What is the difference between an allergy and asthma

Some tree pollen causes more problems than others. Some of the trees that cause the most symptoms are:

  1. Elm
  2. Olive
  3. Beech
  4. Cottonwood
  5. Alder
  6. Mountain elder
  7. Hickory
  8. Aspen
  9. Oak
  10. Birch
  11. Pecan
  12. Poplar
  13. Mulberry
  14. Cedar
  15. Ash
  16. Box elder
  17. Willow

Being allergic to some trees could cause you to react to certain foods. It happens because the tree pollen is similar to the protein in some fruits, vegetables and nuts.1Your immune system gets confused and can’t tell the difference between the two.

Eating these foods may cause your mouth or face to itch or swell. These foods may include apples, cherries, pears and more. This is called oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Birch and alder trees cause the most OAS food reactions.

In some cases, your tree pollen allergy may cross-react with some nuts, love peanuts or almonds. If you own mouth itching or swelling while eating nuts, you could own a more serious, life-threatening reaction calledanaphylaxis, which is common with nut allergies. If this happens to you, call your doctor correct away.


What Can I Do to Relieve My Pollen Allergy Symptoms?

Thankfully, there are several options for relieving pollen allergy symptoms, available both over-the-counter and by prescription.

Talk to your doctor or a board-certified allergist about your symptoms and treatment options. Your doctor might own you take a combination of medicines to hold your symptoms controlled. These medicines include:

  1. Nasal corticosteroids
  2. Leukotriene (loo-kuh-trahy-een) receptors
  3. Antihistamines
  4. Decongestants
  5. Cromolyn sodium nose spray

If these medicines don’t completely relieve your symptoms, your doctor might also give you immunotherapy. This is a long-term treatment that can reduce the severity of your allergic reactions. It generally involves regular shots, tablets or drops you take under the tongue.

You can also take steps to reduce your exposure to tree pollen:

  1. Watch pollen counts on a website love theNational Allergy Bureau™.
  2. Avoid pets that spend a lot of time outdoors.
  3. Start taking allergy medicinebefore pollen season begins.
  4. Keep your windows closed and use a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter on your central air conditioner.
  5. If you haven’t had allergy testing, discover a board-certified allergist to test you for pollen allergies.

    Work with your doctor to come up with a treatment plan.

  6. Dry your clothes in a dryer and not exterior on a clothes line.
  7. Learn about the trees in your area and when they produce the most pollen. For example, oak tree pollen is highest in the morning. If you are allergic to oak pollen, save your outdoor activities for later in the day.
  8. Change and wash clothes you wear during outdoor activities.

It may be hard to avoid tree pollen during the tardy winter and spring. But you can reduce your symptoms with the correct treatment.

Medical ReviewFebruary 2018.

References
1. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) | AAAAI.

(n.d.). Retrieved February 26, 2018, from https://www.aaaai.org/conditio…ergies-can-be-relate

It is significant to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies. By joining our community and following our blog, you will get news about research and treatments. Our community also provides an chance to join with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

What Can I Do to Relieve My Pollen Allergy Symptoms?

Thankfully, there are several options for relieving pollen allergy symptoms, available both over-the-counter and by prescription. Talk to your doctor or a board-certified allergist about your symptoms and treatment options.

Your doctor might own you take a combination of medicines to hold your symptoms controlled. These medicines include:

  1. Nasal corticosteroids
  2. Leukotriene (loo-kuh-trahy-een) receptors
  3. Antihistamines
  4. Decongestants
  5. Cromolyn sodium nose spray

If these medicines don’t completely relieve your symptoms, your doctor might also give you immunotherapy. This is a long-term treatment that can reduce the severity of your allergic reactions. It generally involves regular shots, tablets or drops you take under the tongue.

You can also take steps to reduce your exposure to tree pollen:

  1. Watch pollen counts on a website love theNational Allergy Bureau™.
  2. Avoid pets that spend a lot of time outdoors.
  3. Start taking allergy medicinebefore pollen season begins.
  4. Keep your windows closed and use a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter on your central air conditioner.
  5. If you haven’t had allergy testing, discover a board-certified allergist to test you for pollen allergies.

    Work with your doctor to come up with a treatment plan.

  6. Dry your clothes in a dryer and not exterior on a clothes line.
  7. Learn about the trees in your area and when they produce the most pollen. For example, oak tree pollen is highest in the morning. If you are allergic to oak pollen, save your outdoor activities for later in the day.
  8. Change and wash clothes you wear during outdoor activities.

