What is the most effective over the counter allergy medicine

The way to avoid allergic reactions is to hold away from allergens, if possible.

People with food allergies need to be careful about how food has been packaged and prepared. Cross-contamination can happen where a little quantity of an allergen ends up in a dish. A restaurant serving a peanut sauce, for example, might own peanut residue on a kitchen utensil as a result of improperly cleaning.

Allergens love dust and pollen are hard to avoid.

What is the most effective over the counter allergy medicine

Frequently cleaning household surfaces and clothing can assist. Furry pets can carry allergens in their coats, so bathing them regularly can hold allergies at bay.

Investing in an air purifier with a HEPA filter may offer relief from airborne allergens. Regularly changing air-conditioning filters and keeping windows closed will reduce the quantity of pollen that enters the home.

The allergy medications in this article are available online.

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Chronic allergies affect millions of people around the globe, and there’s no denying the discomfort they cause. A 2017 study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has found that 80 percent of those with seasonal allergies report moderate-to-severe symptoms that significantly impair their quality of life. But although allergies can’t be cured outright, those afflicted can take over-the-counter medications to alleviate some of the symptoms, which may include sneezing, runny nose, coughing and water eyes.

According to Laura Moore, MD, allergist-immunologist at the Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Middle of Alaska, allergy medications available today can be broken below into the three main categories: oral antihistamines, nasal steroids, and eye drops.

Individuals who suffer from allergies may take one medication from each category (nasal steroid, eye drop, and oral antihistamine) at the same time, says Dr.

Moore. However, you should never double up (i.e. use multiple nasal steroids together).

What is the most effective over the counter allergy medicine

If symptoms persist, it’s best to schedule an appointment with an allergist. You might require prescription treatment options and/or immunotherapy.

But for most people, a regimen of over-the-counter allergy medications can assist. Here’s what you need to know.


Oral Antihistamines

According to Moore, oral antihistamines can be excellent for combatting those common allergy symptoms such as sneezing, itching, and watery/drippy nose and eyes. And fortunately, most people own no issue tolerating these medications. They can be taken daily or as needed. However, before popping a pill, make certain you glance carefully to see if it could make you drowsy so you take it at the appropriate times.

Here are the four main long-acting oral antihistamines available over-the-counter:



