What is the general treatment for allergies

Allergy in Children

The bulk of allergic disease occurs in childhood, with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema and food allergy comprising a significant percentage of the workload of doctors dealing with children in primary care and hospital paediatric departments. In a recent large UK survey, 20% of children were reported to own had asthma in the previous year, 18% had allergic rhino conjunctivitis (hay fever) and 16% had eczema. This represents a massive increase in prevalence compared with similar studies in the 1970 s where prevalence rates were 3 fold lower. Of these children 47% had at least two co-existing conditions e.g.

asthma and eczema. Read more…

Rhinitis

Rhinitis means inflammation of the lining of the nose Rhinitis is defined clinically as symptoms of runny nose itching, sneezing and nasal blockage (congestion).. Common causes of rhinitis are allergies which may be seasonal (‘hayfever’) or happen all-year-round (examples include allergy to home dust mite, cats, dogs and moulds).Infections which may be acute or chronic represent another common cause. Rhinitis (whether due to allergic or other causes) is a risk factor for the development of asthma. Rhinitis is also implicated in otitis media with effusion and in sinusitis which should rightly be termed rhinosinusitis since sinus inflammation almost always involves the nasal passages as well.

Read more…

Food Allergy and Food Intolerance

If someone reacts to a food, they may own a Food Hypersensitivity (FHS). FHS reactions involving the immune system are known as food allergy (FA), every other reactions are classified as food intolerances (FI). Read more…

Drug Allergy

Prescription drugs own been through a rigorous process of testing to ensure safety, despite this, a minority of individuals will develop side-effects.

Side- effects are termed “adverse drug reactions” by doctors and although the majority of adverse drug reactions are relatively minor and may even permit continuation with the drug, in some cases more severe symptoms can occur.Read more…

Atopic Eczema (Dermatitis)

Eczema is a pattern of itchy skin rash consisting of tiny pink bumps that may join together producing ill-defined pink or red patches. There are numerous types of eczema – some own known causes. Dermatitis is the term used for eczema reactions that are caused by external agents/factors.

What is the general treatment for allergies

Atopic eczema is often referred to as “infantile” of childhood eczema because that is when it generally develops. Atopic eczema is generally associated with allergies (hayfever or asthma) in either the affected individuals or in their shut relatives. Read more…

Asthma

What is asthma?
Asthma is a condition that causes swelling and inflammation inside the airways of the lungs. This inflammation and swelling is there to a greater or lesser degree every the time in people with asthma.The more inflammation there is the harder it becomes to breathe. People with asthma also own over-sensitive airways, so their airways react to triggers that do not affect other people.

When sufferers come into contact with something that irritates their airways (a trigger), it can cause their airways to narrow. Read more…

Skin Allergy

The allergic process can affect the skin producing 2 main types of rashes namely urticaria (hives, nettlerash, welts) or eczema (see atopic dermatitis section).

Urticaria is a red itchy bumpy rash that is often short-lived and can appear in various shapes and sizes anywhere on the body.It is extremely common affecting 1 in 5 of the population at sometime in their lives.In some people urticaria is accompanied by large dramatic swellings commonly affecting lips, eyelids, tongue and hand called angioedema.

Read more…

Symptoms of an allergic reaction usually develop within a few minutes of being exposed to something you’re allergic to, although occasionally they can develop gradually over a few hours.

Although allergic reactions can be a nuisance and hamper your normal activities, most are mild.

Very occasionally, a severe reaction called anaphylaxis can occur.


Pollen count

How do scientists know how much pollen is in the air? They set a trap. The trap — generally a glass plate or rod coated with adhesive — is analyzed every few hours, and the number of particles collected is then averaged to reflect the particles that would pass through the area in any 24-hour period.

That measurement is converted to pollen per cubic meter. Mold counts work much the same way.

A pollen count is an imprecise measurement, scientists confess, and an arduous one — at the analysis stage, pollen grains are counted one by one under a microscope. It is also highly time-consuming to discern between types of pollen, so they are generally bundled into one variable.

What is the general treatment for allergies

Given the imprecise nature of the measurement, entire daily pollen counts are often reported simply as low, moderate or high.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology provides up-to-date pollen counts for U.S. states.