It may be hard to avoid tree pollen during the tardy winter and spring.

But you can reduce your symptoms with the correct treatment.

Medical ReviewFebruary 2018.

References
1. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) | AAAAI. (n.d.). Retrieved February 26, 2018, from https://www.aaaai.org/conditio…ergies-can-be-relate

It is significant to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies. By joining our community and following our blog, you will get news about research and treatments. Our community also provides an chance to join with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

JOIN NOW



Your caring, compassionate, experienced allergy, asthma and immunology team.

Julie Applebaum, MSN, RN, FNP-C

“I enjoy working here because while we are making an improvement in our patients’ health, we develop interpersonal relationships with our patients and their families on a professional level. As a longtime allergy sufferer myself, I see the importance of treatment. Following patients from an initial visit through testing and then a step further by actually treating the underlying cause of their numerous years of suffering, it is rewarding to see the relief they experience when they are properly cared for.»

Board-Certified:Family Practice, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP)

Graduate School:Chamberlain College of Nursing

Member:American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology

Favorite Quote:«Don’t ever let anybody tell you you’re not excellent enough.»

Eric S.

Applebaum, MD, FACAAI

“I had a longstanding interest in how the immune system works. Allergy and immunology was a way to pursue my interest in caring for patients. I also enjoyed the thought of specializing; becoming an expert in one area rather than trying to remain capable in every areas as a generalist.

What is the difference between an allergy and asthma

I was interested in seeing patients of every ages, especially multiple family members. I wanted to make a difference in patients’ lives and assist with illnesses often ignored by other physicians.

“I most enjoy seeing how much better patients feel and how quickly they realize that they own been suffering unnecessarily for such extremely endless periods of time. I treat patients love intelligent people capable of understanding their conditions and the treatment options available.

I treat patients the way I desire to be treated when I own to see a doctor. I desire my patients to know that there are no hopeless cases. I am their advocate in every way they need me for their allergic problems. I take it as a personal challenge to assist them live better.”

When not working, Dr. Applebaum enjoys spending time with his wife and daughters, traveling, watching pro basketball, reading and cooking.

Board-Certified:American Board of Allergy & Immunology, American Board of Internal Medicine

Fellow:American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

Fellowship-Trained:Allergy & Immunology, Schneider Children’s Hospital & Endless Island Jewish Medical Middle, New Hyde Park, NY

Residency:Internal Medicine, Endless Island Jewish Medical Center

MD:Special Distinction for Research in Psychoneuroimmunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY

Member:American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, New Jersey Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Society, Medical Society of New Jersey, Morris County Medical Society

Awards:Castle Connolly Guide to Top Doctors in the New York Metro Area, 2000 to present

Priscilla Leon, Office Manager

Favorite Quote:«I enjoy working in the allergy field as I can see the transition in patients from when they start treatment (a not so happy patient), to a patient that constantly praises how much better they are feeling ever since treatment began with Dr.

Applebaum.»

«In my spare time I am an avid runner, beach-goer and I enjoy photography»

Make us your trusted partners in effective allergy and asthma treatment. Believe Eric S. Applebaum, MD, for comprehensive allergy, asthma, sinusitis and immunology care. Call us at 973.335.1700 in Parsippany or use our online Request an Appointment form to schedule your consultation. We welcome patients from Mountain Lakes and Parsippany Troy Hills, including Montville, Parsippany, Denville (Morris County, NJ), Passaic (Passaic County, NJ).

Susan S.

Laubach, MD joined Allergy & Asthma Medical Group and Research Middle in July 2011. Originally from Stockton, California, Dr. Laubach majored in Human Biology with honors from Stanford University before undergoing her medical training at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine. She trained in pediatrics at Mount Sinai Medical Middle in New York, NY where she founded a Palliative Care service for children with life-threatening illnesses. She then completed a fellowship in Allergy and Immunology at Duke University in Durham, NC where she received extensive training in the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency and food allergy.

From there, she was honored to serve athletic duty, dependent, and retired military service members in the Department of Allergy/Immunology at Walter Reed Army Medical Middle in Washington, DC.

Prior to joining Allergy & Asthma Medical Group and Research Middle, Dr. Laubach conducted research on sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for children with peanut allergy, under the direction of Dr.

