially if you own heart disease. This can make your condition worse.

If you desire to stop taking your medicine, speak to your doctor.

What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

They may recommended reducing your dose gradually over a few weeks.

What if I forget to take it?

If you miss a dose of enalapril, leave out that dose and take your next dose at the usual time. Do not take a double dose to make up for the forgotten dose.

If you forget doses often, it may assist to set an alarm to remind you.

What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

You could also enquire your pharmacist for advice on other ways to remember your medicine.

What if I take too much?

The quantity of atenolol that can lead to an overdose varies from person to person.

Extreme Vasodilation

Vasodilation describes the sudden widening of blood vessels as smooth muscles relax in response to chemical, neurological, or immunologic stimuli. With vasodilation, blood pressure will drop as the space within the vessels increase while the volume of blood remains the same.

Common causes of vasodilation include:

Decreased Cardiac Output

Even if blood volumes are normal, conditions that lower the body's ability to pump blood through the body can cause hypotension.

Causes of decreased cardiac output include:

What if I forget to take it?

If you forget to take a dose of atenolol, take it as soon as you remember, unless it’s almost time for your next dose.

In this case, just leave out the missed dose and take your next dose as normal.

Never take 2 doses at the same time. Do not take an additional dose to make up for a forgotten one.

If you often forget doses, it may assist to set an alarm to remind you.

You could also enquire your pharmacist for advice on other ways to assist you remember to take your medicine.

Conditions

Hypotension can be broadly categorized by its underlying causes. Chief among them are reduced blood volume, decreased cardiac output, excessive vasodilation, and functional syndromes involving a cascade of interconnected events. These categories can often overlap, making diagnoses every the more complicated.

How much will I take?

How much you take depends on why you need atenolol.

  1. For angina (chest pain) — the usual dose is 100mg taken once a day, or divide into 2 50mg doses.
  2. For irregular heartbeats (arrhythmia) — the usual dose is 50mg to 100mg taken once a day.
  3. For high blood pressure — the usual dose is 25mg to 50mg taken once a day.
  4. For migraine — the usual dose is 25mg to 100mg taken twice a day. Doctors sometimes prescribe atenolol for migraine, but it’s not officially approved for preventing it.

For children taking atenolol, your child’s doctor will work out the correct dose by using their weight and age.

Functional Syndromes

Hypotensive syndromes can be described as interconnected physiological events that bring about a sudden drop in blood pressure.

What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

Some of these happen on their own with no underlying disease or long-term consequence. Others happen in response to disease or other external factors.

Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (NOH)

It’s usual to take enalapril once or twice a day.

Your doctor may advise you to take your first dose before bedtime, because it can make you dizzy. After the first dose, if you do not feel dizzy, you can take enalapril at any time of day. Attempt to take it at the same time every day.

If you own enalapril twice a day, attempt to take it once in the morning and once in the evening.

What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

Leave 10 to 12 hours between doses if you can.

What if I get ill while I’m taking it?

If you get severe diarrhoea or vomiting for any reason, stop taking enalapril. When you’re capable to eat and drink normally, wait for 24 to 48 hours, then start to take it again.

If you own questions about this, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Will my dose go up or down?

You will probably be prescribed a low dose of enalapril at first so it doesn’t make you feel dizzy. This will generally be increased gradually until you reach the correct dose for you. If you’re bothered by side effects with enalapril you can stay on a lower dose.

Physiology

Blood pressure is regulated by the autonomic nervous system which oversees the body's unconscious functions.

What to take for allergies with high blood pressure

It does so by continually balancing the two "faces" of the autonomic nervous system, namely:

  1. Sympathetic nervous system, which raises the blood pressure by activating the body's "fight-or-flight" response
  2. Parasympathetic nervous system, which lowers the blood pressure by decreasing the heart rate

Any condition that suppresses the sympathetic system and/or overactivates the parasympathetic system can disrupt this balance, leading to a sudden and sometimes steep drop in blood pressure.

There may also be physiological components to low blood pressure, including any condition that physically impairs normal blood flow.

It may be a temporary condition, such as placing excessive pressure on a major artery, or a chronic one, such as cardiovascular disease.

How much to take

The dose of enalapril you take depends on why you need the medicine. Take it as your doctor tells you to.

To decide the correct dose for you, your doctor will check your blood pressure and enquire you if you are getting any side effects. You may also own blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working and the quantity of potassium in your blood.

Depending on why you’re taking enalapril, the usual starting dose is between 2.5mg and 20mg once a day. This will be increased gradually over a few weeks to a usual dose of:

  1. 20mg once a day for high blood pressure
  2. 10mg once a day or 20mg once a day for heart failure

The maximum dose is 20mg twice a day.

Doses are generally lower for children or people with kidney problems.

What if I take too much?

If you take too numerous enalapril tablets, contact your doctor or go to your nearest hospital accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away. An overdose of enalapril can cause dizziness, sleepiness and a pounding heartbeat.

The quantity of enalapril that can lead to an overdose varies from person to person.

Hypovolemia

Hypovolemia, the term used to describe reduced blood volume, is the most common cause of hypotension. It is caused by the excessive loss of fluids and/or insufficient intake of fluids.

Causes of hypovolemia include:

  1. Fasting
  2. Excessive use of diuretics ("water pills")
  3. Heatstroke
  4. Severe diarrhea or vomiting
  5. Kidney problems (causing excess urination and the loss of water and sodium)
  6. Dehydration
  7. Loss of blood
  8. Starvation
  9. Severe pancreatitis (causing the leakage of fluid into the abdominal cavity)

Urgent advice: Call your doctor or go to A&E straight away if you take too much atenolol

If you take more than the prescribed dose, your heart rate may slow below and you may discover it hard to breathe.

It can also cause dizziness and trembling.

If you need to go to hospital, do not drive yourself. Get someone else to drive you or call for an ambulance.

Take the atenolol packet or leaflet inside it, plus any remaining medicine, with you.

Find your nearest A&E


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