Common allergens

The most common allergen is pollen, a powder released by trees, grasses and weeds that fertilize the seeds of neighboring plants. As plants rely on the wind to do the work for them, the pollination season sees billions of microscopic particles fill the air, and some of them finish up in people’s noses and mouths.

Spring bloomers include ash, birch, cedar, elm and maple trees, plus numerous species of grass.

Weeds pollinate in the tardy summer and drop, with ragweed being the most volatile.

The pollen that sits on brightly colored flowers is rarely responsible for hay fever because it is heavier and falls to the ground rather than becoming airborne. Bees and other insects carry flower pollen from one flower to the next without ever bothering human noses.

Mold allergies are diverse. Mold is a spore that grows on rotting logs, dead leaves and grasses. While dry-weather mold species exist, numerous types of mold thrive in moist, rainy conditions, and release their spores overnight.

What is the general treatment for allergies

During both the spring and drop allergy seasons, pollen is released mainly in the morning hours and travels best on dry, warm and breezy days.


Symptoms

The symptoms of allergic rhinitis may at first feel love those of a freezing. But unlike a freezing that may incubate before causing discomfort, symptoms of allergies generally appear almost as soon as a person encounters an allergen, such as pollen or mold.

Symptoms include itchy eyes, ears, nose or throat, sneezing, irritability, nasal congestion and hoarseness.

People may also experience cough, postnasal drip, sinus pressure or headaches, decreased sense of smell, snoring, sleep apnea, fatigue and asthma, Josephson said. [Oral Allergy Syndrome: 6 Ways to Avoid an Itchy, Tingling Mouth]

Many of these symptoms are the immune system’s overreaction as it attempts to protect the vital and sensitive respiratory system from exterior invaders. The antibodies produced by the body hold the foreign invaders out, but also cause the symptoms characteristic of allergic responses.

People can develop hay fever at any age, but most people are diagnosed with the disorder in childhood or early adulthood, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Symptoms typically become less severe as people age.

Often, children may first experience food allergies and eczema, or itchy skin, before developing hay fever, Josephson said. «This then worsens over the years, and patients then develop allergies to indoor allergens love dust and animals, or seasonal rhinitis, love ragweed, grass pollen, molds and tree pollen.»

Hay fever can also lead to other medical conditions. People who are allergic to weeds are more likely to get other allergies and develop asthma as they age, Josephson said.

But those who get immunotherapy, such as allergy shots that assist people’s bodies get used to allergens, are less likely to develop asthma, he said.


Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

Last Saturday, a day after the opening of “Peter Rabbit,” Will Gluck’s new and free adaptation of Beatrix Potter’s stories, Kenneth Mendez, the president and C.E.O. of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, issued both a statement on and an open letter criticizing the film’s makers and its studio, Sony, for one specific scene. In that scene, Peter and the four other rabbits, who are being threatened and pursued by Tom McGregor (the heir to the venerable Mr.

McGregor’s garden), adopt a new strategy to fight him: knowing that he’s allergic to blackberries, they use a slingshot to shoot blackberries at him, and one goes directly into his open mouth. He begins to choke, feels an anaphylactic episode coming on, reaches into his pocket for his EpiPen, injects himself with it, and keels over in exhaustion.

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation criticized the filmmakers for making light of a life-threatening allergy and for depicting the use of an allergen as a weapon against a gravely allergic person.

The statement warned that the movie could be “disturbing” to children with serious allergies; some people advocated a boycott. In response, Sony offered an apology. As a parent of children with severe food allergies, I wish I’d seen the movie before the controversy broke out, because I’d be curious to see whether I would own reacted strongly to the scene without having been alerted to it beforehand. Under the given circumstances, I found that I consent that the scene spotlights an unpleasant insensitivity, even an ugly obliviousness, on the part of the filmmakers.

What is the general treatment for allergies

Yet, even more, it throws into sharp relief the over-all tone and import of the film, and, in the process, reveals other peculiarities that make “Peter Rabbit” exemplary of recent movies and of the times.