What is the difference between an allergy and asthma

Wesley Burks at Duke University. She has also published research on influenza vaccination in patients with egg allergy, and presented data on diverse build-up schedules for immunotherapy (allergy shots). Dr. Laubach is an athletic member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; the American Academy of Pediatrics; and the American Medical Association.

Dr. Laubach met her husband, Justin, while both volunteering at Camp Okizu, a camp for northern Californian children with cancer and their siblings.

He now practices anesthesiology in San Diego. They own 2 young children and a large extended family in the San Diego area.

Click on the link under to view Dr. Laubach’s CVs

Laubach — Full CV
Laubach — Abbreviated CV

AWARDS:

  1. Nominated for the UCSF Chancellor’s Award for the Advancement of Women, 2000
  2. ACAAI Acorn Award, 2007

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We specialize in the diagnosis and management

of asthma, allergy and clinical immunology including conditions such as Allergic Rhinitis, Sinusitis.

We also treat Atopic Dermatitis (eczema), food allergy, drug allergy, Anaphylaxis, contact dermatitis, Urticaria (hives), Angioedema (swelling), Conjunctivitis, primary immunodeficiency syndromes, and allergic reaction to insect bites and numerous others.

We assist patients determine the causes and treatment for symptoms such as nasal congestion, “sinus” symptoms, ear and eye symptoms, shortness of breath, wheezing, headache, chronic cough, recurrent respiratory and other infections, skin rashes, hives and others.

We offer every types of allergy testing, Rhinoscopy, Pulmonary Function testing as well as Allergen Immunotherapy.

Allergy treatments come in diverse forms and work
in a variety of ways. The treatment for your allergy will depend on its causes and the type, frequency and severity of your symptoms.

Your allergy treatment plan may include medications, immunotherapy, environmental changes or dietary changes. Enquire your doctor to explain anything about your diagnosis or treatment that you don't understand.

With test results that identify your allergens and a treatment plan to assist you take control, you'll be capable reduce or eliminate allergy signs and symptoms.

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Dr.

What is the difference between an allergy and asthma

Marc McMorris grew up on a farm in northcentral Pennsylvania. He received his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia in 1985.

What is the difference between an allergy and asthma

He came to the University of Michigan for his pediatric residency and served a Chief Resident from 1988-1989. Following 3 years as a pediatric ER attending he returned to the University of Michigan and completed his Allergy and Immunology fellowship in 1994. Families love Dr.

What is the difference between an allergy and asthma

McMorris ability to hear with sensitivity, and they appreciate his tender approach to children. For 3 years, Dr. McMorris served as Medical Advisor for Food Anaphylaxis Education, Inc., a nonprofit Michigan education organization before becoming Director of the University of Michigan Food Allergy Service. The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network of Virginia awarded him the Muriel C. Furlong Award for making a difference. He has been recognized as one of the University of Michigan Health Systems Top 100 Physicians, received the University of Michigan Department of Pediatrics Top 10% Faculty Teaching Award and was inducted into the University of Michigan Department of Medicine Clinical Excellence Society in 2013.

What is the difference between an allergy and asthma

He volunteers for food allergy educational activities for Michigan families, schools, places of worship, professional organizations and health care providers. He has participated in research evaluating anaphylaxis care, school readiness for students with food allergies, self-reported reactions to peanut and tree nuts, and the impact of food allergies on quality of life for families with food allergies. He is considered an expert in every aspects of food allergies. He currently serves as Medical Director for the Dominos Farms Allergy Specialty Clinic/Food Allergy Clinic and Clinical Service Chief for the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

When spring allergy season first starts, causing you to sniffle and sneeze, tree pollen is to blame.

What is the difference between an allergy and asthma

Trees start producing pollen as early as January in the Southern U.S. Numerous trees hold producing pollen through June.


What Are the Symptoms of a Tree Pollen Allergy?

Pollen allergysymptoms are commonly called “hay fever.” Pollen released by trees, as well as grasses and weeds, cause these symptoms. They include:

  1. Itchy nose, eyes, ears and mouth
  2. Red and watery eyes
  3. Runny nose and mucus production
  4. Stuffy nose (nasal congestion)
  5. Sneezing
  6. Swelling around the eyes

If you haveallergic asthmaand are allergic to tree pollen, you might also own asthma symptoms while the trees are pollinating.

Tree pollen is finer than other pollens.

Because of this, the wind can carry it for miles. These light, dry grains easily discover their way to your sinuses, lungs and eyes, making them hard to avoid.


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