What is the best medication for dog allergies

Q-I`m considering putting my 1 1/2-year-old poodle on cortisone for an itching problem. What side effects should I expect?

A-The side effects of cortisone can be divided into two categories: common

»nuisance» reactions and less common but more serious disease syndromes related to the size of the cortisone dosage and duration of use.

In the first category, mild side effects can include increased water consumption and, consequently, increased urination.

What is the best medication for dog allergies

This reaction can be so severe that the dog is unable to hold its urine for the night and may have

»accidents» in the home. The drug can also stimulate a dog`s appetite. In addition, cortisone makes some dogs sluggish. These two reactions can combine to make a dog overweight, another potential problem.

In the second, more serious category of reactions, cortisone greatly reduces an animal`s resistance to infections of every types. Viral and bacterial infections, fungal and parasitic conditions are every far more likely to happen in a dog that is on cortisone.

To cite a common example, dogs that are on the drug for endless periods of time often develop urinary tract or bladder infections.

Various other infections may attack anywhere, including in the skin.

Dogs on cortisone may also develop negative changes in the liver: Fat replaces some of the athletic cells in the liver, and over a endless period of time, this can compromise the efficiency of the liver`s functioning.

Yet another syndrome, called Cushing`s disease, can also develop in dogs given cortisone for a endless period. This can cause numerous problems: weakness, hair loss, extremely fatty livers, a tendency toward thyroid problems and diabetes.

Proceed cautiously. Sometimes cortisone is the best treatment for an itchy dog, especially if istered for only a limited period, such as to ease a seasonal allergy. For example, if a dog itches every year when pollens are in full »bloom,» some form of cortisone, given for the four to eight weeks when the allergies are at their worst, will own extremely little, if any, long-term side effects.

If your poodle`s itching problem does not reply to short-term therapy, you may face putting the dog on cortisone for the relax of its life.

Before opting for that, fully investigate the root causes of the itching.

Every year about this time I feel compelled to alert dog owners about protecting pets against heartworm. As the mosquito season approaches, so does the threat of heartworm, but taking a few simple precautions can save your dog`s life.

Each year perhaps as numerous as 35 percent of dog owners neglect to safeguard their pets against heartworm. I wish I could attribute this to forgetfulness, but in most cases the problem stems from ignorance and indifference. I only hope I can impress such owners with the fatal facts:

Heartworm can kill-Heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis) can be 14 inches long!

If left untreated, they cause death in 50 percent of cases. Large accumulations of the worms bring on congestive heart failure and impair circulation, causing serious damage to the heart, lungs, liver and kidneys.

Mosquitos carry the disease-The mosquito transmits the illness when it bites a dog already carrying heartworm larvae, ingests the dog`s blood, then bites another uninfected dog. If your dog acts listless, coughs frequently, seems to exhibit poor endurance, has difficulty breathing and is losing weight, take it to a veterinarian immediately.

Even if the dog is infected, it can generally be saved, though at some risk and grand expense.

Prevention is the key-Heartworm is almost percent preventable. The first step is to take your dog to a veterinarian at the onset of spring for a heartworm test. If results are negative, the vet will prescribe heartworm pills. Previously, the pills had to be given daily throughout the mosquito season. Today there`s Heartgard, istered only once a month. If you discover that giving your dog a pill is hard, heartworm medication also comes in liquid and chewable tablets but must be given daily.

Infected dogs can be saved-If a dog tests positive for heartworm, this doesn`t automatically spell death.

The disease can be cured, but treatment is lengthy, involving a endless stay in a veterinary hospital. And when a dog returns home, it remains feeble for fairly a while.

Never use ancient heartworm pills-Never be penny-wise and pill-foolish. Though giving your dog heartworm pills left over from the year before would save the expense of visiting the vet, don`t do it. You may simply incur another expense: disposal of your pet`s body. If a dog has already contracted heartworm and is given the pill, it can prove fatal.

The threat of heartworm persists-Despite the advent of effective heartworm treatment, which should own made the disease as »outmoded» as smallpox, cases of heartworm are increasing.