As of 2017[update] brands included: Actalor, Actidin, Aerotina, Alaspan, Alavert, Albatrina, Alerdina, Alerfast, Alergan, Alergiano, Alergiatadina, Alergin Ariston, Alergipan, Alergit, Alergitrat L, Aleric Lora, Alermuc, Alernitis, Alerpriv, Alertadin, Alertine, Aleze, Algac, Algecare, Algistop, Alledryl, Aller-Tab, Allerfre, Allerget, Allergex Non Drowsy, Allergyx, Allerhis, Allernon, Allerta, Allertyn, Allohex, Allor, Allorat, Alloris, Alor, Analor, Anhissen, Anti-Sneeze, Antial, Antil, Antimin, Ao Hui Feng, Ao Mi Xin, Ao Shu, Ardin, Atinac, Avotyne, Axcel Loratadine, Bai Wei Le, Bang Nuo, Bedix, Belodin, Benadryl, Besumin, Bi Sai Ning, Bi Yan Tong, Biliranin, Biloina, Biolorat, Bollinol, Boots Hayfever Relief, Boots Hooikoortstabletten, Boots Once-a-Day Allergy Relief, Carin, Carinose, Chang Ke, Civeran, Clara, Claratyne, Clarid, Clarihis, Clarihist, Clarilerg, Clarinese, Claritin, Claritine, Clarityne, Clarityne SP, Clarotadine, Clatatin, Clatine, Clear-Atadine, Clear-Atadine Children’s, Clistin, Contral, Cronitin, Da Sheng Rui Li, Dao Min Qi, Dayhist, Debimin, Desa, Devedryl, Dexitis, Dimegan, Dimens, Dimetapp Children’s ND Non-Drowsy Allergy, Doliallérgie Loratadine, Effectine, Eladin, Elo, Emilora, Encilor, Eradex, Erolin, Ezede, Fei Ge Man, Finska, Flonidan, Flonidan Control, Florgan, Folerin, Frenaler, Fristamin, Fu Lai Xi, Fucole Minlife, Genadine, Glodin, Gradine, Halodin, Helporigin, Hisplex, Histaclar, Histafax, Histalor, Horestyl, Hua Chang, Hysticlar, Igir, Immunix, Immunex, Inclarin, Inversyn, Jin Su Rui, Jing Wei, Ke Mi, Klarihist, Klinset, Klodin, Kui Yin, Lallergy, Larotin, Latoren, Laura, LD, Lei Ning, Lesidas, Liberec, Lisaler, Logadine, Logista, Lohist, Lolergi, Lolergy, Lomidine, Lomilan, Loptame, Lora, Lora-Lich, Lora-Mepha Allergie, Loracare, Loracil, Loraclear, Loradad, Loraderm, Loradin, Loradine, Lorado Pollen, Loradon, Lorafix, Lorahexal, Lorahist, Lorakids, Loralab-D, Loralerg, Loralivio, Loramax, Loramin, Loramine, Loran, Lorange, Loranil, Lorano, Loranox, Lorantis, LoraPaed, Lorastad, Lorastamin, Lorastine, Lorastyne, Lorat, Loratab, Loratadim, Loratadin, Loratadina, Loratadine, Loratadinum, Loratadyna, Loratan, Loratin, Loraton, Loratrim, Loratyne, Lorchimin, Lordamin, Lordinex, Loremex, Loremix, Lorfast, Lorid, Loridin, Lorihis, Lorimox, Lorin, Lorine, Loristal, Lorita, Loritex, Loritin, Lorly, Lormeg, Lorsedin, Lortadine, Losta, Lostop, Lotadin, Lotadine, Lotarin, Lotin, Megalorat, Mildin, Min Li Ke, Minlife, Mintapp, Mosedin, Mudantil L, Nasaler, Neoday, Niltro, Non-Drowsy Allergy Relief, Nosedin, Noseling, Novacloxab, NT-Alergi, Nufalora, Nularef, Numark Allergy, Omega, Oradin, Oradine, Oramine, Orin, Orinil, Pollentyme, Pressing, Pretin, Primorix, Profadine, Pulmosan Aller, Pylor, Rahistin, Ralinet, Ramitin, Refenax, Restamine, Rhinigine, Rihest, Rinalor, Rinconad, Rinityn, Rinolan, Riprazo, Rityne, Roletra, Rotadin, Rui Fu, Run Lai, Rupton, Sensibit, She Tai, Shi Nuo Min, Shi Tai Shu, Shu Rui, Shun Ta Xin, Silora, Sinaler, Sohotin, Soneryl, Sunadine, Symphoral, Tabcin, Tai Ming Ke, Ticevis, Tidilor, Tinnic, Tirlor, Toral, Triaminic, Tricel, Tuulix, Urtilar, Utel, Vagran, Winatin, Xanidine, Xepalodin, Xian Ning, Xin Da Yue, Xing Yuan Jia, XSM, Xue Fei, Yi Fei, Yi Shu Chang, Yibang, Zhengshu, Zhi Min, Zifar, Zoratadine, and Zylohist.[26]

As of 2017[update], in a combination drug with pseudoephedrine, it was available under the brands: Airet, Alavert D-12, Aldisa SR, Alerfast D, Alergical LP, Alergin Plus Ariston, Alerpriv D, Alledryl-D, Allerpid, Aseptobron Descongestivo, Bai Wei Qing, Benadryl 24 D, Ciprocort D, Claridex, Claridon, Clarinase, Clarinase Repetab, Claritine Athletic, Claritin Allergy + Sinus, Clarityne, Clarityne D, Clarityne-D, Clear-Atadine, Coderin, Cronase, De-Cold, Decidex Plus, Decongess I, Defonase, Demazin NS, Dimegan-D, Effectine D, Ephedrol, Fedyclar, Finska-LP, Frenaler-D, Hui Fei Shun, Ke Shuai, Claritin-D, Larotin D, Lertamine, Lohist-Extra, Lora Plus, Loralerg D, Loranil-D, Loratin D, Loratin Plus, Lordinex D, Loremix D, Lorexin-D, Lorfast-D, Loridin-D, Lorinase, Minlife -P, Mosedin plus sr, Narine Repetabs, Nasaler Plus, Nularef-D, Oradin Plus, Pretin-D, Primorix-D, Rhinos SR, QiKe, Rinomex, Sinaler D, Sudamin, Sudolor, Tricel-D, Zhuang Qi, Zoman-D, and Zoratadine-P.[26]

As of 2017[update], in a combination drug with paracetamol, it was available as Sensibit D and in combination with paracetamol and pseudoephedrine, it was available as: Atshi, Clariflu, and Trimed Flu.[26]

As of 2017[update], in a combination drug with betamethasone, it was available as Celestamincort, Celestamine NF, Celestamine NS, Celestamine* L, Ciprocort L, Claricort, Clarityne cort, Corticas L, Cortistamin-L, Histafax Compuesto, Histamino Corteroid L, Labsalerg-B, Lisaler Beta, and Sinaler B, and in combination with betamethadol with available as Nularef Cort.[26]

As of 2017[update], in a combination drug with ambroxol, it was available as Aliviatos, Ambroclar, Antitusivo L Labsa, Bronar, Broncovital, Broquixol, Clarixol, Ideobron, Lorabrox, Lorfast-AM, Sensibit XP, and Toraxan, and in a combination drug with ambroxol and salbutamol as Sibilex.[26]

As of 2017[update], in a combination drug with phenylephrine, it was available as Bramin-Flu, Clarityne D, Clarityne Plus, Clarityne-D, Histafax D, Brafelix, Loramine R, Loraped, Maxiclear Freezing & Nasal, Maxiclear Hayfever & Sinus Relief, and Rinavent, and in combination with phenylephrine and paracetamol it was available as Sensibit D NF.[26]

As of 2017[update], in a combination drug with dexamethasone it was available as Alerfast Forte and Frenaler Forte.[26]

One long-ago summer, I joined the legion of teens helping harvest our valley’s peach crop in western Colorado.

My occupation was to select the best peaches from a bin, wrap each one in tissue, and pack it into a shipping crate. The peach fuzz that coated every surface of the packing shed made my nose stream and my eyelids swell. When I came home after my first day on the occupation, my mom was so alarmed she called the family doctor. Soon the druggist was at the door with a vial of Benadryl (diphenhydramine) tablets. The next morning I was back to normal and back on the occupation. Weeks later, when I collected my pay (including the ½-cent-per-crate bonus for staying until the finish of the harvest), I thanked Benadryl.

Today, I’m grateful my need for that drug lasted only a few weeks.

In a report published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers offers compelling evidence of a link between long-term use of anticholinergic medications love Benadryl and dementia.

Anticholinergic drugs block the action of acetylcholine. This substance transmits messages in the nervous system. In the brain, acetylcholine is involved in learning and memory. In the relax of the body, it stimulates muscle contractions. Anticholinergic drugs include some antihistamines, tricyclic antidepressants, medications to control overactive bladder, and drugs to relieve the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Medications

Many allergens that trigger allergic rhinitis are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them.

If your symptoms can’t be well-controlled by simply avoiding triggers, your allergist may recommend medications that reduce nasal congestion, sneezing, and an itchy and runny nose. They are available in numerous forms — oral tablets, liquid medication, nasal sprays and eyedrops. Some medications may own side effects, so discuss these treatments with your allergist so they can assist you live the life you want.

Decongestants

Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue. They do not contain antihistamines, so they do not cause antihistaminic side effects. They do not relieve other symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

Oral decongestants are available as prescription and nonprescription medications and are often found in combination with antihistamines or other medications. It is not unusual for patients using decongestants to experience insomnia if they take the medication in the afternoon or evening. If this occurs, a dose reduction may be needed. At times, men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on decongestants. Patients using medications to manage emotional or behavioral problems should discuss this with their allergist before using decongestants. Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease should check with their allergist before using.

Pregnant patients should also check with their allergist before starting decongestants.

Nonprescription decongestant nasal sprays work within minutes and final for hours, but you should not use them for more than a few days at a time unless instructed by your allergist. Prolonged use can cause rhinitis medicamentosa, or rebound swelling of the nasal tissue. Stopping the use of the decongestant nasal spray will cure that swelling, provided that there is no underlying disorder.

Oral decongestants are found in numerous over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, and may be the treatment of choice for nasal congestion.

They don’t cause rhinitis medicamentosa but need to be avoided by some patients with high blood pressure. If you own high blood pressure or heart problems, check with your allergist before using them.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications or who experience side effects from medications, who own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or who desire a more permanent solution to their allergies. Immunotherapy can be extremely effective in controlling allergic symptoms, but it doesn’t assist the symptoms produced by nonallergic rhinitis.

Two types of immunotherapy are available: allergy shots and sublingual (under-the-tongue) tablets.

  1. Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached.

    Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish. As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  2. Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in 2014. Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily.

    Treatment can continue for as endless as three years. Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis. These medications counter the effects of histamine, the irritating chemical released within your body when an allergic reaction takes put.

Although other chemicals are involved, histamine is primarily responsible for causing the symptoms. Antihistamines are found in eyedrops, nasal sprays and, most commonly, oral tablets and syrup.

Antihistamines assist to relieve nasal allergy symptoms such as:

  1. Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  2. Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  3. Itchy skin, hives and eczema

There are dozens of antihistamines; some are available over the counter, while others require a prescription. Patients reply to them in a wide variety of ways.

Generally, the newer (second-generation) products work well and produce only minor side effects.

Some people discover that an antihistamine becomes less effective as the allergy season worsens or as their allergies change over time. If you discover that an antihistamine is becoming less effective, tell your allergist, who may recommend a diverse type or strength of antihistamine. If you own excessive nasal dryness or thick nasal mucus, consult an allergist before taking antihistamines. Contact your allergist for advice if an antihistamine causes drowsiness or other side effects.

Proper use: Short-acting antihistamines can be taken every four to six hours, while timed-release antihistamines are taken every 12 to 24 hours.

The short-acting antihistamines are often most helpful if taken 30 minutes before an anticipated exposure to an allergen (such as at a picnic during ragweed season). Timed-release antihistamines are better suited to long-term use for those who need daily medications. Proper use of these drugs is just as significant as their selection. The most effective way to use them is before symptoms develop. A dose taken early can eliminate the need for numerous later doses to reduce established symptoms. Numerous times a patient will tell that he or she “took one, and it didn’t work.” If the patient had taken the antihistamine regularly for three to four days to build up blood levels of the medication, it might own been effective.

Side effects: Older (first-generation) antihistamines may cause drowsiness or performance impairment, which can lead to accidents and personal injury.

Even when these medications are taken only at bedtime, they can still cause considerable impairment the following day, even in people who do not feel drowsy. For this reason, it is significant that you do not drive a car or work with dangerous machinery when you take a potentially sedating antihistamine. Some of the newer antihistamines do not cause drowsiness.

A frequent side effect is excessive dryness of the mouth, nose and eyes.

Less common side effects include restlessness, nervousness, overexcitability, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, euphoria, fainting, visual disturbances, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distress, constipation, diarrhea, increased or decreased urination, urinary retention, high or low blood pressure, nightmares (especially in children), sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, chest tightness or palpitations.

Men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on antihistamines. Consult your allergist if these reactions occur.

Important precautions:

  1. Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  2. While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  3. Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  4. Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  5. Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  6. Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  7. Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy.

    Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.

  8. Never take anyone else’s medication.

Intranasal corticosteroids

Intranasal corticosteroids are the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis. They can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Ask your allergist about whether these medications are appropriate and safe for you. These sprays are designed to avoid the side effects that may happen from steroids that are taken by mouth or injection. Take care not to spray the medication against the middle portion of the nose (the nasal septum).

The most common side effects are local irritation and nasal bleeding. Some older preparations own been shown to own some effect on children’s growth; data about some newer steroids don’t indicate an effect on growth.

Nasal sprays

Nonprescription saline nasal sprays will assist counteract symptoms such as dry nasal passages or thick nasal mucus. Unlike decongestant nasal sprays, a saline nasal spray can be used as often as it is needed. Sometimes an allergist may recommend washing (douching) the nasal passage. There are numerous OTC delivery systems for saline rinses, including neti pots and saline rinse bottles.

Nasal cromolyn blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances.

It does not work in every patients. The full dose is four times daily, and improvement of symptoms may take several weeks. Nasal cromolyn can assist prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure.

Nasal ipratropium bromide spray can assist reduce nasal drainage from allergic rhinitis or some forms of nonallergic rhinitis.

Leukatriene pathway inhibitors

Leukotriene pathway inhibitors (montelukast, zafirlukast and zileuton) block the action of leukotriene, a substance in the body that can cause symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

These drugs are also used to treat asthma.

Eye allergy preparations and eyedrops

Eye allergy preparations may be helpful when the eyes are affected by the same allergens that trigger rhinitis, causing redness, swelling, watery eyes and itching. OTC eyedrops and oral medications are commonly used for short-term relief of some eye allergy symptoms. They may not relieve every symptoms, though, and prolonged use of some of these drops may actually cause your condition to worsen.

Prescription eyedrops and oral medications also are used to treat eye allergies.

Prescription eyedrops provide both short- and long-term targeted relief of eye allergy symptoms, and can be used to manage them.

Check with your allergist or pharmacist if you are unsure about a specific drug or formula.

Nasal corticosteroids

Nasal corticosteroids are prescription medications that relieve symptoms by reducing the inflammation caused when an allergen is present. Corticosteroid nasal sprays, such as Flonase and Nasacort, can assist relieve nasal stuffiness, sneezing, and a runny nose.

Side effects of nasal corticosteroids include:

  1. foul taste in the mouth
  2. nasal irritation
  3. unpleasant smell in the nose
  4. nosebleeds

Treatments that are not recommended for allergic rhinitis

  1. Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  2. Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.

Medications

There are numerous treatments for allergy relief.

Here are some common classes of medication:

What the study found regarding Benadryl and dementia

A team led by Shelley Gray, a pharmacist at the University of Washington’s School of Pharmacy, tracked almost 3,500 men and women ages 65 and older who took part in Adult Changes in Thought (ACT), a long-term study conducted by the University of Washington and Group Health, a Seattle healthcare system. They used Group Health’s pharmacy records to determine every the drugs, both prescription and over-the-counter, that each participant took the 10 years before starting the study.

Participants’ health was tracked for an average of seven years. During that time, 800 of the volunteers developed dementia. When the researchers examined the use of anticholinergic drugs, they found that people who used these drugs were more likely to own developed dementia as those who didn’t use them. Moreover, dementia risk increased along with the cumulative dose. Taking an anticholinergic for the equivalent of three years or more was associated with a 54% higher dementia risk than taking the same dose for three months or less.

The ACT results add to mounting evidence that anticholinergics aren’t drugs to take long-term if you desire to hold a clear head, and hold your head clear into ancient age.

The body’s production of acetylcholine diminishes with age, so blocking its effects can deliver a double whammy to older people. It’s not surprising that problems with short-term memory, reasoning, and confusion lead the list of side effects of anticholinergic drugs, which also include drowsiness, dry mouth, urine retention, and constipation.

The University of Washington study is the first to include nonprescription drugs.

What is the most effective over the counter allergy medicine

It is also the first to eliminate the possibility that people were taking a tricyclic antidepressant to alleviate early symptoms of undiagnosed dementia; the risk associated with bladder medications was just as high.

“This study is another reminder to periodically assess every of the drugs you’re taking. Glance at each one to determine if it’s really helping,” says Dr. Sarah Berry, a geriatrician and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “For instance, I’ve seen people who own been on anticholinergic medications for bladder control for years and they are completely incontinent.

These drugs obviously aren’t helping.”

Many drugs own a stronger effect on older people than younger people. With age, the kidneys and liver clear drugs more slowly, so drug levels in the blood remain higher for a longer time. People also acquire fat and lose muscle mass with age, both of which change the way that drugs are distributed to and broken below in body tissues. In addition, older people tend to take more prescription and over-the-counter medications, each of which has the potential to suppress or enhance the effectiveness of the others.

Related Information: A Guide to Coping with Alzheimer’s Disease

Avoidance

The first approach in managing seasonal or perennial forms of hay fever should be to avoid the allergens that trigger symptoms.

Outdoor exposure

  1. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  2. Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  3. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  4. Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  5. Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  6. Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.

Indoor exposure

  1. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom.

    Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs. Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least 130 degrees Fahrenheit).

  2. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often. If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.
  3. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home.

    Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.

  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets

  1. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  2. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible. If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.
  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling. Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are effective medications used mainly for hay fever and other allergies.

These medications counter the effects of histamines, a substance made by the body to assist the immune system fight invading substances.

Histamines produce unpleasant symptoms during an allergic reaction, such as sneezing, a runny nose, and itchy eyes.

Antihistamines are available over the counter (OTC) and by prescription. These medications can be in the form of tablets, liquid, nasal sprays, creams, and eye drops.

Older antihistamines, such as Benadryl and Chlor-Trimeton, relieve allergy symptoms but can cause drowsiness.

People should avoid driving while using these medications.

Other common side effects of these older antihistamines include:

Newer antihistamines own fewer side effects and are less likely to cause drowsiness, except Zyrtec. These medications come in tablet form. Brands include Allegra, Alavert, Clarinex, Claritin, Zyrtec, and Xyzal.

Common side effects of these antihistamines include:

  1. a dry nose
  2. dry mouth
  3. a headache
  4. nausea and malaise

Decongestants

Decongestants can assist clear a stuffy nose and sinus congestion. The medications shrink blood vessels in the nose and open up nasal passages.

These medications are often available OTC in pill or spray form.

Examples of decongestants include Afrin Nasal Spray, Sudafed PE, and, behind the pharmacy counter, Sudafed.

Pregnant women and people with high blood pressure are advised not to take decongestants and should speak to their doctor.

Side effects of taking decongestants by mouth may include:

  1. dizziness
  2. headaches
  3. restlessness
  4. nervousness
  5. a headache
  6. dry mouth
  7. trouble sleeping

Side effects of decongestant nasal sprays include:

  1. a dry or runny nose
  2. a temporary burning or stinging sensation in the nose
  3. sneezing

What should you do about Benadryl and the risks of dementia?

In 2008, Indiana University School of Medicine geriatrician Malaz Boustani developed the anticholinergic cognitive burden scale, which ranks these drugs according to the severity of their effects on the mind.

It’s a excellent thought to steer clear of the drugs with high ACB scores, meaning those with scores of 3. “There are so numerous alternatives to these drugs,” says Dr.

What is the most effective over the counter allergy medicine

Berry. For example, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) love citalopram (Celexa) or fluoxetine (Prozac) are excellent alternatives to tricyclic antidepressants.

What is the most effective over the counter allergy medicine

Newer antihistamines such as loratadine (Claritin) can replace diphenhydramine or chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton). Botox injections and cognitive behavioral training can alleviate urge incontinence.

