What is the best medication for severe allergies

What is the best medication for severe allergies

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders. Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

8.00 Skin Disorders

A. What skin disorders do we assess with these listings?

We use these listings to assess skin disorders that may result from hereditary, congenital, or acquired pathological processes. The kinds of impairments covered by these listings are: Ichthyosis, bullous diseases, chronic infections of the skin or mucous membranes, dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, genetic photosensitivity disorders, and burns.

B. What documentation do we need?

When we assess the existence and severity of your skin disorder, we generally need information about the onset, duration, frequency of flare-ups, and prognosis of your skin disorder; the location, size, and appearance of lesions; and, when applicable, history of exposure to toxins, allergens, or irritants, familial incidence, seasonal variation, stress factors, and your ability to function exterior of a highly protective environment.

To confirm the diagnosis, we may need laboratory findings (for example, results of a biopsy obtained independently of Social Security disability evaluation or blood tests) or evidence from other medically acceptable methods consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice.

C. How do we assess the severity of your skin disorder(s)?

We generally base our assessment of severity on the extent of your skin lesions, the frequency of flare-ups of your skin lesions, how your symptoms (including pain) limit you, the extent of your treatment, and how your treatment affects you.

What is the best medication for severe allergies

1. Extensive skin lesions.

Extensive skin lesions are those that involve multiple body sites or critical body areas, and result in a extremely serious limitation. Examples of extensive skin lesions that result in a extremely serious limitation include but are not limited to:

a. Skin lesions that interfere with the motion of your joints and that extremely seriously limit your use of more than one extremity; that is, two upper extremities, two lower extremities, or one upper and one lower extremity.

b.

Skin lesions on the palms of both hands that extremely seriously limit your ability to do fine and gross motor movements.

c. Skin lesions on the soles of both feet, the perineum, or both inguinal areas that extremely seriously limit your ability to ambulate.

2. Frequency of flare-ups.

If you own skin lesions, but they do not meet the requirements of any of the listings in this body system, you may still own an impairment that prevents you from doing any gainful activity when we consider your condition over time, especially if your flare-ups result in extensive skin lesions, as defined in C1 of this section.

Therefore, if you own frequent flare-ups, we may discover that your impairment(s) is medically equal to one of these listings even though you own some periods during which your condition is in remission. We will consider how frequent and serious your flare-ups are, how quickly they resolve, and how you function between flare-ups to determine whether you own been unable to do any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months or can be expected to be unable to do any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months.

We will also consider the frequency of your flare-ups when we determine whether you own a severe impairment and when we need to assess your residual functional capacity.

3. Symptoms (including pain).

Symptoms (including pain) may be significant factors contributing to the severity of your skin disorder(s). We assess the impact of symptoms as explained in §§ 404.1521, 404.1529, 416.921, and 416.929 of this chapter.

4. Treatment.

We assess the effects of medication, therapy, surgery, and any other form of treatment you get when we determine the severity and duration of your impairment(s).

Skin disorders frequently reply to treatment; however, response to treatment can vary widely, with some impairments becoming resistant to treatment. Some treatments can own side effects that can in themselves result in limitations.

a. We assess the effects of continuing treatment as prescribed by determining if there is improvement in the symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings of your disorder, and if you experience side effects that result in functional limitations.

To assess the effects of your treatment, we may need information about:

i. The treatment you own been prescribed (for example, the type, dosage, method, and frequency of istration of medication or therapy);

ii. Your response to the treatment;

iii. Any adverse effects of the treatment; and

iv. The expected duration of the treatment.

b. Because treatment itself or the effects of treatment may be temporary, in most cases sufficient time must elapse to permit us to assess the impact and expected duration of treatment and its side effects.

Except under 8.07 and 8.08, you must follow continuing treatment as prescribed for at least 3 months before your impairment can be sure to meet the requirements of a skin disorder listing. (See 8.00H if you are not undergoing treatment or did not own treatment for 3 months.) We consider your specific response to treatment when we assess the overall severity of your impairment.

What is the best medication for severe allergies

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D. How do we assess impairments that may affect the skin and other body systems?

When your impairment affects your skin and has effects in other body systems, we first assess the predominant feature of your impairment under the appropriate body system. Examples include, but are not limited to the following.

1. Tuberous sclerosis primarily affects the brain. The predominant features are seizures, which we assess under the neurological listings in 11.00, and developmental delays or other mental disorders, which we assess under the mental disorders listings in 12.00.

2. Malignant tumors of the skin (for example, malignant melanomas) are cancers, or neoplastic diseases, which we assess under the listings in 13.00.

3. Autoimmune disorders and other immune system disorders (for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and Sjögren’s syndrome) often involve more than one body system. We first assess these disorders under the immune system disorders listings in 14.00. We assess SLE under 14.02, scleroderma under 14.04, Sjögren’s syndrome under 14.10, and HIV infection under 14.11.