So if you feel you can`t afford to give a dog proper medical attention, you should not own a dog. It`s as simple as that. —

Dr. Huntington welcomes questions from readers. Although she cannot reply to them individually, she will answer those of general interest in this column. Record to Dr. Huntington, c/o The Chicago Tribune, N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. If your pet`s problem is urgent, consult your vet.

After informed consent, subjects will be randomly assigned to ILIT group or placebo group in double-blind manner.

In both group, causal allergen or placebo will be injected into inguinal lymph node through guidance by ultrasonography three times with 4-week interval. In ILIT group, initial dose of allergen will be 1,fold diluted solution from maximal concentration of allergen extract for subcutaneous immunotherapy (Tyrosine S, Allergy Therapeutic, West Sussex, UK) in volume of ml. If skin is highly reactive in skin prick test, the initial dose will be fold dilution from maximal concentration where diameter of wheal is less than that of histamine. After the first dose, allergen concentration will be escalated 3-fold at second dose, and fold at third dose if there are no (or mild) local or systemic hypersensitivity reaction.

The allergen concentration will not change at second or third dose if there is moderate local or systemic reaction. The allergen concentration will decrease by 10 or fold from previous concentration or further injection will be held if there is severe local or systemic reaction after sufficient explanation and discussion with subjects.

The investigators will assess allergic rhinitis symptom score before and 4, 12 months after the initial treatment. Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) and Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT) will be used.

Visual analogue scale (VAS) of symptoms including rhinorrhea, sneezing, nasal obstruction, postnasal drip, eye/nose/ear/palate itching, dyspnea, wheezing, chest discomfort as well as urticaria, angioedema, and itching on exposed skin during exposure to causal allergen in daily life will be also evaluated. Skin prick test (SPT), intradermal test (IDT), blood sampling for serum entire immunoglobulin E (IgE), allergen-specific IgE, and allergen-specific immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4), nasal lavage for Th1, Th2, and Treg cytokines, and nasal provocation test (NPT) with Df and/or Dp allergen (in subjects whose AR symptoms are provoked by Df and/or Dp) will be also performed before and 4, 12 months after the initial treatment.

In addition, the investigators evaluated the change of subjects’ recognition of causal allergens, their avoidance, and AIT during this study. Using VAS, subjects were requested to score the rate of agreement with "Allergen provokes allergic symptoms in daily life", "Allergen avoidance can reduce allergic symptoms", "Allergen-specific Immunotherapy (AIT) can reduce allergic symptoms", "I can pay 50, Korean Won (KRW)/month for allergen avoidance", "I can pay , KRW/month for allergen avoidance", "I can pay , KRW/month for allergen avoidance", "I can pay , KRW for each injection of ILIT", "I can pay , KRW for each injection of ILIT", "I can pay , KRW for each injection of ILIT" before and after SPT/IDT, after NPT, 4 months and 1 year after ILIT.

Adverse events will be recorded and graded according to Muller classification and Ring and Meissner classification.

Sarcoptic Mange: Save Your Dog’s Skin from Scabies

It sounds troubling, love something out of a gritty movie about the bad part of town: a dog walks by with mange, looking ragged, uncared-for and mad.

What is the best medication for dog allergies

Well, you’d be mad and ragged too if tiny mites caused you to lose your hair and itch severely. Thankfully, mange is not as scary as you may own heard, and it’s easily treatable.

What is mange on dogs?

The illness we call “mange” on dogs is actually sarcoptic mange, also known as canine scabies. It’s not an illness but rather an infestation of microscopic mites – the parasite known as Sarcoptes scaeibi.

While cats, foxes and even humans can get mange, these parasites particularly prefer dogs. Once on a host dog, the mites cause several skin problems, most notably hair loss and severe itching.

What are the symptoms of sarcoptic mange?

The most obvious symptoms of sarcoptic mange is severe itching and hair loss. The mites prefer to live in areas with less hair, so itching is often concentrated on the dog’s elbows, ears, chest, armpits and stomach. As the infestation worsens, the itching and hair loss spreads. The bites can also cause red pustules with yellow crusts.

If left untreated, the dog’s skin will start showing signs of severe irritation, such as redness and sores due to bacterial infections.

In fact, some doctors believe the irritation dogs feel is actually an allergic reaction to the mites’ bites.

How is sarcoptic mange diagnosed on dogs?

It can be challenging for you or your veterinarian to diagnose sarcoptic mange. When mange is suspected, your vet will scrape the dog’s skin to glance for the scabies under a microscope. Unfortunately, the mites only show up in about 20 percent of skin scrapings – so while a positive identification surely means the mites are present, a negative scraping does not really prove anything.

Therefore, the most common way to diagnose a dog for mange is to discuss the dog’s history, note if allergy treatments own been effective or failed, and to start treatment for scabies. If the dog improves with treatment, then a diagnosis of scabies may be confirmed.

How do you treat canine scabies?

There are a few approaches to treating sarcoptic mange in dogs.

  • Heartworm and flea prevention: Some vets will prescribe flea-prevention and heartworm-prevention medications love Revolution or Frontline to treat mange, but at the Animal Clinic of Woodruff, we own not seen these treatments to be effective in treating scabies.

    However, one medicine we’ve had success with at the Clinic is Bravecto. It’s a flea and tick prevention that is also effective at killing the scabies mite. We typically combine this medication with our bath protocol, but in mild cases, it may be used alone.

  • Medicinal baths: Our preferred and the most effective treatment is to bath the dog regularly in chemical shampoos. The dog will generally own his hair clipped short, then is dipped once/week for weeks.

    Unfortunately, the dip has a extremely foul smell and can be toxic to humans and vulnerable dogs, so grand care is needed in dipping dogs (and in treating their facial areas). When done correctly, the dips are extremely effectively.

  • Liquid ivermectin: This is a stronger version of the heartworm prevention medicine found in Heartguard. We will occasionally use this treatment, but it’s rarely a first choice. It should not be used for Collies, Shetland sheep dogs, or other herding breeds.

Along with treating the dog, the dog’s bedding and other areas can be treated with an insecticide.

And since scabies is spread among dogs, other dogs in the home should be treated.

Finally, due to the trauma on the dog’s skin, your vet will likely also need to prescribe medications to treat bacterial skin infections and/or yeast infections, and will also propose products to relieve itchy, sore skin.

Can humans get mange?

There are human versions of scabies, but that is a diverse animal than Sarcoptes scaeibi, which lives on dogs. That said, humans can contract scabies from pets, and might experience itching or rashes, especially on the wrists or hands.

If you see a rash or are itchy while your dog has scabies, see your doctor immediately.

How can I prevent mange and scabies in dogs?

There’s no way to fully protect your dog, as scabies is spread by contact with other dogs. Take care when your dog is surrounded by lots of other dogs. You should hold your dog away from foxes and places where foxes go, as they can carry scabies that will carry to dogs.

If you suspect your dog may own mange, contact Animal Clinic of Woodruff today to make an appointment with our veterinarians in Woodruff.

Posted in Pet Health Issues

One of the most mind-boggling choices dog and cat owners face is how to safely guard against fleas and ticks.

Those creepy crawlers aren’t just gross; they can transmit disease to both pets and people. Pets need protection, but numerous of the solutions on store shelves are loaded with chemicals that could be risky to their health—and yours.

So what’s a responsible pet lover to do? The key is to stop the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from allowing these harmful products to reach store shelves in the first put. Until the EPA does this, however, you can educate yourself about the risks and benefits of various treatment options, then bring that knowledge to the store.

There are ways to hold every your family members, including the furry ones, safe from dangerous pests and the most toxic ingredients.

The perils of pest protection

Most conventional flea and tick products—including collars, topical treatments, sprays, and dusts—are registered as pesticides and regulated by the EPA. (Those given orally, love pills, must be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug istration.) But here’s the ugly truth: Numerous of the pesticides allowed for use on pets are linked to serious health issues in people, such as cancer and neurological and respiratory problems. Pets can also suffer: Skin irritation, neurological problems, gastrointestinal disorders, and even organ failure own been reported as a result of pet poisonings.

The government has faced criticism from NRDC and other watchdog groups about insufficient safety standards for these products.

Consumers, as well as some veterinarians, don’t know the whole tale, says NRDC senior scientist Miriam Rotkin-Ellman.

What is the best medication for dog allergies

“Many vets count on the EPA to make certain that the products on the market are safe if used correctly.” Unfortunately, the ingredients in these products are still fairly dangerous, and regular use can result in unsafe exposure, particularly for children and pregnant women.

For example, even low-level exposure to organophosphates and carbamates—two particularly dangerous families of pesticides found in some flea treatments as well as in agricultural and lawn products—have been linked to learning disabilities in children.

For this reason, most household uses of these pesticides own already been banned. Unfortunately, kids can still be exposed to them from their furry siblings’ flea collars or other products.

Going nontoxic. Fortunately for numerous families, fleas can be controlled without resorting to harmful chemicals. Always attempt the strategies under first before considering chemicals—safer chemicals—if additional protection is needed. Here’s what you can do:

Groom your pets regularly. Common soap and water will kill adult fleas. In addition, comb your animal’s fur with a fine-tooth flea comb, and dunk any critters into a container of sudsy water.

Clean, clean, clean. Wash your pet’s bedding weekly in boiling, soapy water, and vacuum and wipe below pet-frequented surfaces often, including behind and underneath furniture and between sofa cushions.

If you’re the victim of a flea infestation, Karyn Bischoff, a toxicologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, recommends doing this daily. For severe cases, professional steam cleaning may be needed for your carpets.

Take preemptive steps in your yard and garden. It helps to put beneficial nematodes—worms that eat flea larvae—in the soil where your pet is likely to frolic. Discover them in garden supply stores or online.

Diatomaceous ground is a less toxic option for the home and yard, says Rotkin-Ellman, “but it can be really damaging if it is inhaled or gets into your or your pet’s eyes.” Use caution and protective gear, and use it only in areas where pets and kids won’t be exposed.

Glance for products marketed to control pests, and avoid the helpful used in swimming-pool systems.

Be wary of products marketed as “natural.” Sadly, there’s no magic nontoxic bullet to wipe out these pests. Natural products and herbal remedies should also be approached with caution. They may not work—and some aren’t safe, says Bischoff. Numerous of these contain peppermint, cinnamon, lemongrass, cedarwood, or rosemary oil.

While these may be safer than some of the synthetic chemicals, they own also been linked to allergies in both pets and humans, and not much is known about how well they actually work. If you give these a attempt, monitor your pet and family closely for adverse reactions.

Considering chemicals

There are varying degrees of harm when it comes to these products and the chemicals they contain. Work with your vet to craft a custom plan for your pet, and hold some basic guidelines in mind to spot safer products:

Ask about oral flea-prevention treatments. Pills with the athletic ingredients lufenuron, nitenpyram, or spinosad can be a better option, for both animals and humans, than treatments that leave residue on fur that might get on hands or furniture.

But oral meds need to be prescribed by a vet and are considerably more expensive, so they may not be a realistic option for every pet owners.

Identify safer ingredients. If chemical products are necessary for additional flea or tick control, NRDC recommends s-methoprene or pyriproxyfen, which are less toxic ingredients—but read the labels carefully because some products use them with other, more harmful pesticides. Avoid products that include synthetic neonicotinoids (like imidacloprid and dinotefuran), which are harmful to bees and may be toxic to the developing brain of young kids.

Be wary of flea collars. These products can contain some of the most dangerous insecticides, including tetrachlorvinphos, carbaryl, and propoxur.

Some of the collars posing the greatest risk are already being phased out of production, and NRDC is suing the EPA to ban the relax. Until that happens (and until older products are off store shelves entirely), either avoid collars altogether or be vigilant about searching labels for those specific athletic ingredients.

Use additional caution with tick products. When it comes to tick prevention—or combination flea-and-tick products—the news is even grimmer. Most products designed to repel these buggers include possible carcinogens and nervous-system toxins love fipronil, permethrin, pyrethrins, or imidacloprid. “Our recommendation for ticks is to use the least toxic option available, at the lowest level, and only when you need it,” Rotkin-Ellman says.

If you live in an area where ticks and Lyme disease are prevalent, you probably need protection—but talk to your vet about how much and how often. Pregnant women and young children should minimize their exposure.

Buy a species-specific product. Two common ingredients in flea-and-tick products, permethrin and pyrethrins, are extremely toxic to cats. Don’t put these ingredients on your dog, either, if you also own a cat that could snuggle up with or brush against it.

Choose the correct formula for your pet’s weight. An EPA investigation showed that little dogs (10 to 20 pounds) were most likely to own reactions such as rashes, vomiting, diarrhea, and seizures from topical treatments.

Dogs that are ancient, young, ill, or on meds are also at higher risk. (Flea and tick control can interfere with other medications, rendering them ineffective or even poisonous.) There are even breed-specific sensitivities, so a conversation with your vet is in order before you decide how to proceed.

Don’t rely on shampoos. Flea and tick shampoo may seem love a safer, more cost-effective option, but they often contain numerous of the same ingredients as topical treatments and can cause adverse reactions and allergies, Bischoff says. Moreover, they’re not meant to take the put of preventive options.

“You’d use a shampoo for an animal with an infestation and then, generally, follow up with a topical treatment,” she says. Read labels, and take the same precautions with shampoos as you would with spot-on or collar products.

Report health issues immediately. If you or your pet reacts to a pet product containing pesticides, call your local poison control middle, talk to your doctor, and, later, report it to the National Pesticide Information Middle at

I own had excellent graces of reviving a save Boston terrier in December of starving to death and at the peak of death , nursed her back to health.

My wife named her Angel because I had a stroke and needed a companion,she gave me hope and the only thing is she scraped and had a skin disorder.I tried everything food ,location shampoo and at my wits finish the I talked to Nat,which is short for Nathanial I called and got the best costumer service person in the world explained this to him and he was amazing recommended Cushex drops salive this is amazing product angel would sleep drank water every time and panted every the time order received the product next angel crushed X s and amazingI own had excellent graces of reviving a save Boston terrier in December of starving to death and at the peak of death , nursed her back to health.

My wife named her Angel because I had a stroke and needed a companion,she gave me hope and the only thing is she scraped and had a skin disorder.I tried everything food ,location shampoo and at my wits finish the I talked to Nat,which is short for Nathanial I called and got the best costumer service person in the world explained this to him and he was amazing recommended Cushex drops salive this is amazing product angel would sleep drank water every time and panted every the time order received the product next angel crushed X s and amazing she sleep every night and stop during piles of water and made s turn around % this is amazing stuff my dog is my angel and nat is my angel at chewy!!!… more

Along with treating the dog, the dog’s bedding and other areas can be treated with an insecticide.

And since scabies is spread among dogs, other dogs in the home should be treated.

Finally, due to the trauma on the dog’s skin, your vet will likely also need to prescribe medications to treat bacterial skin infections and/or yeast infections, and will also propose products to relieve itchy, sore skin.

Can humans get mange?

There are human versions of scabies, but that is a diverse animal than Sarcoptes scaeibi, which lives on dogs. That said, humans can contract scabies from pets, and might experience itching or rashes, especially on the wrists or hands.

If you see a rash or are itchy while your dog has scabies, see your doctor immediately.

How can I prevent mange and scabies in dogs?

There’s no way to fully protect your dog, as scabies is spread by contact with other dogs. Take care when your dog is surrounded by lots of other dogs. You should hold your dog away from foxes and places where foxes go, as they can carry scabies that will carry to dogs.

If you suspect your dog may own mange, contact Animal Clinic of Woodruff today to make an appointment with our veterinarians in Woodruff.

Posted in Pet Health Issues

One of the most mind-boggling choices dog and cat owners face is how to safely guard against fleas and ticks.

Those creepy crawlers aren’t just gross; they can transmit disease to both pets and people. Pets need protection, but numerous of the solutions on store shelves are loaded with chemicals that could be risky to their health—and yours.

So what’s a responsible pet lover to do? The key is to stop the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from allowing these harmful products to reach store shelves in the first put. Until the EPA does this, however, you can educate yourself about the risks and benefits of various treatment options, then bring that knowledge to the store. There are ways to hold every your family members, including the furry ones, safe from dangerous pests and the most toxic ingredients.

The perils of pest protection

Most conventional flea and tick products—including collars, topical treatments, sprays, and dusts—are registered as pesticides and regulated by the EPA.

(Those given orally, love pills, must be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug istration.) But here’s the ugly truth: Numerous of the pesticides allowed for use on pets are linked to serious health issues in people, such as cancer and neurological and respiratory problems. Pets can also suffer: Skin irritation, neurological problems, gastrointestinal disorders, and even organ failure own been reported as a result of pet poisonings.

The government has faced criticism from NRDC and other watchdog groups about insufficient safety standards for these products. Consumers, as well as some veterinarians, don’t know the whole tale, says NRDC senior scientist Miriam Rotkin-Ellman.

“Many vets count on the EPA to make certain that the products on the market are safe if used correctly.” Unfortunately, the ingredients in these products are still fairly dangerous, and regular use can result in unsafe exposure, particularly for children and pregnant women.

For example, even low-level exposure to organophosphates and carbamates—two particularly dangerous families of pesticides found in some flea treatments as well as in agricultural and lawn products—have been linked to learning disabilities in children. For this reason, most household uses of these pesticides own already been banned.

What is the best medication for dog allergies

Unfortunately, kids can still be exposed to them from their furry siblings’ flea collars or other products.

Going nontoxic. Fortunately for numerous families, fleas can be controlled without resorting to harmful chemicals. Always attempt the strategies under first before considering chemicals—safer chemicals—if additional protection is needed. Here’s what you can do:

Groom your pets regularly. Common soap and water will kill adult fleas. In addition, comb your animal’s fur with a fine-tooth flea comb, and dunk any critters into a container of sudsy water.

Clean, clean, clean. Wash your pet’s bedding weekly in boiling, soapy water, and vacuum and wipe below pet-frequented surfaces often, including behind and underneath furniture and between sofa cushions.

If you’re the victim of a flea infestation, Karyn Bischoff, a toxicologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, recommends doing this daily. For severe cases, professional steam cleaning may be needed for your carpets.

Take preemptive steps in your yard and garden. It helps to put beneficial nematodes—worms that eat flea larvae—in the soil where your pet is likely to frolic. Discover them in garden supply stores or online.

Diatomaceous ground is a less toxic option for the home and yard, says Rotkin-Ellman, “but it can be really damaging if it is inhaled or gets into your or your pet’s eyes.” Use caution and protective gear, and use it only in areas where pets and kids won’t be exposed.

What is the best medication for dog allergies

Glance for products marketed to control pests, and avoid the helpful used in swimming-pool systems.

Be wary of products marketed as “natural.” Sadly, there’s no magic nontoxic bullet to wipe out these pests. Natural products and herbal remedies should also be approached with caution. They may not work—and some aren’t safe, says Bischoff. Numerous of these contain peppermint, cinnamon, lemongrass, cedarwood, or rosemary oil. While these may be safer than some of the synthetic chemicals, they own also been linked to allergies in both pets and humans, and not much is known about how well they actually work. If you give these a attempt, monitor your pet and family closely for adverse reactions.

Considering chemicals

There are varying degrees of harm when it comes to these products and the chemicals they contain.

