What is the strongest allergy medicine available

Before taking an antihistamine, tell your doctor about every medical conditions you own, especially:

Don’t drive or act out activities that require alertness until you know how the antihistamine you’re taking affects you.

Follow the instructions on your prescription or package label carefully when taking an antihistamine. Don’t take more of the medicine than is recommended.

Tell your doctor about every prescription, non-prescription, illegal, recreational, herbal, nutritional, or dietary drugs you’re taking before starting on an antihistamine.

You may need to avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice while taking an antihistamine, as they can affect how these drugs work in your body.

Talk to your doctor if this is a concern.


Types of Antihistamines

Some common antihistamines include:


Antihistamines and Alcohol

Alcohol may worsen certain side effects of antihistamines.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking these medicines.


Antihistamines and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant, or might become pregnant, while using an antihistamine.

You’ll own to discuss the risks and benefits of taking the medicine during pregnancy.

Also, talk to your healthcare provider before taking antihistamines if you’re breastfeeding.


Prescription Allergy Pills

Allergic reactions can include rhinitis (inflammation of the nasal passages, also known as "hay fever"); asthma; skin allergies; or rarely, anaphylaxis, which is a potentially fatal allergic reaction that requires emergency treatment and may produce vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing or a drop in blood pressure.

After obtaining your medical history and conducting a thorough examination, your physician can determine whether your difficulties do indeed stem from allergies; if so, your physician can offer you one or more of the following options for relieving your symptoms:

Corticosteroids

Corticosteroids are anti-inflammatory medicines come in several forms, including nasal sprays love Flonase (fluticasone). Corticosteroids also come as inhalers, pills, and injections.

Inhalers are often prescribed for the long-term management of allergy-induced asthma. Topical creams and ointments are used to treat skin-related allergy symptoms.

Potent Corticosteroid Drugs Tame Inflammation Quickly

Prescription-Strength Antihistamines and Decongestants

Prescription-strength antihistamines and decongestants are often the same strength as OTC varieties. Clarinex (desloratadine) is only available with a prescription.

Bronchodilators

Bronchodilators are available as inhalers, pills, liquids, and injections to treat asthma.

Anti-Leukotrienes

Medications love Singulair (montelukast sodium) are anti-leukotrienes, which are used to treat allergic rhinitis as well as asthma by fighting chemicals called leukotrienes, which increase inflammation.

Anti-Immunoglobulin (IgE) Antibodies

People with severe, persistent asthma due to allergies may benefit from anti-IgE antibody injections, which prevent the release of histamine. These antibodies also cause the symptoms of rhinitis, but their use for that condition has not been approved because of the availability of other, less-expensive remedies that do not require injections.

Your doctor or physician can also refer you to an allergist for further examination.

An allergist can act out allergy skin or blood tests and give allergy shots if needed.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial policy to study more about how we fact-check and hold our content precise, dependable, and trustworthy.

  • "Frequently Asked Questions About Allergy Medication." nationaljewish.org. Feb. 2006. National Jewish Health.
  • Williams DM. Clinical Pharmacology of Corticosteroids.Respir Care. 2018;63(6):655-670. doi:10.4187/respcare.06314

  • "Tips to Remember: Asthma and Allergy Medications." aaaai.org.

    2007. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

  • Pelaia G, Canonica GW, Matucci A, Paolini R, Triggiani M, Paggiaro P. Targeted therapy in severe asthma today: focus on immunoglobulin E. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2017;11:1979-1987. doi: 10.2147/DDDT.S130743

  • "Allergies." ils.nlm.nih.gov. 15 Feb. 2007. National Institutes of Health.
  • "Step 9: Types of Allergy Medication." unm.edu. 7 Oct. 2007. University of Maryland Medical Center.
  • "When Should I See an Allergist?" acaai.org. Nov. 2004. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Additional Reading

  1. "Frequently Asked Questions About Allergy Medication." nationaljewish.org.

    Feb. 2006. National Jewish Health.

  2. "Allergies." ils.nlm.nih.gov. 15 Feb. 2007. National Institutes of Health.
  3. "Tips to Remember: Asthma and Allergy Medications." aaaai.org. 2007. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.
  4. "Step 9: Types of Allergy Medication." unm.edu. 7 Oct. 2007. University of Maryland Medical Center.
  5. "When Should I See an Allergist?" acaai.org. Nov.

    What is the strongest allergy medicine available

    2004. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

There's a larger game in frolic in the Newark courtroom, too, according to the generic companies, and it became more exciting a few weeks ago. As Schering-Plough holds the generics at bay with one hand, it had hoped to get F.D.A. approval in time to introduce desloratadine, its second-generation version of Claritin that will be marketed as Clarinex, this spring. ''The longer the litigation is dragged out,'' says Elliot F. Hahn, president of Andrx, ''the more chance they own to market desloratadine to physicians and switch them from the Claritin line to the desloratadine line.'' But that plan ran into a major snag in mid-February, when Schering-Plough revealed that the approval of desloratadine was being held up until the company corrects manufacturing deficiencies cited by the F.D.A.

at four of its plants.