4. Disfigurement or deformity resulting from skin lesions may result in loss of sight, hearing, lecture, and the ability to chew (mastication). We assess these impairments and their effects under the special senses and lecture listings in 2.00 and the digestive system listings in 5.00. Facial disfigurement or other physical deformities may also own effects we assess under the mental disorders listings in 12.00, such as when they affect mood or social functioning.

E. How do we assess genetic photosensitivity disorders?

1. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). When you own XP, your impairment meets the requirements of 8.07A if you own clinical and laboratory findings showing that you own the disorder. (See 8.00E3.) People who own XP own a lifelong hypersensitivity to every forms of ultraviolet light and generally lead extremely restricted lives in highly protective environments in order to prevent skin cancers from developing.

Some people with XP also experience problems with their eyes, neurological problems, mental disorders, and problems in other body systems.

2. Other genetic photosensitivity disorders.

Other genetic photosensitivity disorders may vary in their effects on diverse people, and may not result in an inability to engage in any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months. Therefore, if you own a genetic photosensitivity disorder other than XP (established by clinical and laboratory findings as described in 8.00E3), you must show that you own either extensive skin lesions or an inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment to meet the requirements of 8.07B.

You must also show that your impairment meets the duration requirement. By inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment we mean that you must avoid exposure to ultraviolet light (including sunlight passing through windows and light from unshielded fluorescent bulbs), wear protective clothing and eyeglasses, and use opaque wide spectrum sunscreens in order to avoid skin cancer or other serious effects.

Some genetic photosensitivity disorders can own extremely serious effects in other body systems, especially special senses and lecture (2.00), neurological (11.00), mental (12.00), and neoplastic (13.00). We will assess the predominant feature of your impairment under the appropriate body system, as explained in 8.00D.

3. Clinical and laboratory findings.

a. General. We need documentation from an acceptable medical source to establish that you own a medically determinable impairment. In general, we must own evidence of appropriate laboratory testing showing that you own XP or another genetic photosensitivity disorder.

We will discover that you own XP or another genetic photosensitivity disorder based on a report from an acceptable medical source indicating that you own the impairment, supported by definitive genetic laboratory studies documenting appropriate chromosomal changes, including abnormal DNA repair or another DNA or genetic abnormality specific to your type of photosensitivity disorder.

b. What we will accept as medical evidence instead of the actual laboratory report.

When we do not own the actual laboratory report, we need evidence from an acceptable medical source that includes appropriate clinical findings for your impairment and that is persuasive that a positive diagnosis has been confirmed by appropriate laboratory testing at some time prior to our evaluation.

What is the best medication for severe allergies

To be persuasive, the report must state that the appropriate definitive genetic laboratory study was conducted and that the results confirmed the diagnosis. The report must be consistent with other evidence in your case record.

F. How do we assess burns?

Electrical, chemical, or thermal burns frequently affect other body systems; for example, musculoskeletal, special senses and lecture, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, neurological, or mental.

Consequently, we assess burns the way we assess other disorders that can affect the skin and other body systems, using the listing for the predominant feature of your impairment. For example, if your soft tissue injuries are under continuing surgical management (as defined in 1.00M), we will assess your impairment under 1.08. However, if your burns do not meet the requirements of 1.08 and you own extensive skin lesions that result in a extremely serious limitation (as defined in 8.00C1) that has lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months, we will assess them under 8.08.

What is the best medication for severe allergies

G. How do we determine if your skin disorder(s) will continue at a disabling level of severity in order to meet the duration requirement?

For every of these skin disorder listings except 8.07 and 8.08, we will discover that your impairment meets the duration requirement if your skin disorder results in extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed. By persist, we mean that the longitudinal clinical record shows that, with few exceptions, your lesions own been at the level of severity specified in the listing.

For 8.07A, we will presume that you meet the duration requirement. For 8.07B and 8.08, we will consider every of the relevant medical and other information in your case record to determine whether your skin disorder meets the duration requirement.

H. How do we assess your skin disorder(s) if your impairment does not meet the requirements of one of these listings?

1. These listings are only examples of common skin disorders that we consider severe enough to prevent you from engaging in any gainful activity. For most of these listings, if you do not own continuing treatment as prescribed, if your treatment has not lasted for at least 3 months, or if you do not own extensive skin lesions that own persisted for at least 3 months, your impairment cannot meet the requirements of these skin disorder listings.

(This provision does not apply to 8.07 and 8.08.) However, we may still discover that you are disabled because your impairment(s) meets the requirements of a listing in another body system or medically equals the severity of a listing. (See §§ 404.1526 and 416.926 of this chapter.) We may also discover you disabled at the final step of the sequential evaluation process.