Work with your vet to craft a custom plan for your pet, and hold some basic guidelines in mind to spot safer products:

Ask about oral flea-prevention treatments. Pills with the athletic ingredients lufenuron, nitenpyram, or spinosad can be a better option, for both animals and humans, than treatments that leave residue on fur that might get on hands or furniture. But oral meds need to be prescribed by a vet and are considerably more expensive, so they may not be a realistic option for every pet owners.

Identify safer ingredients. If chemical products are necessary for additional flea or tick control, NRDC recommends s-methoprene or pyriproxyfen, which are less toxic ingredients—but read the labels carefully because some products use them with other, more harmful pesticides.

Avoid products that include synthetic neonicotinoids (like imidacloprid and dinotefuran), which are harmful to bees and may be toxic to the developing brain of young kids.

Be wary of flea collars. These products can contain some of the most dangerous insecticides, including tetrachlorvinphos, carbaryl, and propoxur. Some of the collars posing the greatest risk are already being phased out of production, and NRDC is suing the EPA to ban the relax. Until that happens (and until older products are off store shelves entirely), either avoid collars altogether or be vigilant about searching labels for those specific athletic ingredients.

Use additional caution with tick products. When it comes to tick prevention—or combination flea-and-tick products—the news is even grimmer.

Most products designed to repel these buggers include possible carcinogens and nervous-system toxins love fipronil, permethrin, pyrethrins, or imidacloprid.

What is the best medication for dog allergies

“Our recommendation for ticks is to use the least toxic option available, at the lowest level, and only when you need it,” Rotkin-Ellman says. If you live in an area where ticks and Lyme disease are prevalent, you probably need protection—but talk to your vet about how much and how often. Pregnant women and young children should minimize their exposure.

Buy a species-specific product. Two common ingredients in flea-and-tick products, permethrin and pyrethrins, are extremely toxic to cats. Don’t put these ingredients on your dog, either, if you also own a cat that could snuggle up with or brush against it.

Choose the correct formula for your pet’s weight. An EPA investigation showed that little dogs (10 to 20 pounds) were most likely to own reactions such as rashes, vomiting, diarrhea, and seizures from topical treatments.

Dogs that are ancient, young, ill, or on meds are also at higher risk. (Flea and tick control can interfere with other medications, rendering them ineffective or even poisonous.) There are even breed-specific sensitivities, so a conversation with your vet is in order before you decide how to proceed.

Don’t rely on shampoos. Flea and tick shampoo may seem love a safer, more cost-effective option, but they often contain numerous of the same ingredients as topical treatments and can cause adverse reactions and allergies, Bischoff says. Moreover, they’re not meant to take the put of preventive options. “You’d use a shampoo for an animal with an infestation and then, generally, follow up with a topical treatment,” she says.

Read labels, and take the same precautions with shampoos as you would with spot-on or collar products.

Report health issues immediately. If you or your pet reacts to a pet product containing pesticides, call your local poison control middle, talk to your doctor, and, later, report it to the National Pesticide Information Middle at

I own had excellent graces of reviving a save Boston terrier in December of starving to death and at the peak of death , nursed her back to health.

My wife named her Angel because I had a stroke and needed a companion,she gave me hope and the only thing is she scraped and had a skin disorder.I tried everything food ,location shampoo and at my wits finish the I talked to Nat,which is short for Nathanial I called and got the best costumer service person in the world explained this to him and he was amazing recommended Cushex drops salive this is amazing product angel would sleep drank water every time and panted every the time order received the product next angel crushed X s and amazingI own had excellent graces of reviving a save Boston terrier in December of starving to death and at the peak of death , nursed her back to health.

My wife named her Angel because I had a stroke and needed a companion,she gave me hope and the only thing is she scraped and had a skin disorder.I tried everything food ,location shampoo and at my wits finish the I talked to Nat,which is short for Nathanial I called and got the best costumer service person in the world explained this to him and he was amazing recommended Cushex drops salive this is amazing product angel would sleep drank water every time and panted every the time order received the product next angel crushed X s and amazing she sleep every night and stop during piles of water and made s turn around % this is amazing stuff my dog is my angel and nat is my angel at chewy!!!… more


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