What kind of medicine for skin allergy

Eye allergies are common. Eye allergies are a reaction to indoor and outdoor allergens that get into your eyes.The tissue that lines the inside of the eyelid and exterior of the eyeball becomes inflamed and swollen and leads to itching, redness, tearing and irritation of the eyes.


What Is Anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis) is a severe allergic reaction that can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. It happens quick and may cause death. Symptoms generally involve more than one part of the body, such as the skin or mouth, the lungs, the heart and the gut.

Study more about anaphylaxis.


Treating severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis)

Some people with severe allergies may experience life-threatening reactions, known as anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock.

If you’re at risk of this, you’ll be given special injectors containing a medicine called adrenaline to use in an emergency.

If you develop symptoms of anaphylaxis, such as difficulty breathing, you should inject yourself in the outer thigh before seeking emergency medical assist.

Find out more about treating anaphylaxis


Immunotherapy (desensitisation) 

Immunotherapy may be an option for a little number of people with certain severe and persistent allergies who are unable to control their symptoms using the measures above.

The treatment involves being given occasional little doses of the allergen, either as an injection, or as drops or tablets under the tongue, over the course of several years.

The injection can only be performed in a specialist clinic under the supervision of a doctor, as there’s a little risk of a severe reaction.

The drops or tablets can generally be taken at home.

The purpose of treatment is to help your body get used to the allergen so it does not react to it so severely.

This will not necessarily cure your allergy, but it’ll make it milder and mean you can take less medicine.


Allergy medicines

Medicines for mild allergies are available from pharmacies without a prescription.

But always enquire a pharmacist or GP for advice before starting any new medicine, as they’re not suitable for everyone.

Decongestants

Decongestants can be used as a short-term treatment for a blocked nose caused by an allergic reaction.

They can be taken as tablets, capsules, nasal sprays or liquids.

Do not use them for more than a week at a time, as using them for endless periods can make your symptoms worse.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are the main medicines for allergies.

What helpful of medicine for skin allergy

They can be used:

  1. as and when you notice the symptoms of an allergic reaction
  2. to prevent allergic reactions – for example, you may take them in the morning if you own hay fever and you know the pollen count is high that day

Antihistamines can be taken as tablets, capsules, creams, liquids, eye drops or nasal sprays, depending on which part of your body is affected by your allergy.

Lotions and creams

Red and itchy skin caused by an allergic reaction can sometimes be treated with over-the-counter creams and lotions, such as:

  1. calamine lotion to reduce itchiness
  2. moisturising creams (emollients) to hold the skin moist and protect it from allergens
  3. steroids to reduce inflammation

Steroids

Steroid medicines can assist reduce inflammation caused by an allergic reaction.

They’re available as:

Sprays, drops and feeble steroid creams are available without a prescription.

What helpful of medicine for skin allergy

Stronger creams, inhalers and tablets are available on prescription from a GP.


Avoiding exposure to allergens

The best way to hold your symptoms under control is often to avoid the things you’re allergic to, although this is not always practical.

For example, you may be capable to help manage:

  1. mould allergies by keeping your home dry and well-ventilated, and dealing with any damp and condensation
  2. animal allergies by keeping pets exterior as much as possible and washing them regularly
  3. food allergies by being careful about what you eat
  4. hay fever by staying indoors and avoiding grassy areas when the pollen count is high
  5. dust mite allergies by using allergy-proof duvets and pillows, and fitting wooden floors rather than carpets


Treating specific allergic conditions

Use the links under to discover information about how specific allergies and related conditions are treated:

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

There are 2 types of contact dermatitis.

Irritant dermatitis: This is the most common type.

It is not caused by an allergy, but rather the skin’s reaction to irritating substances or friction. Irritating substances may include acids, alkaline materials such as soaps and detergents, fabric softeners, solvents, or other chemicals. Extremely irritating chemicals may cause a reaction after just a short period of contact. Milder chemicals can also cause a reaction after repeated contact.

People who own atopic dermatitis are at increased risk of developing irritant contact dermatitis.

Common materials that may irritate your skin include:

  1. Long-term exposure to wet diapers
  2. Hair dyes
  3. Cement
  4. Pesticides or weed killers
  5. Rubber gloves
  6. Shampoos

Allergic contact dermatitis: This form of the condition occurs when your skin comes in contact with a substance that causes you to own an allergic reaction.

Common allergens include:

  1. Nail polish, hair dyes, and permanent wave solutions.
  2. Fabrics and clothing, including both materials and dyes.
  3. Antibiotics, such as neomycin rubbed on the surface of the skin.
  4. Balsam of Peru (used in numerous personal products and cosmetics, as well as in numerous foods and drinks).
  5. Preservatives commonly used in prescription and over-the-counter topical medicines.
  6. Adhesives, including those used for untrue eyelashes or toupees.
  7. Fragrances in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps, and moisturizers.
  8. Nickel or other metals (found in jewelry, watch straps, metal zips, bra hooks, buttons, pocketknives, lipstick holders, and powder compacts).
  9. Poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac, and other plants.
  10. Rubber or latex gloves or shoes.
  11. Formaldehyde, which is used in a wide number of manufactured items.

You will not own a reaction to a substance when you are first exposed to the substance. However, you will form a reaction after future exposures. You may become more sensitive and develop a reaction if you use it regularly. It is possible to tolerate the substance for years or even decades before developing allergy.

What helpful of medicine for skin allergy

Once you develop an allergy you will be allergic for life.

The reaction most often occurs 24 to 48 hours after the exposure. The rash may persist for weeks after the exposure stops.

Some products cause a reaction only when the skin is also exposed to sunlight (photosensitivity). These include:

  1. Sulfa ointments
  2. Sunscreens
  3. Shaving lotions
  4. Some perfumes
  5. Coal tar products
  6. Oil from the skin of a lime

A few airborne allergens, such as ragweed, perfumes, vapor from nail lacquer, or insecticide spray, can also cause contact dermatitis.

What Are the Symptoms of an Allergy?

An allergy occurs when the body’s immune system sees a substance as harmful and overreacts to it.

The symptoms that result are an allergic reaction. The substances that cause allergic reactions are allergens. Allergens can get into your body numerous ways to cause an allergic reaction.

  1. You can ingest allergens by mouth. This includes food and medicines you eat or swallow.
  2. You can inhale allergens into your nose and your lungs. Many are little enough to float through the air.

    What helpful of medicine for skin allergy

    Examples are pollen, home dust, mold spores, cat and dog dander and latex dust.

  3. Your body can own allergens injected into it. This includes medicine given by needle and venom from insect stings and bites.

    What helpful of medicine for skin allergy

  4. Your skin can absorb allergens. Plants such as poison ivy, sumac and oak can cause reactions when touched. Latex, metals, and ingredients in beauty care and household products are other examples.


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What kind of medicine for skin allergy