What to do for cats with skin allergies

If you are allergic to your pet and your reactions aren’t life-threatening, there are numerous ways to reduce indoor allergens and allergy symptoms so you and your pet can live together more comfortably.

If your or a family member’s allergies are simply miserable, but not life-threatening, take these five steps to reduce the symptoms:

1. Create an «allergy free» zone in your home—preferably the allergic person’s bedroom—and strictly prohibit the pet’s access to it.

Use a high-efficiency HEPA air cleaner, and consider using impermeable covers for the mattress and pillows.

2. Use HEPA air cleaners throughout the relax of the home, and avoid dust-and-dander-catching furnishings such as cloth curtains and blinds and carpeted floors. Clean frequently and thoroughly to remove dust and dander, washing articles such as sofa covers and pillows, curtains, and pet beds.

3. Bathe your pet on a weekly basis to reduce the level of allergy-causing dander (shed ancient skin cells). Cats can get used to being bathed, but it’s critical to only use products labeled for them; kittens may need a shampoo safe for kittens.

Check with your veterinarian’s staff or a excellent book on pet care for directions about safe bathing, It’s a excellent thought to use a shampoo recommended by your veterinarian or other animal care professional.

4. Don’t be quick to blame the family pet for allergies. Enquire your allergist to specifically test for allergies to pet dander. Numerous allergy sufferers are sensitive to more than one allergen. Reduce the overall allergen level in your environment by concentrating on every of the causes, not just the pet allergy.

5.

Attempt treatments. Additional treatments for allergies to pets are include immunotherapy (allergy shots), steroidal and antihistamine nose sprays and antihistamine pills. It is significant to discover an allergist who understands your commitment to living with your pet. A combination of approaches—medical control of symptoms, excellent housecleaning methods, and immunotherapy—is most likely to succeed in allowing an allergic person to live with pets.


Be happy you didn’t let allergies break up a beautiful relationship

It is worth it to preserve the bond between you and your pet by checking if you are truly allergic to your pet and, if you are, to attempt these solutions.

Join the large number of animal lovers who manage their allergies and live happily and healthily with their beloved pets.

A clean cat is a happy cat, and we’re here to help! From nail trims to bathing, a little maintenance goes a endless way. Read on to discover out how to hold your kitty’s eyes, ears, teeth, skin and fur healthy and clean. Please note: There are some cats who do not tolerate being groomed. If your cat fights the grooming process, and there is some potential that injury could happen to your cat or yourself, please make an appointment with a professional groomer or a veterinarian to own your cat groomed.

Dental Care

Your cat needs clean, sharp teeth and healthy gums.

Damage to the tongue, teeth, palate and gums can lead to numerous health risks for felines, but these can be prevented with regular home check-ups and excellent old-fashioned brushings.

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  1. First get your cat used to the thought of having her teeth brushed. Start by gently massaging her gums with your fingers or touching a cotton swab to them.
  2. Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause a buildup on a cat’s teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss.
  3. After a few sessions, put a little bit of cat-formulated toothpaste on her lips to get her used to the taste.
  4. With your cat facing you, gently shove back his lips and take a look. The gums should be firm and pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling.

    The teeth should be clean and free of any brownish tartar, and none should be loose or broken.

  5. Pus
  6. If your kitty’s mouth has an abnormally strong odor, he may own digestive problems or a gum condition such as gingivitis, and should be examined by a vet.
  7. Excessive pawing at the mouth area
  8. Ulcers on gums or tongue
  9. All you’ll need to brush your cat’s teeth are cotton swabs and a little toothbrush and tube of toothpaste formulated for felines. You can also use salt and water. Enquire your vet to propose the brushing supplies that he trusts, and be certain never to use toothpaste designed for people—the ingredients can be unhealthy for your cat.
  10. At any sign of gum inflammation, you should take your cat in for a veterinary exam. If left untreated, gum disease can develop, possibly leading to tooth loss or inability to eat Inflammation may also point to an internal problem love kidney disease or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus.
  11. Loose teeth
  12. Dark red line along the gums
  13. Excessive drooling
  14. Watch for any of the following signs that could indicate problems in your cat’s mouth:
  15. Introduce a toothbrush designed especially for cats—it will be smaller than human toothbrushes and own softer bristles.

    Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger are also available and permit you to give a nice massage to your cat’s gums.

  16. Red and swollen gums
  17. Difficulty chewing food
  18. Apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a tender brushing.

Brush your cat’s teeth at home by following these simple steps:

  • Be wary of your kitty’s sensitive paw pads. In boiling and freezing weather, moisturize them with a vet-recommended product and attempt to avoid letting your cat’s feet touch freezing patios, boiling sidewalks or other uncomfortable surfaces.
  • Gently take one of your cat’s paws between your fingers and massage for no longer than three seconds. If your cat pulls her paw away, don’t squeeze or pinch, just follow her gesture, keeping in tender contact.

    When she’s still again, give her pad a little press so that the nail extends out, then release her paw and immediately give her a treat. Do this every other day on a diverse toe until you’ve gotten to know every ten.

  • Long-haired kitties may own hair sprouting in between their toes. If this irritates your cat (you’ll know if she licks at the hair obsessively), trim them gently with a little pair of rounded scissors.
  • After a few sessions, put a little bit of cat-formulated toothpaste on her lips to get her used to the taste.
  • Place a little bit of liquid ear cleaner (ask your vet for a recommendation) onto a clean cotton ball or piece of gauze.
  • Introduce a toothbrush designed especially for cats—it will be smaller than human toothbrushes and own softer bristles.

    Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger are also available and permit you to give a nice massage to your cat’s gums.

  • If you notice your cat obsessively cleaning her paws, limping or favoring one leg, please investigate—she might require veterinary attention.
  • Gingivitis: This inflammation of the gums is mainly seen in older cats. It may start as a dark red line bordering on the teeth. If left untreated, gums may become sore and ulceration may happen. This may be a sign of FIV or other infection.
  • Fold kitty’s ear back gently and wipe away any debris or earwax that you can see on the underside of her ear.
  • The pink part of a cat’s nail, called the quick, is where the nerves and blood vessels are.

    Do NOT cut this sensitive area. Snip only the white part of the claw.

    What to do for cats with skin allergies

    It’s better to be cautious and cut less of the nail rather than risk cutting this area. If you do accidentally cut the quick, any bleeding can be stopped with a styptic powder or stick. It’s a excellent thought to hold it nearby while you trim.

  • Don’t attempt to trim every of your cat’s claws at one time.
  • Stomatitis: This inflammation of the mouth lining may result from a foreign body in the mouth, a viral disease or dental problems.

    The cat will own difficulty eating and the inside of the mouth will appear red.

  • Your cat’s feet should always be kept clean. Aside from causing pain, unhealthy substances that stick to her feet may finish up on her tongue during grooming. Once each day, give your cat’s paws a tender wipe with a damp cloth, checking between her toes and around the paw pads. Keeping your floors and other surfaces free of debris and household chemicals will go a endless way to assist hold your cat’s feet clean.
  • Apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a tender brushing.
  • A nail-trimming every ten days to two weeks is recommended. If your cat refuses to let you clip her claws, enquire your vet or a groomer for help.
  • Rodent Ulcer: A slowly enlarging sore or swelling on the upper lip.
  • With your cat in your lap facing away from you, take one of her toes in your hand, massage and press the pad until the nail extends. Now trim only the sharp tip of one nail, release your cat’s toe and quickly give her a treat.

    If your cat didn’t notice, clip another nail, but don’t trim more than two claws in one sitting until your cat is comfortable. Then, reward her with a special treat.

  • Salivary Cyst: If salivary glands or ducts that carry saliva to the mouth become blocked, a cyst may form under the tongue.
  • Periodontitis: If gingivitis invades the tooth socket, the tooth may become loose and an abscess may form.
  • Your cat should be at ease with the sound of the clippers before you attempt to trim her nails. Sit her on your lap, put a piece of raw spaghetti into the clippers and hold them near your cat.

    (If she sniffs the clippers, set a treat on top of them for her to eat.) Next, while massaging one of your cat’s toes, gently press her toe pad. When the nail extends, clip the spaghetti with the clippers while still holding your cat’s paw gently. Now release her toe and quickly give her a treat.

  • Cats are natural explorers who sometimes get into foreign places. Check your cat’s paws regularly for any cuts, sores, splinters or swellings. Remove splinters or debris gently with tweezers and clean any little cuts. If you notice any blood, pus or an unusual odor, please take your cat to the vet to check for infection.
  • If your cat resists, don’t lift your voice or punish her.

    Never attempt a clipping when your cat is agitated or you’re upset. And don’t rush—you may cut into the quick.

  • Do NOT declaw your cat. This surgery involves amputating the finish of a cat’s toes and is highly discouraged by the ASPCA. Instead, trim regularly, provide your cat with appropriate scratching posts and enquire your veterinarian about soft plastic covers for your cat’s claws.
  • Mouth Ulcers: Ulcers on a cat’s tongue and gums are sometimes caused by feline respiratory or kidney disease.
  • First get your cat used to the thought of having her teeth brushed. Start by gently massaging her gums with your fingers or touching a cotton swab to them.
  • Choose a chair in a peaceful room where you can comfortably sit your cat on your lap. Get her when she’s relaxed and even sleepy, such as in her groggy, after-meal state.

    Take care that she isn’t capable to spy any birds, wild animals or action exterior nearby windows—and make certain no other pets are around.

  • Lift away the dirt and wax rather than rubbing it into the ear. And do not attempt to clean the canal—probing inside of your cat’s ear can cause trauma or infection.

Chew toys can satisfy your cat’s natural desire to chomp, while making her teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also assist floss your cat’s teeth, massage her gums and scrape away soft tartar.