2. If you own not received ongoing treatment or do not own an ongoing relationship with the medical community despite the existence of a severe impairment(s), or if your skin lesions own not persisted for at least 3 months but you are undergoing continuing treatment as prescribed, you may still own an impairment(s) that meets a listing in another body system or that medically equals a listing.

If you do not own an impairment(s) that meets or medically equals a listing, we will assess your residual functional capacity and proceed to the fourth and, if necessary, the fifth step of the sequential evaluation process in §§ 404.1520 and 416.920 of this chapter. When we decide whether you continue to be disabled, we use the rules in §§ 404.1594 and 416.994 of this chapter.

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8.01 Category of Impairments, Skin Disorders

8.02 Ichthyosis, with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

8.03 Bullous disease (for example, pemphigus, erythema multiforme bullosum, epidermolysis bullosa, bullous pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis), with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

.

8.04 Chronic infections of the skin or mucous membranes, with extensive fungating or extensive ulcerating skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

8.05 Dermatitis (for example, psoriasis, dyshidrosis, atopic dermatitis, exfoliative dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis), with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

8.06 Hidradenitis suppurativa, with extensive skin lesions involving both axillae, both inguinal areas or the perineum that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

8.07 Genetic photosensitivity disorders, established as described in 8.00E.

A.

What is the best medication for severe allergies

Xeroderma pigmentosum. Consider the individual disabled from birth.

What is the best medication for severe allergies

B. Other genetic photosensitivity disorders, with:

1. Extensive skin lesions that own lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months,

OR

2. Inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment for a continuous period of at least 12 months (see 8.00E2).

8.08Burns, with extensive skin lesions that own lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months (see 8.00F).

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The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis.

A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness. Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology.

The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis. It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat.

It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library. As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


Caring for one patient at a time

If you are love most people, you hate the thought of walking into a crowded waiting room at the doctor’s office – and facing a endless wait before the doctor or nurse practitioner can see you.

After every, your time is just as valuable as theirs. Maybe that’s why thousands of patients own chosen Allergic & Asthmatic Comprehensive Care of New Jersey (AACCNJ).

At AACCNJ, our medical director, Eric S. Applebaum, MD, schedules and sees one patient at a time. That’s how he has done it for over 20 years. Dr. Applebaum strives to be on time for your scheduled appointment as he also understands the worth of your time.

It’s not unusual for Dr.

Applebaum to spend a full hour with each patient, answering their questions, explaining treatment options and simply getting to know them as individuals. He believes that’s the best way to accurately diagnose their conditions and assist them overcome the limitations their allergies and asthma put upon them.

Dr. Applebaum provides comprehensive care for the full spectrum of allergy and asthma conditions and symptoms, including:
• Food allergies • Seasonal allergies • Pollen allergy • Atopic dermatitis • Eczema • Skin rash • Hives
• Allergic rhinitis (hay fever) • Chronic sinusitis • Nasal congestion • Asthma • Coughing • Wheezing

AACCNJ serves the Mountain Lakes and Parsippany Troy Hills communities of Parsippany, Denville, Montville (Morris County, NJ), Passaic (Passaic County, NJ).

Discover today’s most effective allergy and asthma treatment.

What is the best medication for severe allergies

Believe Eric S. Applebaum, MD, for comprehensive allergy, asthma and immunology care and advanced solutions. Call us at 973.335.1700 in Parsippany or use our online Request an Appointment form to schedule your consultation.

College: Washington & Lee University
Medical School: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
Internship and Residency​: Medical College Of Virginia
Fellowship: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Board Certified Pediatric Pulmonary

Dr.

Ashe became interested in medicine in college, first as a volunteer then as an orderly. He saw how appreciative patients could be to the smallest quantity of care and attention. Dr. Ashe was naturally drawn to pediatrics due to children’s honesty, directness, and ability to recover from the most serious conditions. He enjoys the uniqueness of pediatric pulmonary medicine and providing care to a variety of chronic illnesses such as premature lung diseases, Cystic Fibrosis, and asthma.

Dr.

Ashe, also, is an advocate for children with debilitating handicaps. He greatly enjoys being a doctor and is rewarded everyday from his patients’ smiles of gratitude as they work together to enhance their quality of life. Dr. Ashe specializes in pediatric respiratory and allergy diseases and has practiced in the Charlotte region for the past nineteen years. He is co-director of the Western Carolina Cystic Fibrosis Middle and Assistant Director of the Holy Angels Institute. He has served on numerous pediatric medical committees and boards and is actively involved in medical education in the community.

Dr. Ashe was awarded the Charlotte Top Docs Award in 2011, 2012, 2014 and 2015.

He enjoys a number of outdoor activities and is an avid golfer. He and his wife own 3 children.

How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically. Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone.

Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


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