What to do in a crisis? Market! Several days later, as the company's stock plunged and attorneys hustled to organize shareholder lawsuits, Schering-Plough announced large new ''consumer education'' and pharmacy programs for Claritin — the ''largest and most comprehensive allergy initiative of its kind.'' The company plans to distribute 35 million free drug samples to doctors, 6 million allergy brochures, 65,000 drugstore displays and, yes, 350 million more of those little blue pharmacy bags.

Finally, an edifying case of sticker shock.

Tardy final drop, my allergist prescribed a month's supply of Claritin-D to clear up some congestion before I started my first circular of allergy desensitization shots. The pharmacy had misplaced my insurance number, so when I went to pick up the prescription, the clerk handed me a bill for $103. This is the consumer's trickle-down tab for the roughly $250 million in drug development, more than $100 million a year in consumer advertising, numerous millions in closed-door marketing, $20 million in lobbying and political contributions, $5 million a year for litigation.

I was stunned that it was so expensive, and I asked myself a question that is a normal part of every marketplace but health care.

What is the strongest allergy medicine available

If I had to pay $103 out of my own pocket, would I purchase this medicine? Was it worth it?

With the exception of elderly people on Medicare and the uninsured, most of us never enquire that question. In a recent conversation, Gillian Shepherd, a Manhattan allergy specialist, addressed the same point, noting that antihistamines love Claritin and Allegra are about equal in potency to over-the-counter drugs love Chlor-Trimeton. And while some patients experience sedation with these drugs, numerous do not. ''Fifty percent of the population can tolerate most of them without any sedation,'' she explained.

''The feeling is that if there's a chance of sedation and third parties are paying, why not use the nonsedating drugs? If people were paying out of pocket, the tale would be completely different.''

As I labored to sort through every the clinical data and every the confusing advertising, I found myself wishing that we had reviewers who would talk bluntly about new drugs, who could discuss efficacy, safety and worth from the consumer's point of view, who could deconstruct the advertising, who would include cost as a criterion. But those are medical judgments, some would tell, and only doctors should dispense them.

True, but numerous doctors, it turns out, own largely abdicated that responsibility — they rarely know what a drug costs, and as Shepherd mentioned, numerous study about the properties of a given drug not from the medical literature but from company salesmen, who are paid to tell one-sided stories.

And so what? Richard Kogan, Schering's C.E.O., testified before Congress two years ago that drug companies need constant and ample revenue streams to support their huge and dicey R&D enterprise, and he's correct. In order to be competitive in this post-genomic era, large pharmaceutical companies need to spend $2 billion to $4 billion a year on research to develop new drugs.

The industry has developed numerous remarkable medicines, and more are on the way.

But if high drug prices are a helpful of innovation tax for American consumers, we should at least demand innovation in return. Numerous high-priced, successful drugs, love Zyrtec, are developed overseas and simply marketed here by American companies. Moreover, a significant quantity of pharmaceutical innovation currently occurs in the biotech sector, where little, cutting-edge companies typically license their discoveries to large pharma, which has the marketing expertise.

What innovative new drugs does Schering, for example, own in the pipeline, subsidized by the billions of dollars earned from Claritin? Financial analysts are mixed on the company's potential treatments — for cancer, asthma, high cholesterol and several other major diseases — but a leading candidate for future blockbuster status is . . . desloratadine, the chemical that is the principal metabolite, or breakdown product, of Claritin. Anyone who has taken Claritin has already had desloratadine in his or her body.

By blocking the effects of histamines, this class of drugs can treat allergies and numerous other ailments.

An antihistamine is a type of medicine used to treat common allergy symptoms, such as sneezing, watery eyes, hives, and a runny nose.

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, nasal allergies affect about 50 million people in the United States.

Certain antihistamines are also sometimes used to treat motion sickness, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, cough, sleep problems, anxiety, and Parkinson’s disease.

The drugs work by blocking the effects of histamine, a substance in the body that can cause allergy symptoms.

Antihistamines come in diverse forms, such as capsules, tablets, liquids, eye drops, injections, and nasal sprays.

They can be purchased over-the-counter (OTC) or given as a prescription.

Some antihistamines are taken daily, while others are used only when symptoms occur.

Additional Reading

  1. "Frequently Asked Questions About Allergy Medication." nationaljewish.org.

    Feb. 2006. National Jewish Health.

  2. "Allergies." ils.nlm.nih.gov. 15 Feb. 2007. National Institutes of Health.
  3. "Tips to Remember: Asthma and Allergy Medications." aaaai.org. 2007. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.
  4. "Step 9: Types of Allergy Medication." unm.edu. 7 Oct. 2007. University of Maryland Medical Center.
  5. "When Should I See an Allergist?" acaai.org. Nov. 2004. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

There's a larger game in frolic in the Newark courtroom, too, according to the generic companies, and it became more exciting a few weeks ago.