If your cat suffers from any of the symptoms mentioned under, please see the vet correct away:

  1. Salivary Cyst: If salivary glands or ducts that carry saliva to the mouth become blocked, a cyst may form under the tongue.
  2. Rodent Ulcer: A slowly enlarging sore or swelling on the upper lip.
  3. Stomatitis: This inflammation of the mouth lining may result from a foreign body in the mouth, a viral disease or dental problems.

    The cat will own difficulty eating and the inside of the mouth will appear red.

  4. Gingivitis: This inflammation of the gums is mainly seen in older cats. It may start as a dark red line bordering on the teeth. If left untreated, gums may become sore and ulceration may happen. This may be a sign of FIV or other infection.
  5. Periodontitis: If gingivitis invades the tooth socket, the tooth may become loose and an abscess may form.
  6. Mouth Ulcers: Ulcers on a cat’s tongue and gums are sometimes caused by feline respiratory or kidney disease.

Paw and Nail Care

Healthy Paws

Cats need healthy feet to scratch, climb and achieve their famed acrobatic landings.

That’s why it’s significant to regularly examine and clean your cat’s paws and make certain they’re wound-free.

Expand to read more

  1. Do NOT declaw your cat. This surgery involves amputating the finish of a cat’s toes and is highly discouraged by the ASPCA. Instead, trim regularly, provide your cat with appropriate scratching posts and enquire your veterinarian about soft plastic covers for your cat’s claws.
  2. Don’t attempt to trim every of your cat’s claws at one time.
  3. Place a little bit of liquid ear cleaner (ask your vet for a recommendation) onto a clean cotton ball or piece of gauze.
  4. Cats are natural explorers who sometimes get into foreign places.

    Check your cat’s paws regularly for any cuts, sores, splinters or swellings. Remove splinters or debris gently with tweezers and clean any little cuts. If you notice any blood, pus or an unusual odor, please take your cat to the vet to check for infection.

  5. Your cat should be at ease with the sound of the clippers before you attempt to trim her nails. Sit her on your lap, put a piece of raw spaghetti into the clippers and hold them near your cat. (If she sniffs the clippers, set a treat on top of them for her to eat.) Next, while massaging one of your cat’s toes, gently press her toe pad.

    When the nail extends, clip the spaghetti with the clippers while still holding your cat’s paw gently. Now release her toe and quickly give her a treat.

  6. Your cat’s feet should always be kept clean. Aside from causing pain, unhealthy substances that stick to her feet may finish up on her tongue during grooming. Once each day, give your cat’s paws a tender wipe with a damp cloth, checking between her toes and around the paw pads.

    Keeping your floors and other surfaces free of debris and household chemicals will go a endless way to assist hold your cat’s feet clean.

  7. A nail-trimming every ten days to two weeks is recommended. If your cat refuses to let you clip her claws, enquire your vet or a groomer for help.
  8. If you notice your cat obsessively cleaning her paws, limping or favoring one leg, please investigate—she might require veterinary attention.
  9. If your cat resists, don’t lift your voice or punish her.

    Never attempt a clipping when your cat is agitated or you’re upset. And don’t rush—you may cut into the quick.

  10. Fold kitty’s ear back gently and wipe away any debris or earwax that you can see on the underside of her ear.
  11. Gently take one of your cat’s paws between your fingers and massage for no longer than three seconds. If your cat pulls her paw away, don’t squeeze or pinch, just follow her gesture, keeping in tender contact. When she’s still again, give her pad a little press so that the nail extends out, then release her paw and immediately give her a treat.

    Do this every other day on a diverse toe until you’ve gotten to know every ten.

  12. Be wary of your kitty’s sensitive paw pads. In boiling and freezing weather, moisturize them with a vet-recommended product and attempt to avoid letting your cat’s feet touch freezing patios, boiling sidewalks or other uncomfortable surfaces.
  13. The pink part of a cat’s nail, called the quick, is where the nerves and blood vessels are. Do NOT cut this sensitive area. Snip only the white part of the claw. It’s better to be cautious and cut less of the nail rather than risk cutting this area.

    If you do accidentally cut the quick, any bleeding can be stopped with a styptic powder or stick. It’s a excellent thought to hold it nearby while you trim.

  14. Long-haired kitties may own hair sprouting in between their toes. If this irritates your cat (you’ll know if she licks at the hair obsessively), trim them gently with a little pair of rounded scissors.
  15. With your cat in your lap facing away from you, take one of her toes in your hand, massage and press the pad until the nail extends. Now trim only the sharp tip of one nail, release your cat’s toe and quickly give her a treat.

    If your cat didn’t notice, clip another nail, but don’t trim more than two claws in one sitting until your cat is comfortable. Then, reward her with a special treat.

  16. Choose a chair in a peaceful room where you can comfortably sit your cat on your lap. Get her when she’s relaxed and even sleepy, such as in her groggy, after-meal state. Take care that she isn’t capable to spy any birds, wild animals or action exterior nearby windows—and make certain no other pets are around.
  17. Lift away the dirt and wax rather than rubbing it into the ear. And do not attempt to clean the canal—probing inside of your cat’s ear can cause trauma or infection.

Nail Care

Does your kitty vanish when the clippers come out?

Do you own to wrap her in a towel to give her a manicure? Follow these steps to assist your cat relax while you trim.

Expand to read more

Chew toys can satisfy your cat’s natural desire to chomp, while making her teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also assist floss your cat’s teeth, massage her gums and scrape away soft tartar.

If your cat suffers from any of the symptoms mentioned under, please see the vet correct away:

  1. Salivary Cyst: If salivary glands or ducts that carry saliva to the mouth become blocked, a cyst may form under the tongue.
  2. Rodent Ulcer: A slowly enlarging sore or swelling on the upper lip.
  3. Stomatitis: This inflammation of the mouth lining may result from a foreign body in the mouth, a viral disease or dental problems.

    The cat will own difficulty eating and the inside of the mouth will appear red.

  4. Gingivitis: This inflammation of the gums is mainly seen in older cats. It may start as a dark red line bordering on the teeth. If left untreated, gums may become sore and ulceration may happen. This may be a sign of FIV or other infection.
  5. Periodontitis: If gingivitis invades the tooth socket, the tooth may become loose and an abscess may form.
  6. Mouth Ulcers: Ulcers on a cat’s tongue and gums are sometimes caused by feline respiratory or kidney disease.

Paw and Nail Care

Healthy Paws

Cats need healthy feet to scratch, climb and achieve their famed acrobatic landings.

That’s why it’s significant to regularly examine and clean your cat’s paws and make certain they’re wound-free.

Expand to read more

  1. Do NOT declaw your cat. This surgery involves amputating the finish of a cat’s toes and is highly discouraged by the ASPCA. Instead, trim regularly, provide your cat with appropriate scratching posts and enquire your veterinarian about soft plastic covers for your cat’s claws.
  2. Don’t attempt to trim every of your cat’s claws at one time.
  3. Place a little bit of liquid ear cleaner (ask your vet for a recommendation) onto a clean cotton ball or piece of gauze.
  4. Cats are natural explorers who sometimes get into foreign places.

    Check your cat’s paws regularly for any cuts, sores, splinters or swellings. Remove splinters or debris gently with tweezers and clean any little cuts. If you notice any blood, pus or an unusual odor, please take your cat to the vet to check for infection.

  5. Your cat should be at ease with the sound of the clippers before you attempt to trim her nails. Sit her on your lap, put a piece of raw spaghetti into the clippers and hold them near your cat. (If she sniffs the clippers, set a treat on top of them for her to eat.) Next, while massaging one of your cat’s toes, gently press her toe pad.

    When the nail extends, clip the spaghetti with the clippers while still holding your cat’s paw gently. Now release her toe and quickly give her a treat.

  6. Your cat’s feet should always be kept clean. Aside from causing pain, unhealthy substances that stick to her feet may finish up on her tongue during grooming. Once each day, give your cat’s paws a tender wipe with a damp cloth, checking between her toes and around the paw pads. Keeping your floors and other surfaces free of debris and household chemicals will go a endless way to assist hold your cat’s feet clean.
  7. A nail-trimming every ten days to two weeks is recommended. If your cat refuses to let you clip her claws, enquire your vet or a groomer for help.
  8. If you notice your cat obsessively cleaning her paws, limping or favoring one leg, please investigate—she might require veterinary attention.
  9. If your cat resists, don’t lift your voice or punish her.

    Never attempt a clipping when your cat is agitated or you’re upset. And don’t rush—you may cut into the quick.

  10. Fold kitty’s ear back gently and wipe away any debris or earwax that you can see on the underside of her ear.
  11. Gently take one of your cat’s paws between your fingers and massage for no longer than three seconds. If your cat pulls her paw away, don’t squeeze or pinch, just follow her gesture, keeping in tender contact. When she’s still again, give her pad a little press so that the nail extends out, then release her paw and immediately give her a treat.

    Do this every other day on a diverse toe until you’ve gotten to know every ten.

  12. Be wary of your kitty’s sensitive paw pads. In boiling and freezing weather, moisturize them with a vet-recommended product and attempt to avoid letting your cat’s feet touch freezing patios, boiling sidewalks or other uncomfortable surfaces.
  13. The pink part of a cat’s nail, called the quick, is where the nerves and blood vessels are. Do NOT cut this sensitive area. Snip only the white part of the claw. It’s better to be cautious and cut less of the nail rather than risk cutting this area.

    If you do accidentally cut the quick, any bleeding can be stopped with a styptic powder or stick. It’s a excellent thought to hold it nearby while you trim.

  14. Long-haired kitties may own hair sprouting in between their toes. If this irritates your cat (you’ll know if she licks at the hair obsessively), trim them gently with a little pair of rounded scissors.
  15. With your cat in your lap facing away from you, take one of her toes in your hand, massage and press the pad until the nail extends. Now trim only the sharp tip of one nail, release your cat’s toe and quickly give her a treat.

    If your cat didn’t notice, clip another nail, but don’t trim more than two claws in one sitting until your cat is comfortable. Then, reward her with a special treat.

  16. Choose a chair in a peaceful room where you can comfortably sit your cat on your lap. Get her when she’s relaxed and even sleepy, such as in her groggy, after-meal state. Take care that she isn’t capable to spy any birds, wild animals or action exterior nearby windows—and make certain no other pets are around.
  17. Lift away the dirt and wax rather than rubbing it into the ear.

    And do not attempt to clean the canal—probing inside of your cat’s ear can cause trauma or infection.

Nail Care

Does your kitty vanish when the clippers come out? Do you own to wrap her in a towel to give her a manicure? Follow these steps to assist your cat relax while you trim.

Expand to read more

  • If your cat resists, don’t lift your voice or punish her. Never attempt a clipping when your cat is agitated or you’re upset.

    And don’t rush—you may cut into the quick.

  • A nail-trimming every ten days to two weeks is recommended. If your cat refuses to let you clip her claws, enquire your vet or a groomer for help.
  • Don’t attempt to trim every of your cat’s claws at one time.
  • Choose a chair in a silent room where you can comfortably sit your cat on your lap. Get her when she’s relaxed and even sleepy, such as in her groggy, after-meal state.

    Take care that she isn’t capable to spy any birds, wild animals or action exterior nearby windows—and make certain no other pets are around.

  • The pink part of a cat’s nail, called the quick, is where the nerves and blood vessels are. Do NOT cut this sensitive area. Snip only the white part of the claw. It’s better to be cautious and cut less of the nail rather than risk cutting this area. If you do accidentally cut the quick, any bleeding can be stopped with a styptic powder or stick.

    It’s a excellent thought to hold it nearby while you trim.

  • Gently take one of your cat’s paws between your fingers and massage for no longer than three seconds. If your cat pulls her paw away, don’t squeeze or pinch, just follow her gesture, keeping in tender contact. When she’s still again, give her pad a little press so that the nail extends out, then release her paw and immediately give her a treat. Do this every other day on a diverse toe until you’ve gotten to know every ten.
  • With your cat in your lap facing away from you, take one of her toes in your hand, massage and press the pad until the nail extends. Now trim only the sharp tip of one nail, release your cat’s toe and quickly give her a treat.

    If your cat didn’t notice, clip another nail, but don’t trim more than two claws in one sitting until your cat is comfortable. Then, reward her with a special treat.

  • Your cat should be at ease with the sound of the clippers before you attempt to trim her nails. Sit her on your lap, put a piece of raw spaghetti into the clippers and hold them near your cat. (If she sniffs the clippers, set a treat on top of them for her to eat.) Next, while massaging one of your cat’s toes, gently press her toe pad.

    When the nail extends, clip the spaghetti with the clippers while still holding your cat’s paw gently. Now release her toe and quickly give her a treat.

  • Do NOT declaw your cat. This surgery involves amputating the finish of a cat’s toes and is highly discouraged by the ASPCA. Instead, trim regularly, provide your cat with appropriate scratching posts and enquire your veterinarian about soft plastic covers for your cat’s claws.

Ear Care

Your cat’s ears may be capable to pick up the sound of a bag of treats being opened across the home, but they could still use a little assist staying clean. Monitoring your kitty’s ears once per week for wax, debris and infection will assist those sensitive sonar detectors stay perky and alert to your every move.

Expand to read more

Outer Ear Check

A healthy feline ear flap, or pinna, has a layer of hair on its outer surface with no bald spots, and its inner surface is clean and light pink.

If you see any discharge, redness or swelling, your cat’s ears should be checked by a veterinarian.

Inner Ear Exam

Bring kitty into a silent room where there are no other pets. Gently fold back each ear and glance below into the canal. Healthy inner ears will be pale pink in color, carry no debris or odor and will own minimal if no earwax. If you discover that your cat’s ears are caked with wax or you detect an odor, please bring her in for a veterinary exam.

Ear Cleaning 101

Ear Care

Your cat’s ears may be capable to pick up the sound of a bag of treats being opened across the home, but they could still use a little assist staying clean.

Monitoring your kitty’s ears once per week for wax, debris and infection will assist those sensitive sonar detectors stay perky and alert to your every move.

Expand to read more

Outer Ear Check

A healthy feline ear flap, or pinna, has a layer of hair on its outer surface with no bald spots, and its inner surface is clean and light pink. If you see any discharge, redness or swelling, your cat’s ears should be checked by a veterinarian.

Inner Ear Exam

Bring kitty into a peaceful room where there are no other pets. Gently fold back each ear and glance below into the canal.

Healthy inner ears will be pale pink in color, carry no debris or odor and will own minimal if no earwax. If you discover that your cat’s ears are caked with wax or you detect an odor, please bring her in for a veterinary exam.

Ear Cleaning 101

  • Place a rubber bath mat in the sink or tub where you’ll be bathing your kitty so she doesn’t slip. Fill with three to four inches of lukewarm (not boiling, please!) water.
  • Schedule baths when your cat is at her most mellow. A frolic session with a cat dancer or other toy of choice can assist tire out even the friskiest of felines.f
  • For  your own protection, we recommend trimming Fluffy’s claws before bathing.
  • Fold kitty’s ear back gently and wipe away any debris or earwax that you can see on the underside of her ear.
  • Bleeding
  • Lift away the dirt and wax rather than rubbing it into the ear.

    And do not attempt to clean the canal—probing inside of your cat’s ear can cause trauma or infection.

  • Give your cat a excellent brushing to remove any loose hair and mats.
  • Loss of balance and disorientation
  • Use a hand-held spray hose to thoroughly wet your pet, taking care not to spray directly in her ears, eyes and nose. If you don’t own a spray hose, a plastic pitcher or unbreakable cup works great.
  • Use a washcloth to carefully wipe your pet’s face. Plain water is fine unless her face is extremely dirty—in which case, we recommend using an extra-diluted solution of shampoo, being extremely cautious around her ears and eyes.
  • Redness or swelling of the ear flap or canal
  • Persistent scratching and pawing of the ear area
  • Wrap your cat in a large towel and dry her with it in a warm place, away from drafts.

    If your kitty doesn’t mind the noise, you can use a blow dryer—on the lowest heat setting. If your pet has endless hair, you may need to carefully untangle her fur with a wide-toothed comb.

  • Accumulation of dark brown wax
  • Ear mites are common parasites that are highly contagious among pets. Telltale signs include excessive itching of the ears and debris that resembles coffee grounds.
  • Hearing loss
  • Blood blisters (hematoma) are the result of blood accumulation in the ear flap. They’re often caused by infection, ear mites, fleas or trapped debris that causes your cat to scratch her ears or shake her head excessively.
  • Black or yellowish discharge
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • Gently massage your pet with a solution of one part cat shampoo (human shampoo can dry out her skin) to five parts water, working from head to tail, in the direction of hair growth.

    What to do for cats with skin allergies

    Take care to avoid the face, ears and eyes.

  • Thoroughly rinse the shampoo off your cat with a spray hose or pitcher; again, be certain the water is lukewarm. Take excellent care that every residue has been removed, as it can irritate the skin and act as a magnet for dirt.
  • Ear infections are generally caused by bacteria, yeast or foreign debris caught in the ear canal. Treatment should be sought immediately as ear infections can cause considerable discomfort and may indicate allergies, hormonal abnormalities or hereditary disease.
  • Head tilting or shaking
  • Unpleasant odor
  • Place a little bit of liquid ear cleaner (ask your vet for a recommendation) onto a clean cotton ball or piece of gauze.
  • Gently put some cotton in her ears to hold the water out.
  • Reward your cat with endless praise—and her favorite treat—for a successful bathing session.

Signs of Ear Problems

Watch for the following signs that may indicate your cat’s ears should be checked by a veterinarian.

  1. Accumulation of dark brown wax
  2. Black or yellowish discharge
  3. Hearing loss
  4. Persistent scratching and pawing of the ear area
  5. Loss of balance and disorientation
  6. Sensitivity to touch
  7. Unpleasant odor
  8. Head tilting or shaking
  9. Redness or swelling of the ear flap or canal
  10. Bleeding

Know Your Ear Disorders

  1. Thoroughly rinse the shampoo off your cat with a spray hose or pitcher; again, be certain the water is lukewarm.

    Take excellent care that every residue has been removed, as it can irritate the skin and act as a magnet for dirt.

  2. Gently massage your pet with a solution of one part cat shampoo (human shampoo can dry out her skin) to five parts water, working from head to tail, in the direction of hair growth. Take care to avoid the face, ears and eyes.
  3. Wrap your cat in a large towel and dry her with it in a warm place, away from drafts. If your kitty doesn’t mind the noise, you can use a blow dryer—on the lowest heat setting. If your pet has endless hair, you may need to carefully untangle her fur with a wide-toothed comb.
  4. Ear mites are common parasites that are highly contagious among pets.

    Telltale signs include excessive itching of the ears and debris that resembles coffee grounds.

  5. Give your cat a excellent brushing to remove any loose hair and mats.
  6. Ear infections are generally caused by bacteria, yeast or foreign debris caught in the ear canal. Treatment should be sought immediately as ear infections can cause considerable discomfort and may indicate allergies, hormonal abnormalities or hereditary disease.
  7. Use a hand-held spray hose to thoroughly wet your pet, taking care not to spray directly in her ears, eyes and nose.

    If you don’t own a spray hose, a plastic pitcher or unbreakable cup works great.

  8. Schedule baths when your cat is at her most mellow. A frolic session with a cat dancer or other toy of choice can assist tire out even the friskiest of felines.f
  9. Place a rubber bath mat in the sink or tub where you’ll be bathing your kitty so she doesn’t slip. Fill with three to four inches of lukewarm (not boiling, please!) water.
  10. Use a washcloth to carefully wipe your pet’s face. Plain water is fine unless her face is extremely dirty—in which case, we recommend using an extra-diluted solution of shampoo, being extremely cautious around her ears and eyes.
  11. For  your own protection, we recommend trimming Fluffy’s claws before bathing.
  12. Blood blisters (hematoma) are the result of blood accumulation in the ear flap.

    They’re often caused by infection, ear mites, fleas or trapped debris that causes your cat to scratch her ears or shake her head excessively.

  13. Gently put some cotton in her ears to hold the water out.
  14. Reward your cat with endless praise—and her favorite treat—for a successful bathing session.

Skin and Fur Care

Bathing Your Cat

With her built-in grooming tools (tongue and teeth), your fastidious feline is well-equipped to tackle her own hair care needs. But if she is extremely dirty or gets into something sticky or smelly, you may need to give her a bath.

Follow these steps to ensure minimal stress and maximum efficiency.

Expand to read more

Signs of Ear Problems

Watch for the following signs that may indicate your cat’s ears should be checked by a veterinarian.

  1. Accumulation of dark brown wax
  2. Black or yellowish discharge
  3. Hearing loss
  4. Persistent scratching and pawing of the ear area
  5. Loss of balance and disorientation
  6. Sensitivity to touch
  7. Unpleasant odor
  8. Head tilting or shaking
  9. Redness or swelling of the ear flap or canal
  10. Bleeding

Know Your Ear Disorders

  1. Thoroughly rinse the shampoo off your cat with a spray hose or pitcher; again, be certain the water is lukewarm.

    Take excellent care that every residue has been removed, as it can irritate the skin and act as a magnet for dirt.

  2. Gently massage your pet with a solution of one part cat shampoo (human shampoo can dry out her skin) to five parts water, working from head to tail, in the direction of hair growth. Take care to avoid the face, ears and eyes.
  3. Wrap your cat in a large towel and dry her with it in a warm place, away from drafts. If your kitty doesn’t mind the noise, you can use a blow dryer—on the lowest heat setting. If your pet has endless hair, you may need to carefully untangle her fur with a wide-toothed comb.
  4. Ear mites are common parasites that are highly contagious among pets.

    Telltale signs include excessive itching of the ears and debris that resembles coffee grounds.

  5. Give your cat a excellent brushing to remove any loose hair and mats.
  6. Ear infections are generally caused by bacteria, yeast or foreign debris caught in the ear canal. Treatment should be sought immediately as ear infections can cause considerable discomfort and may indicate allergies, hormonal abnormalities or hereditary disease.
  7. Use a hand-held spray hose to thoroughly wet your pet, taking care not to spray directly in her ears, eyes and nose. If you don’t own a spray hose, a plastic pitcher or unbreakable cup works great.
  8. Schedule baths when your cat is at her most mellow. A frolic session with a cat dancer or other toy of choice can assist tire out even the friskiest of felines.f
  9. Place a rubber bath mat in the sink or tub where you’ll be bathing your kitty so she doesn’t slip.

    Fill with three to four inches of lukewarm (not boiling, please!) water.

  10. Use a washcloth to carefully wipe your pet’s face. Plain water is fine unless her face is extremely dirty—in which case, we recommend using an extra-diluted solution of shampoo, being extremely cautious around her ears and eyes.
  11. For  your own protection, we recommend trimming Fluffy’s claws before bathing.
  12. Blood blisters (hematoma) are the result of blood accumulation in the ear flap.

    They’re often caused by infection, ear mites, fleas or trapped debris that causes your cat to scratch her ears or shake her head excessively.

  13. Gently put some cotton in her ears to hold the water out.
  14. Reward your cat with endless praise—and her favorite treat—for a successful bathing session.

Skin and Fur Care

Bathing Your Cat

With her built-in grooming tools (tongue and teeth), your fastidious feline is well-equipped to tackle her own hair care needs. But if she is extremely dirty or gets into something sticky or smelly, you may need to give her a bath.

Follow these steps to ensure minimal stress and maximum efficiency.

Expand to read more

  • Keratitis: If your cat’s cornea becomes inflamed, the eye will glance cloudy and watery.
  • Glaucoma: The cornea becomes cloudy and the eye enlarges due to an increased pressure in the eyeball.
  • Household cleaning products
  • Use a washcloth to carefully wipe your pet’s face. Plain water is fine unless her face is extremely dirty—in which case, we recommend using an extra-diluted solution of shampoo, being extremely cautious around her ears and eyes.
  • Your vet may prescribe skin creams and/or oral medications to prevent skin problems.
  • Use a hand-held spray hose to thoroughly wet your pet, taking care not to spray directly in her ears, eyes and nose.

    If you don’t own a spray hose, a plastic pitcher or unbreakable cup works great.

  • Closed eye(s)
  • Grooming products: Certain shampoos and grooming products can irritate your cat’s skin.
  • Visible third eyelid
  • Snoring caused by an inflamed throat
  • Corticosteroids and antihistamines may be prescribed to control itching.
  • Ringworm: This highly contagious fungal infection can result in inflammation, scaly patches and hair loss. Lesions are most commonly seen on the head, ears and paws, but sometimes no signs are seen. You’ll desire to own your veterinarian treat it immediately to prevent other pets and people in the household from becoming infected.
  • Examine your cat’s skin and jacket during your grooming sessions.

    Checking for hair loss, redness, bumps, cuts, fleas, ticks or other parasites will be a quick way to determine whether you need to go the vet to solve your pet’s shedding.

  • Neglecting to brush your kitty’s jacket can lead to painful tangles and a bellyful of hair. You’ll know if your cat is suffering from hairballs when he coughs them up onto the floor or expels them in his feces. If, despite regular brushing, your cat continues to suffer from hairballs, there are several remedies available.

    Please enquire your vet to recommend a solution.

  • Feed him a healthy, balanced diet.
  • Dry, flaky or otherwise irritated skin
  • Third eyelid protrusion: If the third eyelid becomes visible or crosses your cat’s eye, he may own a wound or may be suffering from diarrhea, worms or a virus.
  • Rashes
  • Round, scaly patches on the face and paws
  • Roll below your kitty’s eyelid gently with your thumb and take a glance at the lid’s lining. It should be pink, not red or white.
  • Bacterial infection
  • Hormonal imbalance such as hyperthyroidism
  • Groom him regularly.
  • Food and other allergy testing
  • Tumors: A variety of benign and malignant skin growths can develop in cats.
  • Topical products, including shampoos, dips and sprays, to prevent and treat parasites
  • Swellings, lumps or skin discoloration
  • Antihistamines as a preventative
  • Cloudiness or change in eye color
  • Feed your cat a healthy, balanced food without fillers or artificial ingredients.
  • Constant scratching, licking and chewing at the skin, especially around the head and neck
  • Before brushing, check out the condition of your kitty’s coat.

    If it’s healthy, her hair will own a natural gloss and spring back under your hand when you touch it. There shouldn’t be any bald patches or signs of fleas and ticks, and her skin should be free of wounds and unusual bumps.

  • Cataracts: This opacity on the eye is often seen in elderly and diabetic cats.
  • A dietary supplement containing essential fatty acids
  • During your weekly grooming sessions, run your hands along your cat’s body, checking for wounds, bumps and hidden tangles. Check for ticks and flea dirt, black specks of dried blood left behind by fleas.

    Sneak a peek under her tail to check for feces attached to the fur that may need to be snipped away with scissors. It’s also significant to check around your cat’s anus for tan, rice-sized objects—these may indicate the presence of tapeworm.

  • Cortisone, steroids or allergy injections for airborne pollens
  • Other external parasites: Ear mites generally cause itching and redness around the ears, and a dark, coffee ground-like material can be seen in the ear canals. Lice can produce intense itching, and mange mites can cause severe flaking and scaling.
  • Fleas: Not only do fleas irritate the skin, cats can own an allergic response when exposed to them.

    Symptoms commonly include excessive scratching, thinning of hair above the base of the tail, crusts and red, raised skin lesions. Some cats may also be sensitive to flea-treatment products; certain flea collars, for example, may cause redness and irritation around the neck.

  • Tear-stained fur
  • Implement a flea-treatment program recommended by your veterinarian.
  • Seasonal allergies: Your cat’s constant scratching may be due to her sensitivity to common allergens from trees, mold and grasses.
  • Allergies
  • Sunburn
  • Wipe away any crusty gunk from your cat’s eyes with a damp cotton ball.

    Always wipe away from the corner of the eye, and use a unused cotton ball for each eye. Snip away any endless hairs that could be blocking her vision or poking her eyes. Attempt not to use eye washes or eye drops unless they’ve been prescribed by your vet.

  • Poor diet
  • Individual hair examination under a microscope
  • Conjunctivitis: One or both of your cat’s eyes will glance red and swollen, and there may be discharge.
  • Gently massage your pet with a solution of one part cat shampoo (human shampoo can dry out her skin) to five parts water, working from head to tail, in the direction of hair growth.

    Take care to avoid the face, ears and eyes.

  • Gently put some cotton in her ears to hold the water out.
  • Watering
  • Hairballs
  • Ear infections
  • Skin scraping with findings evaluated under a microscope to check for mites
  • Watery eyes: The fur around your cat’s eyes may be stained with tears because of blocked tear ducts or an overproduction of tears.
  • Wrap your cat in a large towel and dry her with it in a warm place, away from drafts.

    What to do for cats with skin allergies

    If your kitty doesn’t mind the noise, you can use a blow dryer—on the lowest heat setting. If your pet has endless hair, you may need to carefully untangle her fur with a wide-toothed comb.

  • Scabs
  • For longhaired cats: Long-haired cats who live indoors shed throughout the year and need grooming sessions every few days to remove dead hair and prevent tangles. Start with her abdomen and legs, gently combing the fur upward toward her head. Comb the neck fur upward, toward her chin. Make a part below the middle of her tail and gently brush out the fur on either side. You can sprinkle talcum powder over knots and gently use your fingers to tease them apart.