One of the best ways to make certain you’re taking the most effective drugs is to dump every your medications — prescription and nonprescription — into a bag and bring them to your next appointment with your primary care doctor.

Epinephrine

Auto-injectable epinephrine is used to treat a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. This prescription medication is used to reverse potentially fatal symptoms, such as difficulty breathing, throat swelling, a feeble pulse, and hives.

Some brands of these medications include EpiPen or Auvi Q.

Epinephrine is delivered by self-injection.

Its effects are rapid but do not final endless. As a result, a person should seek medical attention to treat anaphylaxis.

Allergy injections, or immunotherapy

Some people with allergies own benefited from allergy shots or immunotherapy that reduce the allergic reaction.

An allergist injects a little quantity of the allergen so the body can develop immunity. The process can be effective in ending an allergy or stopping the progression of a minor allergy into a more serious one.

Immunotherapy treatment takes roughly a year to be effective and is then maintained for another few years.

The side effects of treatment are redness and swelling at the injection site. Some people may experience allergy symptoms, such as a stuffy nose.


Claritin 24-Hour Allergy Tablets


Allergy symptoms

The overreaction of the immune system to an allergen leads to inflammation, and this inflammation is what causes allergy symptoms. Allergy symptoms vary by the type of allergen and how severe the allergic reaction.

People with a skin allergy may own symptoms of redness or a rash after contact with an allergen, such as latex or an ingredient in laundry detergent.

Seasonal allergies or hay fever are extremely common.

Around 10 to 30 percent of people worldwide are affected, and the prevalence of allergies may be increasing.

People with seasonal allergies own symptoms resembling the common freezing, including:

  1. an itchy and runny nose
  2. swollen eyes
  3. coughing
  4. itchy throat
  5. wheezing

People with allergic reactions to foods own diverse symptoms, some of which can be severe:

  1. swelling of lips, mouth, or face
  2. vomiting
  3. hives, a red and itchy rash
  4. diarrhea
  5. stomach cramps
  6. shortness of breath

Some people with severe allergies to foods, bee stings, or medications may experience anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock.

Some of these symptoms include:

  1. narrowing of the airways
  2. a swollen tongue or throat
  3. nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  4. stomach cramps
  5. wheezing and trouble breathing
  6. a feeble and rapid pulse
  7. rash or itching
  8. dizziness or fainting

Anaphylaxis can be fatal, so it is vital to seek medical attention

When to see a doctor

Allergies are often a minor inconvenience, but some can pose a serious threat to health, such as allergic asthma or anaphylaxis.

An allergy specialist can assess and prescribe an appropriate treatment.

The American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI) recommend that people visit an allergist in the following cases:

  1. You regularly discover it hard to catch your breath
  2. You experience hay fever for most of the year.
  3. OTC medications do not reduce allergy symptoms or cause severe side effects.
  4. Allergy symptoms interfere with daily life.


Alternative treatments

There are some alternatives for relieving allergy symptoms.

What is the most effective over the counter allergy medicine

They can be used alone or in combination with the above medications.

Nasal irrigation washes allergens and mucus out of the nose, which can make breathing easier. Saline is poured or gently pushed into the nostrils using a bulb syringe or neti pot.

What is the most effective over the counter allergy medicine

People should use procedures the U.S. Food and Drug istration recommend to avoid getting a sinus infection.

Saline nose spray flushes allergens love pollen and dust out of the nose. These sprays are less irritating than nose spray with medications.

Healthy eating has numerous benefits, including reducing inflammation caused by allergens. Food allergies require avoiding certain foods, but a balanced, nutritious diet can still be achieved.

Popular anti-inflammatory foods include:

  1. avocados
  2. broccoli
  3. turmeric
  4. kale
  5. fish
  6. ginger
  7. watermelon
  8. oregano
  9. cayenne

Cold compresses can also assist with swollen eyes and painful sinuses.


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