“Peter Rabbit” is a boisterous comedy in which live action (human characters in realistic homes, landscapes, and towns) is blended with C.G.I. as seamlessly and as persuasively as in “Paddington 2.” The film was made by a comedy director (Gluck directed “Easy A” and “Friends with Benefits”) who, in the script, which he co-wrote with Rob Lieber, has taken extreme liberties with Potter’s stories.

Peter and his family live in a hollow beneath a tree in rural Windermere, England, and gleefully filch produce from the garden of their nemesis, the elderly Mr.

What is the general treatment for allergies

McGregor. When Mr. McGregor suddenly dies, the home and garden are inherited by his great-nephew Tom (Domhnall Gleeson), a Londoner and a tidy freak who is even more hostile to the rabbits than Mr. McGregor was. But his battles against them are inhibited when he makes the acquaintance of his neighbor Bea (Rose Byrne), an artist who is the rabbits’ defender and protector (and also their portraitist). Bea and Tom drop in love; knowing that Bea also loves the rabbits—and, especially, their ringleader and brightest personality, Peter—Tom has to do his rabbit hunting on the sly.

Peter and the other rabbits take advantage of Tom’s self-enforced restraint to run rampage through his garden and make his life miserable; Tom, for his part, stealthily takes increasingly forceful action against them.

That’s when, facing genuine harm, the rabbits prepare to unleash the blackberry attack, knowing full well its potential consequences. Peter calls it “the endgame.” For that matter, a bit earlier, as they plan the attack, the other rabbits are hesitant; Peter’s mild-mannered cousin Benjamin says that “allergies are serious” and adds, “I don’t desire to get any letters.” (The line wasn’t inserted into the movie after the controversy arose; it was always there.)

What’s peculiar about “Peter Rabbit” is that, along with its quippy, often self-referential humor and plentiful (often clever) visual gags, it features an unusual quantity and degree of violence, which link it to classic-era Looney Tunes cartoons and Three Stooges shorts.

When the elderly Mr. McGregor keels over, Peter examines him by poking his eyeball—and, after declaring him dead, gleefully takes credit for killing him. (Mr. McGregor actually died of a heart attack.) Tom comes slamming at the rabbits with rakes, hoes, and other garden tools. He installs an electric fence against the animal intruders, only to own the rabbits rewire it, electrifying his doorknobs with shocks that blast him, cannonball-like, against hard rock walls. The rabbits plant snapping traps and rakes around Tom’s bed, leading to pinchings and clobberings; they leave various fruits on staircase landings, sending Tom tumbling below.

There’s a repeated gag in which one of the sisters enjoys taking a hard drop and breaking one rib after another, and a climactic bit, involving dynamite, that’s almost apocalyptic.

In another sense, though, the tale owes nothing to the action-heavy, character-thin antics of Bugs Rabbit or Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd or Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote.

What is the general treatment for allergies

Rather, Gluck’s “Peter Rabbit” is thoroughly composed and intricately characterized; the rabbits, no less than the humans, are given elaborate backstories and large emotional arcs that the plot is devoted, at length, to illustrating, explicating, and resolving. Peter and his sisters—Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cottontail—are orphans; their dad was killed and eaten by Mr. McGregor, and Peter’s familiar blue jacket is actually his father’s.

Their mom died, too, making Bea is the closest thing to a parent that the rabbits have.

Meanwhile, Peter is a mischievous, temperamental, vain, proud hothead, who, in a silent moment, acknowledges that it’s his “character flaw” to do “stupid and reckless” things. (Oddly enough—or perhaps not oddly at every, given that the movie is written by two men—Bea is given the least backstory.) When romance blooms between Bea and Tom, Peter’s response is partly one of a practical worry for the rabbits’ safety. But, as the violence ramps up between Tom and Peter, even Benjamin wonders whether Peter has an ulterior motive—jealousy. In other words, with Bea as Peter’s virtual mom, “Peter Rabbit” is something of a tale about Peter trying to come to terms with a stepfather; the comedic drama links Peter’s mean streak to his emotional deprivation and trauma, and it takes him carefully through the paces of his rise to self-recognition and maturity.

It is precisely this strain of emotional realism that makes the allergy subplot, slight though it is, so repellent.

The movie’s other varieties of violence are exaggerated, cartoonish, not just in depiction but in substance. Few kids own experience with electrical engineering or own dynamite at home; most kids know other kids with severe allergies. (Despite its explosive extremes and intricate, Rube Goldberg-esque calculation, there are no guns and no knives; Gluck clearly knows that certain things aren’t to be trifled with.) Meanwhile, the same emotional realism turns “Peter Rabbit” didactic, dutiful, tedious. Its mechanistic moralism, seemingly distilled from screenwriting classes and studio notes, is the sort that marks so numerous movies now—ones for adults as well as those for children—imparting values in the form of equation-like talking points, which prepare viewers not for life but for more, and similarly narrow, viewing.

Gluck clearly relishes the slapstick action that the characters incite, the situations inspire, and the technology enables, and he invests it with his own sense of exuberant discovery, which is minor but authentic.

When it comes to life lessons, however, he dons his official cap and, far from doing any learning in the course of the action, merely dispenses the official line. That’s why the scene involving a life-threatening allergy is every the more conspicuous: while the relax of the movie marches in lockstep with its edifying narrative, that scene is out of put. It doesn’t follow the script.

At Carolina Asthma & Allergy Middle, we’re committed to providing the highest quality asthma and allergy care in North and South Carolina. To better serve both states, our Rock Hill location is located near the South Carolina border, making it easily accessible to South Carolina residents in Rock Hill, Fort Mill, and Lake Wylie as well as North Carolina areas such as Pineville.

We own five medical experts on hand at our Rock Hill office, including Natasha Laungani, FNP-C; S.

Nicole Chadha, MD; Roopen R. Patel, MD; Susan I. Hungness, MD; and Glenn W. Errington, MD. Dr. Laungani, who is exclusive to our Rock Hill location, studied at the University of Kentucky and the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Errington specializes in children over two years ancient and adults. He received certifications through the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.

You’ll discover our shot room at our Rock Hill office as well, which is open until 4:30 p.m. on weekdays. This is for our allergy patients dealing with skin allergies, food allergies, insect allergies, and more.

What is the general treatment for allergies

Our patients who need allergy treatment or asthma treatment can set up an appointment for any day of the week until 5 p.m. with one of our specialists. The phone number for our Carolina Asthma & Allergy Middle, including our Rock Hill office, is 704-372-7900.

Schedule an Appointment

To schedule or update an appointment and general questions, please call…

Or Contact Us

Please note: Due to healthcare privacy laws, we cannot answer any questions pertaining to personal health information by e-mail.

Itchy eyes, a congested nose, sneezing, wheezing and hives: these are symptoms of an allergic reaction caused when plants release pollen into the air, generally in the spring or drop.

Numerous people use hay fever as a colloquial term for these seasonal allergies and the inflammation of the nose and airways.

But hay fever is a misnomer, said Dr. Jordan Josephson, an ear, nose and throat doctor and sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

«It is not an allergy to hay,» Josephson, author of the book «Sinus Relief Now» (Perigee Trade, 2006), told Live Science. «Rather, it is an allergy to weeds that pollinate.»

Doctors and researchers prefer the phrase allergic rhinitis to describe the condition.

More than 50 million people experience some type of allergy each year, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. In 2017, 8.1% of adults and 7.7% of children reported own allergic rhinitis symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Worldwide, between 10 and 30% of people are affected by allergic rhinitis, Josephson said.

In 2019, spring arrived early in some parts of the country and later in others, according to the National Phenology Network (NPN). Spring brings blooming plants and, for some, lots of sneezing, itchy, watery eyes and runny noses. According to NPN data, spring reared its head about two weeks early in areas of California, Nevada and numerous of the Southern and Southeastern states.

Much of California, for example, is preparing for a brutal allergy season due to the large quantity of winter rain. On the other hand, spring ranged from about one to two weeks tardy in the Northwest, the Midwest and the Mid-Atlantic U.S. [Watch a Massive ‘Pollen Cloud’ Explode from Late-Blooming Tree]


Main allergy symptoms

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  2. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  3. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  4. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  5. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  6. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something. They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.


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What is the general treatment for allergies