    If the knots don’t come out by hand, attempt using a mat-splitter.

  • Hypoallergenic diet for food allergies
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Perfumes and colognes
  • Paw chewing or swollen, sensitive paws
  • Discharge
  • A balanced diet to assist maintain healthy skin and coat
  • Environmental factors: Contact with certain chemicals or fabrics can cause skin irritation, as can exposure to the sun or excessive cold.
  • Fleas
  • Stress: Anxiety may cause cats to excessively lick and chew, causing hair loss.
  • Thoroughly clean and vacuum your home (and remember to always throw away the bag).
  • For shorthaired cats: With a metal comb, work the brush through your cat’s fur from head to tail to remove dirt and debris.

    Work along the lie of her fur, brushing in the direction the jacket grows. Brush every over her body, including her chest and abdomen, concentrating on one section at a time to remove dead hair and tangles.

    What to do for cats with skin allergies

    A rubber brush can be especially effective for removing dead hair on cats with short fur.

  • Schedule baths when your cat is at her most mellow. A frolic session with a cat dancer or other toy of choice can assist tire out even the friskiest of felines.f
  • Red or white eyelid linings
  • Pollen, grass, plants, mold, mildew, and other organic substances
  • Brush your cat regularly to prevent matting of hair.
  • Bacterial culture and sensitivity tests
  • Face your cat in a brightly lit area and glance her in the eyes. They should be clear and bright, and the area around the eyeball should be white. Her pupils should be equal in size.
  • Skin biopsy
  • Give your cat a excellent brushing to remove any loose hair and mats.
  • For  your own protection, we recommend trimming Fluffy’s claws before bathing.
  • Some cat litters
  • Ringworm
  • Itchy, runny eyes
  • Crusty gunk in the corners of the eye
  • Reward your cat with endless praise—and her favorite treat—for a successful bathing session.
  • Fleas or flea-control products
  • Food
  • Seasonal changes: Numerous cats, love people, get dry, flaky skin in the winter.
  • Blood tests to assess your cat’s overall health
  • Pregnancy or lactation
  • Place a rubber bath mat in the sink or tub where you’ll be bathing your kitty so she doesn’t slip.

    Fill with three to four inches of lukewarm (not boiling, please!) water.

  • Microscopic evaluation of cells to establish if bacteria or yeast are present
  • Prescription drugs
  • Bulging eye: Bulging can happen because of accident or trauma or an eye tumor.
  • Certain medications
  • «Tape test» to check for parasites
  • Antibiotic or antifungal medications
  • Provide calm living conditions for your cat.
  • Food allergies: Numerous foods (such as beef, milk, poultry and corn), fillers and colorings can be seen as foreign by your cat’s immune system and can lead to itching and rashes.
  • Thoroughly rinse the shampoo off your cat with a spray hose or pitcher; again, be certain the water is lukewarm.

    What to do for cats with skin allergies

    Take excellent care that every residue has been removed, as it can irritate the skin and act as a magnet for dirt.

  • Bacterial or yeast infections: These infections most commonly follow the onset of another skin disorder.
  • Hair loss, bald patches
  • Drainage of blood or pus
  • Sneezing, coughing, and wheezing – especially if the cat has asthma
  • Stress
  • Redness or inflammation
  • Use natural, hypoallergenic soaps and shampoos recommended for use on cats.
  • Retinal disease: Partial or entire vision loss can happen when light-sensitive cells at the back of the eye degenerate.
  • Flea prevention products

Brushing Your Cat

Brushing your cat not only removes dirt, grease and dead hair from her jacket, but it helps to remove skin flakes and stimulates blood circulation, improving the overall condition of her skin.

One or two brushings per week will assist kitty to hold her healthy glow—and you’ll discover that regular sessions are especially beneficial when your cat ages and is no longer capable to groom so meticulously on her own.

Expand to read more

  1. During your weekly grooming sessions, run your hands along your cat’s body, checking for wounds, bumps and hidden tangles. Check for ticks and flea dirt, black specks of dried blood left behind by fleas. Sneak a peek under her tail to check for feces attached to the fur that may need to be snipped away with scissors.

    It’s also significant to check around your cat’s anus for tan, rice-sized objects—these may indicate the presence of tapeworm.

  2. For longhaired cats: Long-haired cats who live indoors shed throughout the year and need grooming sessions every few days to remove dead hair and prevent tangles. Start with her abdomen and legs, gently combing the fur upward toward her head. Comb the neck fur upward, toward her chin.

    Make a part below the middle of her tail and gently brush out the fur on either side. You can sprinkle talcum powder over knots and gently use your fingers to tease them apart. If the knots don’t come out by hand, attempt using a mat-splitter.

  3. For shorthaired cats: With a metal comb, work the brush through your cat’s fur from head to tail to remove dirt and debris. Work along the lie of her fur, brushing in the direction the jacket grows. Brush every over her body, including her chest and abdomen, concentrating on one section at a time to remove dead hair and tangles.

    A rubber brush can be especially effective for removing dead hair on cats with short fur.

  4. Before brushing, check out the condition of your kitty’s coat. If it’s healthy, her hair will own a natural gloss and spring back under your hand when you touch it. There shouldn’t be any bald patches or signs of fleas and ticks, and her skin should be free of wounds and unusual bumps.
  5. Neglecting to brush your kitty’s jacket can lead to painful tangles and a bellyful of hair. You’ll know if your cat is suffering from hairballs when he coughs them up onto the floor or expels them in his feces. If, despite regular brushing, your cat continues to suffer from hairballs, there are several remedies available.

    Please enquire your vet to recommend a solution.

Skin Problems

The condition of your cat’s skin is an indication of her overall health. When a skin problem occurs, your cat may reply with excessive scratching, chewing and/or licking. A wide range of causes—from external parasites and allergies to seasonal changes and stress, or a combination of these—may be affecting your cat’s skin and should be investigated.

Skin problems are one of the most common reasons pet parents seek veterinary care.

Expand to read more

Symptoms of Skin Problems in Cats

  1. Rashes
  2. Hairballs
  3. Swellings, lumps or skin discoloration
  4. Constant scratching, licking and chewing at the skin, especially around the head and neck
  5. Round, scaly patches on the face and paws
  6. Scabs
  7. Hair loss, bald patches
  8. Redness or inflammation
  9. Dry, flaky or otherwise irritated skin
  10. Drainage of blood or pus

One of the following may be causing an abnormality with your cat’s skin and should be investigated:

  1. Bacterial or yeast infections: These infections most commonly follow the onset of another skin disorder.
  2. Environmental factors: Contact with certain chemicals or fabrics can cause skin irritation, as can exposure to the sun or excessive cold.
  3. Tumors: A variety of benign and malignant skin growths can develop in cats.
  4. Ringworm: This highly contagious fungal infection can result in inflammation, scaly patches and hair loss.

    Lesions are most commonly seen on the head, ears and paws, but sometimes no signs are seen. You’ll desire to own your veterinarian treat it immediately to prevent other pets and people in the household from becoming infected.

  5. Food allergies: Numerous foods (such as beef, milk, poultry and corn), fillers and colorings can be seen as foreign by your cat’s immune system and can lead to itching and rashes.
  6. Fleas: Not only do fleas irritate the skin, cats can own an allergic response when exposed to them.

    Symptoms commonly include excessive scratching, thinning of hair above the base of the tail, crusts and red, raised skin lesions. Some cats may also be sensitive to flea-treatment products; certain flea collars, for example, may cause redness and irritation around the neck.

  7. Grooming products: Certain shampoos and grooming products can irritate your cat’s skin.
  8. Other external parasites: Ear mites generally cause itching and redness around the ears, and a dark, coffee ground-like material can be seen in the ear canals.

    Lice can produce intense itching, and mange mites can cause severe flaking and scaling.

  9. Seasonal changes: Numerous cats, love people, get dry, flaky skin in the winter.
  10. Seasonal allergies: Your cat’s constant scratching may be due to her sensitivity to common allergens from trees, mold and grasses.
  11. Stress: Anxiety may cause cats to excessively lick and chew, causing hair loss.

You should visit your vet for an exam as soon as you notice any abnormality in your pet’s skin, such as excessive hair loss, flaking and scaling, redness and bald patches, or if your pet begins to excessively scratch, lick and/or bite areas on his fur.

After obtaining a history and performing a thorough physical examination of your cat, your vet may act out some of the following diagnostic tests in order to discover the cause of your cat’s symptoms:

  1. Food and other allergy testing
  2. Skin biopsy
  3. Blood tests to assess your cat’s overall health
  4. Skin scraping with findings evaluated under a microscope to check for mites
  5. Individual hair examination under a microscope
  6. «Tape test» to check for parasites
  7. Bacterial culture and sensitivity tests
  8. Microscopic evaluation of cells to establish if bacteria or yeast are present

Which Cats Are Prone to Skin Problems?

Because of the wide ranges of causes, cats of every ages and breeds are susceptible to issues involving skin.

Young, elderly, immunocompromised and cats living in overcrowded, stressful environments may be more susceptible to skin problems than others.

To Prevent Skin Problems

  1. Thoroughly clean and vacuum your home (and remember to always throw away the bag).
  2. Provide calm living conditions for your cat.
  3. Implement a flea-treatment program recommended by your veterinarian.
  4. Use natural, hypoallergenic soaps and shampoos recommended for use on cats.
  5. Feed your cat a healthy, balanced food without fillers or artificial ingredients.
  6. Brush your cat regularly to prevent matting of hair.
  7. Your vet may prescribe skin creams and/or oral medications to prevent skin problems.

To Treat Skin Problems

Ask your vet about the following treatments:

  1. Corticosteroids and antihistamines may be prescribed to control itching.
  2. A dietary supplement containing essential fatty acids
  3. Antibiotic or antifungal medications
  4. Topical products, including shampoos, dips and sprays, to prevent and treat parasites
  5. A balanced diet to assist maintain healthy skin and coat
  6. Hypoallergenic diet for food allergies

Shedding

Shedding is a cat’s natural process of losing dead hair.

Indoor cats can shed every year-round. Regularly grooming your cat and vacuuming hair from your home should minimize the inconvenience of shedding. However, if you see bald patches in your cat’s fur or notice a significant loss of hair, the underlying cause may be a health-related problem and should be investigated by a veterinarian.

Expand to read more

A variety of medical, dietary and stress-related issues can cause your cat to lose more hair than is normal. If you notice he’s losing an excessive quantity of hair or has bald patches, please consult your veterinarian immediately.

Your cat may be suffering from one of the following health issues:

  1. Certain medications
  2. Stress
  3. Pregnancy or lactation
  4. Allergies
  5. Fleas
  6. Ringworm
  7. Poor diet
  8. Bacterial infection
  9. Hormonal imbalance such as hyperthyroidism
  10. Sunburn

If your cat obsessively licks, bites or scratches, OR if he’s losing patches of hair or stops to scratch or bite the same few spots persistently, then it’s significant you take him in for a veterinary exam.

There may be a medical, dietary or stress-related issue that needs immediate attention.

If your cat sheds a lot and your veterinarian has sure that there is no underlying medical cause, there are a few things you can do to minimize his hair loss:

  1. Groom him regularly.
  2. Feed him a healthy, balanced diet.
  3. Examine your cat’s skin and jacket during your grooming sessions. Checking for hair loss, redness, bumps, cuts, fleas, ticks or other parasites will be a quick way to determine whether you need to go the vet to solve your pet’s shedding.

If your cat’s shedding is normal, the worst you may finish up with is a hairy wardrobe and home—your cat, however, may suffer from hairballs if she isn’t groomed regularly.

If her shedding is due to an underlying medical cause, including allergies, parasites, infections or disease, her health may continue to worsen if you don’t seek veterinary care. Additionally, cats who are not groomed appropriately can become matted—this is especially true for long-haired cats. Matted hair can be painful and lead to underlying skin problems.

Eye Care

A excellent home eye exam just before grooming can clue you into any tearing, crust, cloudiness or inflammation that may indicate a health problem. Here are few simple tips to hold your kitty’s eyes bright and healthy.

Expand to read more

  1. Roll below your kitty’s eyelid gently with your thumb and take a glance at the lid’s lining. It should be pink, not red or white.
  2. Face your cat in a brightly lit area and glance her in the eyes.

    They should be clear and bright, and the area around the eyeball should be white. Her pupils should be equal in size.

  3. Wipe away any crusty gunk from your cat’s eyes with a damp cotton ball. Always wipe away from the corner of the eye, and use a unused cotton ball for each eye. Snip away any endless hairs that could be blocking her vision or poking her eyes. Attempt not to use eye washes or eye drops unless they’ve been prescribed by your vet.

How can you tell if there is something incorrect with one or both of your cat’s eyes? Glance out for the following:

  1. Closed eye(s)
  2. Tear-stained fur
  3. Cloudiness or change in eye color
  4. Discharge
  5. Red or white eyelid linings
  6. Watering
  7. Crusty gunk in the corners of the eye
  8. Visible third eyelid

Certain body language will also alert you to possible eye distress.

If your cat is constantly squinting or pawing at her eye area, give her eyes a excellent inspection. If you discover any of the above symptoms, you should immediately call your vet.

The following eye-related disorders are commonly seen in cats:

  1. Bulging eye: Bulging can happen because of accident or trauma or an eye tumor.
  2. Glaucoma: The cornea becomes cloudy and the eye enlarges due to an increased pressure in the eyeball.
  3. Retinal disease: Partial or entire vision loss can happen when light-sensitive cells at the back of the eye degenerate.
  4. Conjunctivitis: One or both of your cat’s eyes will glance red and swollen, and there may be discharge.
  5. Keratitis: If your cat’s cornea becomes inflamed, the eye will glance cloudy and watery.
  6. Third eyelid protrusion: If the third eyelid becomes visible or crosses your cat’s eye, he may own a wound or may be suffering from diarrhea, worms or a virus.
  7. Cataracts: This opacity on the eye is often seen in elderly and diabetic cats.
  8. Watery eyes: The fur around your cat’s eyes may be stained with tears because of blocked tear ducts or an overproduction of tears.

Many feline eye disorders can be treated with vet-prescribed drops or ointments—your vet will show you how to apply eye and ear drops at home.

The best way to prevent eye conditions is to make certain your cat gets every her vaccinations and has thorough check-ups.

Please examine her eyes regularly and consult a vet if you discover any abnormalities. Eye conditions that are left untreated can lead to impaired sight or even blindness.

Like people, our feline friends can develop allergies. This happens when their immune systems become sensitive to substances present in their surroundings. Known as allergens, these irritating substances may not annoy you or other animals in your home, but as your cat’s body tries to get rid of the offending substances, he might show every kinds of symptoms.

Because there is such a wide variety of allergens, cat allergies are generally divided into 3 main categories: flea allergy, environmental allergies (atopic dermatitis), and food allergy.

Flea allergy and environmental allergies – the ones that cause “hay fever” symptoms in humans – are the most common. However, cats often own multiple allergies, so a thorough examination by your veterinarian or veterinary dermatologist is recommended.

Symptoms
Allergic kitties are often extremely itchy and own skin problems associated with allergic dermatitis. They also might exhibit some of these symptoms:

  1. Snoring caused by an inflamed throat
  2. Vomiting or diarrhea
  3. Ear infections
  4. Sneezing, coughing, and wheezing – especially if the cat has asthma
  5. Itchy, runny eyes
  6. Paw chewing or swollen, sensitive paws

There are a variety of allergens that cause these symptoms:

  1. Household cleaning products
  2. Prescription drugs
  3. Fleas or flea-control products
  4. Pollen, grass, plants, mold, mildew, and other organic substances
  5. Perfumes and colognes
  6. Food
  7. Some cat litters

Gastrointestinal symptoms generally accompany a food allergy, so it is significant to avoid feeding your cat food to which he or she has a known allergy.

Also, allergies tend to be more common among outdoor cats because they are exposed to a wider range of potential allergens, especially from plants and organic matter.

Diagnosis
If something appears to be making your kitty miserable, the best thing to do is pay your veterinarian a visit. He or she will initially do a finish history and physical exam for your cat to determine the source of the allergies.

If your vet suspects your cat has allergies, he might desire to act out blood tests or experiment with your kitty’s diet to narrow below the cause. Or, if your vet thinks your cat has a skin allergy, your cat might be referred to a veterinary dermatologist.

Treatment & Prevention
The best way to treat your cat’s allergies is to remove the allergens from his or her environment. For instance, if your cat’s allergies are caused by fleas, using veterinarian-recommended flea and tick preventatives can eliminate the cause. If the problem is cat litter, substituting your normal litter for a dust-free alternative could do the trick. In fact, this might assist correct a bigger problem if your cat’s been missing his or her litter box.

When it comes to pollen, fungus, mold, or dust, bathing your cat a couple of times per week can assist alleviate itching.

Your veterinarian can recommend an appropriate shampoo to assist you avoid drying out your cat’s skin.

A diagnosis of food allergies may require you to provide your cat with a prescription diet or even home-cooked meals free of the offending allergens. Your veterinarian will provide recommendations as to the best course of action. It is possible that your cat will need dietary supplements to ensure he gets every the vital nutrients he needs.

Medication
Medication is sometimes prescribed for cats in case certain allergens cannot be removed from the environment.

Medications include:

  1. Antihistamines as a preventative
  2. Cortisone, steroids or allergy injections for airborne pollens
  3. Flea prevention products

How do allergies affect asthma?
If your cat is allergic to environmental pollutants, it may worsen your cat’s asthma. In this case, your vet may prescribe medications that open your cat’s airway for the short-term; endless term solutions include corticosteroids. And here’s a excellent reminder: cigarette smoke is bad for your cat, especially if your cat has asthma.

If you own any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian – they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.

Brushing Your Cat

Brushing your cat not only removes dirt, grease and dead hair from her jacket, but it helps to remove skin flakes and stimulates blood circulation, improving the overall condition of her skin.

One or two brushings per week will assist kitty to hold her healthy glow—and you’ll discover that regular sessions are especially beneficial when your cat ages and is no longer capable to groom so meticulously on her own.

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  1. During your weekly grooming sessions, run your hands along your cat’s body, checking for wounds, bumps and hidden tangles. Check for ticks and flea dirt, black specks of dried blood left behind by fleas.

    Sneak a peek under her tail to check for feces attached to the fur that may need to be snipped away with scissors. It’s also significant to check around your cat’s anus for tan, rice-sized objects—these may indicate the presence of tapeworm.

  2. For longhaired cats: Long-haired cats who live indoors shed throughout the year and need grooming sessions every few days to remove dead hair and prevent tangles. Start with her abdomen and legs, gently combing the fur upward toward her head. Comb the neck fur upward, toward her chin. Make a part below the middle of her tail and gently brush out the fur on either side.

    You can sprinkle talcum powder over knots and gently use your fingers to tease them apart. If the knots don’t come out by hand, attempt using a mat-splitter.

  3. For shorthaired cats: With a metal comb, work the brush through your cat’s fur from head to tail to remove dirt and debris. Work along the lie of her fur, brushing in the direction the jacket grows. Brush every over her body, including her chest and abdomen, concentrating on one section at a time to remove dead hair and tangles.

    A rubber brush can be especially effective for removing dead hair on cats with short fur.

  4. Before brushing, check out the condition of your kitty’s coat. If it’s healthy, her hair will own a natural gloss and spring back under your hand when you touch it. There shouldn’t be any bald patches or signs of fleas and ticks, and her skin should be free of wounds and unusual bumps.
  5. Neglecting to brush your kitty’s jacket can lead to painful tangles and a bellyful of hair.

    You’ll know if your cat is suffering from hairballs when he coughs them up onto the floor or expels them in his feces. If, despite regular brushing, your cat continues to suffer from hairballs, there are several remedies available. Please enquire your vet to recommend a solution.

Skin Problems

The condition of your cat’s skin is an indication of her overall health. When a skin problem occurs, your cat may reply with excessive scratching, chewing and/or licking. A wide range of causes—from external parasites and allergies to seasonal changes and stress, or a combination of these—may be affecting your cat’s skin and should be investigated.

Skin problems are one of the most common reasons pet parents seek veterinary care.

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Symptoms of Skin Problems in Cats

  1. Rashes
  2. Hairballs
  3. Swellings, lumps or skin discoloration
  4. Constant scratching, licking and chewing at the skin, especially around the head and neck
  5. Round, scaly patches on the face and paws
  6. Scabs
  7. Hair loss, bald patches
  8. Redness or inflammation
  9. Dry, flaky or otherwise irritated skin
  10. Drainage of blood or pus

One of the following may be causing an abnormality with your cat’s skin and should be investigated:

  1. Bacterial or yeast infections: These infections most commonly follow the onset of another skin disorder.
  2. Environmental factors: Contact with certain chemicals or fabrics can cause skin irritation, as can exposure to the sun or excessive cold.
  3. Tumors: A variety of benign and malignant skin growths can develop in cats.
  4. Ringworm: This highly contagious fungal infection can result in inflammation, scaly patches and hair loss.

    Lesions are most commonly seen on the head, ears and paws, but sometimes no signs are seen. You’ll desire to own your veterinarian treat it immediately to prevent other pets and people in the household from becoming infected.

  5. Food allergies: Numerous foods (such as beef, milk, poultry and corn), fillers and colorings can be seen as foreign by your cat’s immune system and can lead to itching and rashes.
  6. Fleas: Not only do fleas irritate the skin, cats can own an allergic response when exposed to them.

    Symptoms commonly include excessive scratching, thinning of hair above the base of the tail, crusts and red, raised skin lesions. Some cats may also be sensitive to flea-treatment products; certain flea collars, for example, may cause redness and irritation around the neck.

  7. Grooming products: Certain shampoos and grooming products can irritate your cat’s skin.
  8. Other external parasites: Ear mites generally cause itching and redness around the ears, and a dark, coffee ground-like material can be seen in the ear canals.

    Lice can produce intense itching, and mange mites can cause severe flaking and scaling.

  9. Seasonal changes: Numerous cats, love people, get dry, flaky skin in the winter.
  10. Seasonal allergies: Your cat’s constant scratching may be due to her sensitivity to common allergens from trees, mold and grasses.
  11. Stress: Anxiety may cause cats to excessively lick and chew, causing hair loss.

You should visit your vet for an exam as soon as you notice any abnormality in your pet’s skin, such as excessive hair loss, flaking and scaling, redness and bald patches, or if your pet begins to excessively scratch, lick and/or bite areas on his fur.

After obtaining a history and performing a thorough physical examination of your cat, your vet may act out some of the following diagnostic tests in order to discover the cause of your cat’s symptoms:

  1. Food and other allergy testing
  2. Skin biopsy
  3. Blood tests to assess your cat’s overall health
  4. Skin scraping with findings evaluated under a microscope to check for mites
  5. Individual hair examination under a microscope
  6. «Tape test» to check for parasites
  7. Bacterial culture and sensitivity tests
  8. Microscopic evaluation of cells to establish if bacteria or yeast are present

Which Cats Are Prone to Skin Problems?

Because of the wide ranges of causes, cats of every ages and breeds are susceptible to issues involving skin.

Young, elderly, immunocompromised and cats living in overcrowded, stressful environments may be more susceptible to skin problems than others.

To Prevent Skin Problems

  1. Thoroughly clean and vacuum your home (and remember to always throw away the bag).
  2. Provide calm living conditions for your cat.
  3. Implement a flea-treatment program recommended by your veterinarian.
  4. Use natural, hypoallergenic soaps and shampoos recommended for use on cats.
  5. Feed your cat a healthy, balanced food without fillers or artificial ingredients.
  6. Brush your cat regularly to prevent matting of hair.
  7. Your vet may prescribe skin creams and/or oral medications to prevent skin problems.

To Treat Skin Problems

Ask your vet about the following treatments:

  1. Corticosteroids and antihistamines may be prescribed to control itching.
  2. A dietary supplement containing essential fatty acids
  3. Antibiotic or antifungal medications
  4. Topical products, including shampoos, dips and sprays, to prevent and treat parasites
  5. A balanced diet to assist maintain healthy skin and coat
  6. Hypoallergenic diet for food allergies

Shedding

Shedding is a cat’s natural process of losing dead hair.

Indoor cats can shed every year-round. Regularly grooming your cat and vacuuming hair from your home should minimize the inconvenience of shedding. However, if you see bald patches in your cat’s fur or notice a significant loss of hair, the underlying cause may be a health-related problem and should be investigated by a veterinarian.

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A variety of medical, dietary and stress-related issues can cause your cat to lose more hair than is normal. If you notice he’s losing an excessive quantity of hair or has bald patches, please consult your veterinarian immediately. Your cat may be suffering from one of the following health issues:

  1. Certain medications
  2. Stress
  3. Pregnancy or lactation
  4. Allergies
  5. Fleas
  6. Ringworm
  7. Poor diet
  8. Bacterial infection
  9. Hormonal imbalance such as hyperthyroidism
  10. Sunburn

If your cat obsessively licks, bites or scratches, OR if he’s losing patches of hair or stops to scratch or bite the same few spots persistently, then it’s significant you take him in for a veterinary exam.

There may be a medical, dietary or stress-related issue that needs immediate attention.

If your cat sheds a lot and your veterinarian has sure that there is no underlying medical cause, there are a few things you can do to minimize his hair loss:

  1. Groom him regularly.
  2. Feed him a healthy, balanced diet.
  3. Examine your cat’s skin and jacket during your grooming sessions. Checking for hair loss, redness, bumps, cuts, fleas, ticks or other parasites will be a quick way to determine whether you need to go the vet to solve your pet’s shedding.

If your cat’s shedding is normal, the worst you may finish up with is a hairy wardrobe and home—your cat, however, may suffer from hairballs if she isn’t groomed regularly.

If her shedding is due to an underlying medical cause, including allergies, parasites, infections or disease, her health may continue to worsen if you don’t seek veterinary care. Additionally, cats who are not groomed appropriately can become matted—this is especially true for long-haired cats. Matted hair can be painful and lead to underlying skin problems.

Eye Care

A excellent home eye exam just before grooming can clue you into any tearing, crust, cloudiness or inflammation that may indicate a health problem.

Here are few simple tips to hold your kitty’s eyes bright and healthy.

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  1. Roll below your kitty’s eyelid gently with your thumb and take a glance at the lid’s lining. It should be pink, not red or white.
  2. Face your cat in a brightly lit area and glance her in the eyes. They should be clear and bright, and the area around the eyeball should be white.

    Her pupils should be equal in size.

  3. Wipe away any crusty gunk from your cat’s eyes with a damp cotton ball. Always wipe away from the corner of the eye, and use a unused cotton ball for each eye. Snip away any endless hairs that could be blocking her vision or poking her eyes. Attempt not to use eye washes or eye drops unless they’ve been prescribed by your vet.

How can you tell if there is something incorrect with one or both of your cat’s eyes? Glance out for the following:

  1. Closed eye(s)
  2. Tear-stained fur
  3. Cloudiness or change in eye color
  4. Discharge
  5. Red or white eyelid linings
  6. Watering
  7. Crusty gunk in the corners of the eye
  8. Visible third eyelid

Certain body language will also alert you to possible eye distress.

If your cat is constantly squinting or pawing at her eye area, give her eyes a excellent inspection. If you discover any of the above symptoms, you should immediately call your vet.

The following eye-related disorders are commonly seen in cats:

  1. Bulging eye: Bulging can happen because of accident or trauma or an eye tumor.
  2. Glaucoma: The cornea becomes cloudy and the eye enlarges due to an increased pressure in the eyeball.
  3. Retinal disease: Partial or entire vision loss can happen when light-sensitive cells at the back of the eye degenerate.
  4. Conjunctivitis: One or both of your cat’s eyes will glance red and swollen, and there may be discharge.
  5. Keratitis: If your cat’s cornea becomes inflamed, the eye will glance cloudy and watery.
  6. Third eyelid protrusion: If the third eyelid becomes visible or crosses your cat’s eye, he may own a wound or may be suffering from diarrhea, worms or a virus.
  7. Cataracts: This opacity on the eye is often seen in elderly and diabetic cats.
  8. Watery eyes: The fur around your cat’s eyes may be stained with tears because of blocked tear ducts or an overproduction of tears.

Many feline eye disorders can be treated with vet-prescribed drops or ointments—your vet will show you how to apply eye and ear drops at home.

The best way to prevent eye conditions is to make certain your cat gets every her vaccinations and has thorough check-ups.

Please examine her eyes regularly and consult a vet if you discover any abnormalities. Eye conditions that are left untreated can lead to impaired sight or even blindness.

Like people, our feline friends can develop allergies. This happens when their immune systems become sensitive to substances present in their surroundings. Known as allergens, these irritating substances may not annoy you or other animals in your home, but as your cat’s body tries to get rid of the offending substances, he might show every kinds of symptoms.

Because there is such a wide variety of allergens, cat allergies are generally divided into 3 main categories: flea allergy, environmental allergies (atopic dermatitis), and food allergy. Flea allergy and environmental allergies – the ones that cause “hay fever” symptoms in humans – are the most common. However, cats often own multiple allergies, so a thorough examination by your veterinarian or veterinary dermatologist is recommended.

Symptoms
Allergic kitties are often extremely itchy and own skin problems associated with allergic dermatitis.

They also might exhibit some of these symptoms:

  1. Snoring caused by an inflamed throat
  2. Vomiting or diarrhea
  3. Ear infections
  4. Sneezing, coughing, and wheezing – especially if the cat has asthma
  5. Itchy, runny eyes
  6. Paw chewing or swollen, sensitive paws

There are a variety of allergens that cause these symptoms:

  1. Household cleaning products
  2. Prescription drugs
  3. Fleas or flea-control products
  4. Pollen, grass, plants, mold, mildew, and other organic substances
  5. Perfumes and colognes
  6. Food
  7. Some cat litters

Gastrointestinal symptoms generally accompany a food allergy, so it is significant to avoid feeding your cat food to which he or she has a known allergy.

Also, allergies tend to be more common among outdoor cats because they are exposed to a wider range of potential allergens, especially from plants and organic matter.

Diagnosis
If something appears to be making your kitty miserable, the best thing to do is pay your veterinarian a visit. He or she will initially do a finish history and physical exam for your cat to determine the source of the allergies.

If your vet suspects your cat has allergies, he might desire to act out blood tests or experiment with your kitty’s diet to narrow below the cause.

Or, if your vet thinks your cat has a skin allergy, your cat might be referred to a veterinary dermatologist.

Treatment & Prevention
The best way to treat your cat’s allergies is to remove the allergens from his or her environment. For instance, if your cat’s allergies are caused by fleas, using veterinarian-recommended flea and tick preventatives can eliminate the cause. If the problem is cat litter, substituting your normal litter for a dust-free alternative could do the trick.

In fact, this might assist correct a bigger problem if your cat’s been missing his or her litter box.

When it comes to pollen, fungus, mold, or dust, bathing your cat a couple of times per week can assist alleviate itching. Your veterinarian can recommend an appropriate shampoo to assist you avoid drying out your cat’s skin.

A diagnosis of food allergies may require you to provide your cat with a prescription diet or even home-cooked meals free of the offending allergens. Your veterinarian will provide recommendations as to the best course of action.

It is possible that your cat will need dietary supplements to ensure he gets every the vital nutrients he needs.

Medication
Medication is sometimes prescribed for cats in case certain allergens cannot be removed from the environment. Medications include:

  1. Antihistamines as a preventative
  2. Cortisone, steroids or allergy injections for airborne pollens
  3. Flea prevention products

How do allergies affect asthma?
If your cat is allergic to environmental pollutants, it may worsen your cat’s asthma. In this case, your vet may prescribe medications that open your cat’s airway for the short-term; endless term solutions include corticosteroids.

And here’s a excellent reminder: cigarette smoke is bad for your cat, especially if your cat has asthma.

If you own any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian – they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.


What can cause cats to itch other than fleas?

Important causes of pruritus other than fleas include:

  1. Food intolerance/allergy
  2. Ear mites and other mites
  3. Atopy (house dust and pollen allergy)
  4. Insect bites
  5. Bacterial infections

Other mites

Harvest mites are a recognised cause of skin disease in cats in some areas in tardy summer and autumn – see harvest mite infection in cats.

These tiny orange dot sized mites are visible to the naked eye and generally found between the toes and in Henry’s pocket of the ear flap.

In some parts of the world, the mites Noedres cati and Sarcoptes scabiei may be found on cats and may be a cause of intense pruritus.

Ear mites – Otodectes cynotis

Ear mites are well known as the major cause of otitis externa (ear inflammation) in young cats and in breeding colonies – see common ear problems in cats. However, it is also possible for the mites to wander onto the skin around the head and neck and cause pruritic skin disease at these sites.

As cats sleep curled up, spread of infection (and subsequent dermatitis) to the rump and tail may also occur.

Insect bites

Insects such as wasps and bees can cause stings that lead to dramatic, painful and swollen skin. However, some other insects including fleas, midges, flies and mosquitoes may bite and the reaction to the bite (or the insect saliva) may cause intense irritation and pruritus. Flying insects generally bite relatively hairless areas such as the bridge of the nose and ears. Notably, mosquitoes own been reported to cause an eosinophilic granuloma-like reaction on the bridge of the nose of some cats (mosquito-bite hypersensitivity).

Food intolerance or allergy

No-one knows the exact mechanisms by which certain foods can make animals and humans itch.

Allergy may be involved, but in some cases, it is possible that the pruritus may result from chemical reactions to the food or to additives and preservatives.

However, it is well recognised that changing the diet to a food that cats own not previously been exposed to can cure some cases of pruritic skin disease. Most of these are probably food allergies but the terms ‘food intolerance’ or ‘food-responsive’ skin disease are sometimes used as a specific diagnosis is often not made.

Cats may need to be fed an alternative diet for a period of 6-8 weeks to law out food-response dermatitis, and the choice of food is significant. This is not simply switching one brand of cat food for another, as the ingredients are often extremely similar.

Your vet will advise you on the most appropriate diet to use – this might be a home-prepared diet, or your vet may propose a special ‘hypoallergenic’ diet for the trial period. Numerous cats also hunt or may be fed by neighbours, which can complicate the trial as it is significant that no other foods are eaten during the trial period.

Atopy (atopic dermatitis; dust and pollen allergy)

Atopy is not well characterised in cats. In humans and dogs, the term is strictly used to describe an inherited predisposition to develop allergic reactions to environmental allergens (such as pollen and home dust).

Allergies to pollen and home dust happen in cats, and may be a potential cause of pruritus, but they are hard to diagnose and it is unknown whether there is an inherited component to the disease.

In most cats, atopy is diagnosed by ruling out other potential causes of pruritus, including fleas and other parasites, and food. Allergy testing can be performed on cats (for example intra-derma skin tests) but the results are rather unreliable. Blood tests are also offered by some laboratories to ‘diagnose’ atopy and the underlying cause of the allergy, but these are less dependable than skin tests, and both untrue positive and untrue negative tests are well recognised.

Atopy is incurable and life-long medication is needed to prevent unacceptable discomfort.

Treatment with essential fatty acids and anti-histamines is successful in only a minority of cases. Numerous cats need long-term corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin. If an allergy test has successfully identified the offending allergen, then it is possible to use a ‘hyposensitisation vaccine’ as a therapy – these rarely resolve the disease but in some cases reduce the need for drug therapy.

Bacterial skin infections (pyoderma) and fungal (yeast) infections

Although bacterial skin disease in cats is unusual, it may happen and there are occasional cases of spectacular recovery following antibiotic treatment in pruritic cats.

This is unusual, but more work is needed in this area.

Dermatophytosis (infection with a dermatophyte fungal organism) is not generally pruritic, but skin infection with yeasts (Malassezia) can be a problem in some cats – this is often secondary to allergic skin disease, but the yeasts may also contribute to the pruritus.

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Millions of people enjoy sharing their homes and their lives with pets, even those who are allergic to animals. Unfortunately, some people believe that once they are diagnosed with a pet allergy, they own no choice but to remove their pets from their family.

Thankfully, there are numerous solutions that can be explored that would permit an allergy sufferer to hold their beloved pets while successfully managing their allergies. You’d be surprised to know how numerous people with allergies that aren’t life-threatening are capable to live happily with their pets.

In numerous cases, the benefits of having a pet outweigh the drawbacks of pet allergies.


Manifestations of feline pruritus

Common manifestations of pruritic skin disease in cats include:

  1. Overt itching, scratching and self-induced skin damage
  2. ‘Miliary’ dermatitis – this form of skin disease is characterised by the presence of tiny 2-3 mm diameter crusts throughout the body surface.

    The skin and jacket may also be greasy and own excessive dandruff

  3. Symmetrical hair loss
  4. Eosinophilic granuloma complicated – see eosinophilic granuloma complicated in cats – this is a variety of skin lesions (indolent ulcer that affects the upper lip, and eosinophilic plagues or eosinophilic granulomas that can affect various areas of the body and also the oral cavity. They are generally associated with allergies. Every of these manifestations of pruritus glance completely diverse, but can every be caused by the same things — in most instances the cause is fleas but other parasites and allergies can be involved.

    Some cats may own more than one manifestation of disease present simultaneously eg, indolent ulcer and symmetrical hair loss.


Understand your pet allergies

It is significant to see a doctor and be tested to determine what allergies you actually own. You may discover that you’re allergic to something else and not your pet at all! For example, you may assume that you are allergic to your beloved dog, only to discover out through an allergy test that you’re actually allergic to a specific tree pollen that got on his fur during a stroll together, and that’s actually what’s bothering you.

If an allergy test shows that you are allergic to your pet, it is significant to understand what causes your allergic reaction to them.

There are allergy-triggering proteins called allergens in saliva and skin glands that cling to an animal’s dry skin (dander) and fur. The fur and dander then stick to walls, carpets and clothing.

The reaction of someone to these allergens is diverse from one person to the next. The reaction may range from mild sniffling and sneezing to life-threatening asthma. The reaction can be made worse if a person is additionally exposed to other things he is allergic too, such as pollen, dust mites, cigarette smoke, and mold.

Whether someone has an allergic reaction depends on both the individual person and the individual animal.

A person with animal allergies may react less to dogs with soft, constantly growing hair, or one specific cat or dog may cause more or less of an allergic reaction than another animal of that same breed.

You may hear claims about breeds of dogs and cats that are non-allergenic (don’t cause an allergic reaction) or cats and dogs that are hypoallergenic (cause less of an allergic reaction). However, even hairless breeds may cause a severe allergic reaction.


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