As Schering-Plough holds the generics at bay with one hand, it had hoped to get F.D.A. approval in time to introduce desloratadine, its second-generation version of Claritin that will be marketed as Clarinex, this spring. ''The longer the litigation is dragged out,'' says Elliot F. Hahn, president of Andrx, ''the more chance they own to market desloratadine to physicians and switch them from the Claritin line to the desloratadine line.'' But that plan ran into a major snag in mid-February, when Schering-Plough revealed that the approval of desloratadine was being held up until the company corrects manufacturing deficiencies cited by the F.D.A.

at four of its plants.

What to do in a crisis? Market! Several days later, as the company's stock plunged and attorneys hustled to organize shareholder lawsuits, Schering-Plough announced large new ''consumer education'' and pharmacy programs for Claritin — the ''largest and most comprehensive allergy initiative of its kind.'' The company plans to distribute 35 million free drug samples to doctors, 6 million allergy brochures, 65,000 drugstore displays and, yes, 350 million more of those little blue pharmacy bags.

Finally, an edifying case of sticker shock.

Tardy final drop, my allergist prescribed a month's supply of Claritin-D to clear up some congestion before I started my first circular of allergy desensitization shots. The pharmacy had misplaced my insurance number, so when I went to pick up the prescription, the clerk handed me a bill for $103. This is the consumer's trickle-down tab for the roughly $250 million in drug development, more than $100 million a year in consumer advertising, numerous millions in closed-door marketing, $20 million in lobbying and political contributions, $5 million a year for litigation.

I was stunned that it was so expensive, and I asked myself a question that is a normal part of every marketplace but health care. If I had to pay $103 out of my own pocket, would I purchase this medicine? Was it worth it?

With the exception of elderly people on Medicare and the uninsured, most of us never enquire that question. In a recent conversation, Gillian Shepherd, a Manhattan allergy specialist, addressed the same point, noting that antihistamines love Claritin and Allegra are about equal in potency to over-the-counter drugs love Chlor-Trimeton.

And while some patients experience sedation with these drugs, numerous do not. ''Fifty percent of the population can tolerate most of them without any sedation,'' she explained. ''The feeling is that if there's a chance of sedation and third parties are paying, why not use the nonsedating drugs? If people were paying out of pocket, the tale would be completely different.''

As I labored to sort through every the clinical data and every the confusing advertising, I found myself wishing that we had reviewers who would talk bluntly about new drugs, who could discuss efficacy, safety and worth from the consumer's point of view, who could deconstruct the advertising, who would include cost as a criterion.

What is the strongest allergy medicine available

But those are medical judgments, some would tell, and only doctors should dispense them. True, but numerous doctors, it turns out, own largely abdicated that responsibility — they rarely know what a drug costs, and as Shepherd mentioned, numerous study about the properties of a given drug not from the medical literature but from company salesmen, who are paid to tell one-sided stories.

And so what? Richard Kogan, Schering's C.E.O., testified before Congress two years ago that drug companies need constant and ample revenue streams to support their huge and dicey R&D enterprise, and he's correct.

In order to be competitive in this post-genomic era, large pharmaceutical companies need to spend $2 billion to $4 billion a year on research to develop new drugs. The industry has developed numerous remarkable medicines, and more are on the way.

But if high drug prices are a helpful of innovation tax for American consumers, we should at least demand innovation in return.

What is the strongest allergy medicine available

Numerous high-priced, successful drugs, love Zyrtec, are developed overseas and simply marketed here by American companies. Moreover, a significant quantity of pharmaceutical innovation currently occurs in the biotech sector, where little, cutting-edge companies typically license their discoveries to large pharma, which has the marketing expertise. What innovative new drugs does Schering, for example, own in the pipeline, subsidized by the billions of dollars earned from Claritin? Financial analysts are mixed on the company's potential treatments — for cancer, asthma, high cholesterol and several other major diseases — but a leading candidate for future blockbuster status is .

. . desloratadine, the chemical that is the principal metabolite, or breakdown product, of Claritin. Anyone who has taken Claritin has already had desloratadine in his or her body.

By blocking the effects of histamines, this class of drugs can treat allergies and numerous other ailments.

An antihistamine is a type of medicine used to treat common allergy symptoms, such as sneezing, watery eyes, hives, and a runny nose.

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, nasal allergies affect about 50 million people in the United States.

Certain antihistamines are also sometimes used to treat motion sickness, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, cough, sleep problems, anxiety, and Parkinson’s disease.

The drugs work by blocking the effects of histamine, a substance in the body that can cause allergy symptoms.

Antihistamines come in diverse forms, such as capsules, tablets, liquids, eye drops, injections, and nasal sprays.

They can be purchased over-the-counter (OTC) or given as a prescription.

Some antihistamines are taken daily, while others are used only when symptoms occur.


Antihistamine Side Effects

Common side effects of antihistamines include:

  1. Increased appetite and weight gain
  2. Drowsiness or sleepiness
  3. Upset stomach
  4. Dizziness
  5. Dry mouth, nose, or throat
  6. Thickening of mucus
  7. Changes in vision
  8. Feeling nervous, excited, or irritable


RELATED VIDEO: