What is the allergy count today

Thankfully, there are several options for relieving pollen allergy symptoms, available both over-the-counter and by prescription. Talk to your doctor or a board-certified allergist about your symptoms and treatment options. Your doctor might own you take a combination of medicines to hold your symptoms controlled. These medicines include:

  1. Leukotriene (loo-kuh-trahy-een) receptors
  2. Nasal corticosteroids
  3. Antihistamines
  4. Decongestants
  5. Cromolyn sodium nose spray

If these medicines don’t completely relieve your symptoms, your doctor might also give you immunotherapy.

This is a long-term treatment that can reduce the severity of your allergic reactions. It generally involves regular shots, tablets or drops you take under the tongue.

You can also take steps to reduce your exposure to tree pollen:

  1. Dry your clothes in a dryer and not exterior on a clothes line.
  2. Keep your windows closed and use a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter on your central air conditioner.
  3. Learn about the trees in your area and when they produce the most pollen. For example, oak tree pollen is highest in the morning. If you are allergic to oak pollen, save your outdoor activities for later in the day.
  4. Start taking allergy medicinebefore pollen season begins.
  5. If you haven’t had allergy testing, discover a board-certified allergist to test you for pollen allergies.

    Work with your doctor to come up with a treatment plan.

  6. Avoid pets that spend a lot of time outdoors.
  7. Watch pollen counts on a website love theNational Allergy Bureau™.
  8. Change and wash clothes you wear during outdoor activities.

It may be hard to avoid tree pollen during the tardy winter and spring. But you can reduce your symptoms with the correct treatment.

Medical ReviewFebruary

References
1. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) | AAAAI. (n.d.). Retrieved February 26, , from

It is significant to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies. By joining our community and following our blog, you will get news about research and treatments.

Our community also provides an chance to join with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

What Can I Do to Relieve My Pollen Allergy Symptoms?

Thankfully, there are several options for relieving pollen allergy symptoms, available both over-the-counter and by prescription. Talk to your doctor or a board-certified allergist about your symptoms and treatment options. Your doctor might own you take a combination of medicines to hold your symptoms controlled.

These medicines include:

  1. Leukotriene (loo-kuh-trahy-een) receptors
  2. Nasal corticosteroids
  3. Antihistamines
  4. Decongestants
  5. Cromolyn sodium nose spray

If these medicines don’t completely relieve your symptoms, your doctor might also give you immunotherapy. This is a long-term treatment that can reduce the severity of your allergic reactions. It generally involves regular shots, tablets or drops you take under the tongue.

You can also take steps to reduce your exposure to tree pollen:

  1. Dry your clothes in a dryer and not exterior on a clothes line.
  2. Keep your windows closed and use a CERTIFIED asthma & allergy friendly® filter on your central air conditioner.
  3. Learn about the trees in your area and when they produce the most pollen.

    For example, oak tree pollen is highest in the morning. If you are allergic to oak pollen, save your outdoor activities for later in the day.

  4. Start taking allergy medicinebefore pollen season begins.
  5. If you haven’t had allergy testing, discover a board-certified allergist to test you for pollen allergies. Work with your doctor to come up with a treatment plan.
  6. Avoid pets that spend a lot of time outdoors.
  7. Watch pollen counts on a website love theNational Allergy Bureau™.
  8. Change and wash clothes you wear during outdoor activities.

It may be hard to avoid tree pollen during the tardy winter and spring.

But you can reduce your symptoms with the correct treatment.

Medical ReviewFebruary

References
1. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) | AAAAI. (n.d.).

What is the allergy count today

Retrieved February 26, , from

It is significant to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies. By joining our community and following our blog, you will get news about research and treatments. Our community also provides an chance to join with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

JOIN NOW

For Immediate Release Contact: Jo Ann Faber at () [email protected]

Changes in Weather May Trigger Kid s Asthma

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill., September 14, Changes in humidity and temperature result in an increase in Emergency Department (ED) visits for pediatric asthma exacerbations according to a report published this month in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

"We found a strong relationship between temperature and humidity fluctuations with pediatric asthma exacerbations, but not barometric pressure," said Dr.

Nana A. Mireku, an allergist at Dallas Allergy Immunology private practice in Dallas, formerly at Children s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit.

What is the allergy count today

"To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrated these correlations after controlling for levels of airborne pollutants and common aeroallergens.

"Our study is also one of the few to examine the possibility that the weather one or two days before the asthma exacerbation may be as significant as that on the day of admission, as the additional ED visits happen one to two days after the fluctuation," she said.

According to the report, patients experiencing an asthma attack often complain that weather fluctuations are a major trigger.

Dr. Mireku said, "the latest National Institutes of Health guidelines list change in weather as a possible precipitating factor for asthma, but no previous studies own really examined this potential trigger in a rigorous fashion."

The retrospective 2-year study was performed at a large urban hospital of 25, children visiting the ED for an asthma exacerbation. Data on climactic factors, pollutants and aeroallergens were collected daily. The relationship of daily or between-day changes in climactic factors and asthma ED visits was evaluated using time series analysis, controlling for seasonality, air pollution and aeroallergen exposure.

The effects of climactic factors were evaluated on the day of admission and up to five days before admission.

A 10 percent daily increase in humidity on a day or two before admission was associated with approximately one additional ED visit for asthma. Between-day changes in humidity from two to three days prior to admission were also associated with more ED visits. Daily changes in temperature on the day of or the day before admission increased ED visits, with a 10 F increase being association with additional visits.

Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the lung airways that causes coughing, chest tightness, wheezing or shortness of breath.

More than 22 million Americans own asthma, including million under age

"Asthma is the most common chronic illness in childhood," said allergist Richard G. Gower, M.D., president of ACAAI. "Allergists own endless known that weather conditions such as extremely dry, wet or windy weather can affect asthma symptoms. This study further defines the role of temperature and humidity on children s asthma and confirms the importance of working with patients to identify the source of their symptoms and develop treatment plans that assist prevent them."

Patient information on asthma and other allergic diseases is available by visiting the ACAAI Web site at

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) is a professional medical organization headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill., that promotes excellence in the practice of the subspecialty of allergy and immunology.

What is the allergy count today

The College, comprising more than 5, allergists-immunologists and related health care professionals, fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research.

###

Citation: Mireku N, et al. Changes in weather and the effects on pediatric asthma exacerbations. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ;

Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology is online at

Colonization with the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium was significantly and independently associated with food allergy in young children with eczema enrolled in a pivotal peanut allergy prevention study.

is a marker for severe eczema, and early eczema is a widely recognized risk factor for developing food allergies in young children.

But the findings from the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study cohort show that even after controlling for eczema severity, skin S.

aureus positivity was associated with an increased risk for developing allergies to peanuts, eggs, and cow’s milk.

S. aureus colonization was also associated with persistent egg allergy until at least age 5 or 6 years in the LEAP cohort analysis in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The lead researcher, Olympia Tsilochristou, MD, of Kings College London, said in a press statement that the findings could assist explain why young children with eczema own a extremely high risk for developing food allergies. While the exact mechanisms linking the two are not known, «our results propose that the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus could be an significant factor contributing to this outcome,» she said.

The findings also propose that S.

aureus colonization may inhibit peanut tolerance among at-risk infants when peanuts are introduced extremely early in life.

Among the nine participants in the peanut-consumption arm of the study (i.e., no peanut allergy at baseline) who had confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, every but one were colonized with S.

What is the allergy count today

aureus at one or more LEAP study visits.

«The fact that S. aureus was associated with greater risk of peanut allergy among peanut consumers but not peanut avoiders further suggests that peanut consumption was less effective in the prevention of peanut allergy among participants with S. aureus compared with those with no S. aureus,» the researchers wrote.

The LEAP study enrolled infants ages months with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both. The babies were randomized to therapeutic peanut consumption or peanut avoidance, and every had eczema clinical evaluation and culture of skin and nasal swabs at baseline.

The follow-up LEAP-On study assessed the children at age 72 months, after 12 months of peanut avoidance in both groups.

Skin and nasal swabs were obtained at baseline and at age 12, 30, and 60 months.

A entire of % of the participants had some form of S. aureus colonization (% skin and % nasal) on at least one LEAP study visit, with most having just one positive test result. The greatest rates of colonization were recorded at months of age.

S. aureus colonization was significantly associated with eczema severity, along with hen’s egg white and peanut specific immunoglobulin (sIg)E production at any LEAP visit.

But even after controlling for eczema severity, hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE levels at each LEAP and LEAP-On visit were significantly associated with skin S. aureus positivity, the team noted.

«This relationship was even stronger when we looked into high-level hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE production,» the researchers wrote. «Similar findings were noted for cow’s milk, where high-level sIgE production to milk at 30, 60, and 72 months of age was related to any skin S. aureus colonization. Together, these data propose that S.

What is the allergy count today

aureus is associated with hen’s egg, peanut, and cow’s milk allergy.»

In the LEAP study, extremely early peanut consumption was found to reduce the risk of peanut allergy at 60 months in infants at high risk for developing the allergy, but infants in the consumption arm of the study with S. aureus colonization were approximately seven and four times more likely to own confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, the team said.

Study strengths, Tsilochristou and co-authors noted, included the rigorous design; a limitation was the reliance on bacteriological culture to identify S. aureus colonization rather than using DNA-based testing.

«S.

aureus has been implicated in the development and severity of atopic diseases, namely eczema, allergic rhinitis, and asthma; our findings extend these observations to the development of food allergy independent of eczema severity,» the investigators concluded.

«The role of S. aureus as a potential environmental factor should be considered in future interventions aimed at inducing and maintaining tolerance to food allergens in eczematous infants. Further prospective longitudinal studies measuring S. aureus with more advanced techniques and interventional studies eradicating S.

aureus in early infancy will assist elucidate its role in the development of eczema or food allergy,» the team wrote.


What Trees Cause the Most Symptoms?

Some tree pollen causes more problems than others. Some of the trees that cause the most symptoms are:

  1. Beech
  2. Cottonwood
  3. Mulberry
  4. Mountain elder
  5. Cedar
  6. Olive
  7. Birch
  8. Alder
  9. Pecan
  10. Elm
  11. Ash
  12. Aspen
  13. Poplar
  14. Oak
  15. Hickory
  16. Box elder
  17. Willow

Being allergic to some trees could cause you to react to certain foods. It happens because the tree pollen is similar to the protein in some fruits, vegetables and nuts.1Your immune system gets confused and can’t tell the difference between the two.

Eating these foods may cause your mouth or face to itch or swell. These foods may include apples, cherries, pears and more.

What is the allergy count today

This is called oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Birch and alder trees cause the most OAS food reactions.

In some cases, your tree pollen allergy may cross-react with some nuts, love peanuts or almonds.

What is the allergy count today

If you own mouth itching or swelling while eating nuts, you could own a more serious, life-threatening reaction calledanaphylaxis, which is common with nut allergies. If this happens to you, call your doctor correct away.


What Are the Symptoms of a Tree Pollen Allergy?

Pollen allergysymptoms are commonly called “hay fever.” Pollen released by trees, as well as grasses and weeds, cause these symptoms. They include:

  1. Sneezing
  2. Itchy nose, eyes, ears and mouth
  3. Stuffy nose (nasal congestion)
  4. Red and watery eyes
  5. Runny nose and mucus production
  6. Swelling around the eyes

If you haveallergic asthmaand are allergic to tree pollen, you might also own asthma symptoms while the trees are pollinating.

Tree pollen is finer than other pollens.

Because of this, the wind can carry it for miles. These light, dry grains easily discover their way to your sinuses, lungs and eyes, making them hard to avoid.


Robert S. Call, M.D.

Robert S. Call, M.D.received his allergy training at the University of Virginia and remained on staff as an Instructor in Medicine for 2 years teaching and researching Asthma before moving to Richmond. Prior to his fellowship in Allergy, he did his Internal Medicine training at Michigan State University, Grand Rapids Campus.

He is a Graduate of University of Virginia’s Medical School and School of Arts and Sciences where he received an MD and a BA in Biology.

Currently, Dr. Call practices full time treating adults and children with allergies. His special interests include food allergy and exercise induced asthma. He also owns and is President of Clinical Research Partners(CRP), a clinical trial company. CRP performs clinical trials in allergy and other internal medicine related areas. In , he was appointed by the Governor of Virginia to the Commonwealth Health Research Board (CHRB) and was the Chair until CHRB provides funding to universities, hospitals and other facilities throughout the State of Virginia for research projects that benefit the citizens of Virginia.

Previously, Dr. Call served as the President of the Allergy and Asthma Society of Virginia, a 2 year post, and as President and Chairman of the Board of the Richmond Academy of Medicine.

Dr. Call’s favorite thing to do exterior of allergy is spending time with his wife, Mary, and his 4 lovely daughters.

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For several years running, Dr.

What is the allergy count today

Call has been named a Top Doc by Richmond Magazine.

When spring allergy season first starts, causing you to sniffle and sneeze, tree pollen is to blame. Trees start producing pollen as early as January in the Southern U.S. Numerous trees hold producing pollen through June.


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