What is skin allergy hives

Atopic Eczema (Dermatitis)

Eczema is a pattern of itchy skin rash consisting of tiny pink bumps that may join together producing ill-defined pink or red patches. There are numerous types of eczema – some own known causes. Dermatitis is the term used for eczema reactions that are caused by external agents/factors. Atopic eczema is often referred to as “infantile” of childhood eczema because that is when it generally develops. Atopic eczema is generally associated with allergies (hayfever or asthma) in either the affected individuals or in their shut relatives. Read more

Food Allergy and Food Intolerance

If someone reacts to a food, they may own a Food Hypersensitivity (FHS).

FHS reactions involving the immune system are known as food allergy (FA), every other reactions are classified as food intolerances (FI). Read more

Drug Allergy

Prescription drugs own been through a rigorous process of testing to ensure safety, despite this, a minority of individuals will develop side-effects. Side- effects are termed “adverse drug reactions” by doctors and although the majority of adverse drug reactions are relatively minor and may even permit continuation with the drug, in some cases more severe symptoms can more

Asthma

What is asthma?
Asthma is a condition that causes swelling and inflammation inside the airways of the lungs.

This inflammation and swelling is there to a greater or lesser degree every the time in people with more inflammation there is the harder it becomes to breathe. People with asthma also own over-sensitive airways, so their airways react to triggers that do not affect other people. When sufferers come into contact with something that irritates their airways (a trigger), it can cause their airways to narrow. Read more

Rhinitis

Rhinitis means inflammation of the lining of the nose Rhinitis is defined clinically as symptoms of runny nose itching, sneezing and nasal blockage (congestion)..

Common causes of rhinitis are allergies which may be seasonal (‘hayfever’) or happen all-year-round (examples include allergy to home dust mite, cats, dogs and moulds).Infections which may be acute or chronic represent another common cause. Rhinitis (whether due to allergic or other causes) is a risk factor for the development of asthma. Rhinitis is also implicated in otitis media with effusion and in sinusitis which should rightly be termed rhinosinusitis since sinus inflammation almost always involves the nasal passages as well. Read more

Allergy in Children

The bulk of allergic disease occurs in childhood, with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema and food allergy comprising a significant percentage of the workload of doctors dealing with children in primary care and hospital paediatric departments.

In a recent large UK survey, 20% of children were reported to own had asthma in the previous year, 18% had allergic rhino conjunctivitis (hay fever) and 16% had eczema. This represents a massive increase in prevalence compared with similar studies in the s where prevalence rates were 3 fold lower. Of these children 47% had at least two co-existing conditions e.g. asthma and eczema. Read more

Skin Allergy

The allergic process can affect the skin producing 2 main types of rashes namely urticaria (hives, nettlerash, welts) or eczema (see atopic dermatitis section).

Urticaria is a red itchy bumpy rash that is often short-lived and can appear in various shapes and sizes anywhere on the is extremely common affecting 1 in 5 of the population at sometime in their some people urticaria is accompanied by large dramatic swellings commonly affecting lips, eyelids, tongue and hand called angioedema.

Read more

Skin Disorders

A. What skin disorders do we assess with these listings?

We use these listings to assess skin disorders that may result from hereditary, congenital, or acquired pathological processes. The kinds of impairments covered by these listings are: Ichthyosis, bullous diseases, chronic infections of the skin or mucous membranes, dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, genetic photosensitivity disorders, and burns.

B. What documentation do we need?

When we assess the existence and severity of your skin disorder, we generally need information about the onset, duration, frequency of flare-ups, and prognosis of your skin disorder; the location, size, and appearance of lesions; and, when applicable, history of exposure to toxins, allergens, or irritants, familial incidence, seasonal variation, stress factors, and your ability to function exterior of a highly protective environment.

To confirm the diagnosis, we may need laboratory findings (for example, results of a biopsy obtained independently of Social Security disability evaluation or blood tests) or evidence from other medically acceptable methods consistent with the prevailing state of medical knowledge and clinical practice.

C. How do we assess the severity of your skin disorder(s)?

We generally base our assessment of severity on the extent of your skin lesions, the frequency of flare-ups of your skin lesions, how your symptoms (including pain) limit you, the extent of your treatment, and how your treatment affects you.

1.

Extensive skin lesions.

Extensive skin lesions are those that involve multiple body sites or critical body areas, and result in a extremely serious limitation. Examples of extensive skin lesions that result in a extremely serious limitation include but are not limited to:

a. Skin lesions that interfere with the motion of your joints and that extremely seriously limit your use of more than one extremity; that is, two upper extremities, two lower extremities, or one upper and one lower extremity.

b. Skin lesions on the palms of both hands that extremely seriously limit your ability to do fine and gross motor movements.

c. Skin lesions on the soles of both feet, the perineum, or both inguinal areas that extremely seriously limit your ability to ambulate.

2. Frequency of flare-ups.

If you own skin lesions, but they do not meet the requirements of any of the listings in this body system, you may still own an impairment that prevents you from doing any gainful activity when we consider your condition over time, especially if your flare-ups result in extensive skin lesions, as defined in C1 of this section.

Therefore, if you own frequent flare-ups, we may discover that your impairment(s) is medically equal to one of these listings even though you own some periods during which your condition is in remission. We will consider how frequent and serious your flare-ups are, how quickly they resolve, and how you function between flare-ups to determine whether you own been unable to do any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months or can be expected to be unable to do any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months.

We will also consider the frequency of your flare-ups when we determine whether you own a severe impairment and when we need to assess your residual functional capacity.

3. Symptoms (including pain).

Symptoms (including pain) may be significant factors contributing to the severity of your skin disorder(s). We assess the impact of symptoms as explained in §§ , , , and of this chapter.

4. Treatment.

We assess the effects of medication, therapy, surgery, and any other form of treatment you get when we determine the severity and duration of your impairment(s).

Skin disorders frequently reply to treatment; however, response to treatment can vary widely, with some impairments becoming resistant to treatment. Some treatments can own side effects that can in themselves result in limitations.

a. We assess the effects of continuing treatment as prescribed by determining if there is improvement in the symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings of your disorder, and if you experience side effects that result in functional limitations. To assess the effects of your treatment, we may need information about:

i. The treatment you own been prescribed (for example, the type, dosage, method, and frequency of istration of medication or therapy);

ii.

Your response to the treatment;

iii. Any adverse effects of the treatment; and

iv. The expected duration of the treatment.

b. Because treatment itself or the effects of treatment may be temporary, in most cases sufficient time must elapse to permit us to assess the impact and expected duration of treatment and its side effects. Except under and , you must follow continuing treatment as prescribed for at least 3 months before your impairment can be sure to meet the requirements of a skin disorder listing. (See H if you are not undergoing treatment or did not own treatment for 3 months.) We consider your specific response to treatment when we assess the overall severity of your impairment.

Back to Top

D. How do we assess impairments that may affect the skin and other body systems?

When your impairment affects your skin and has effects in other body systems, we first assess the predominant feature of your impairment under the appropriate body system. Examples include, but are not limited to the following.

1. Tuberous sclerosis primarily affects the brain. The predominant features are seizures, which we assess under the neurological listings in , and developmental delays or other mental disorders, which we assess under the mental disorders listings in

2.

Malignant tumors of the skin (for example, malignant melanomas) are cancers, or neoplastic diseases, which we assess under the listings in

3. Autoimmune disorders and other immune system disorders (for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and Sjögren’s syndrome) often involve more than one body system. We first assess these disorders under the immune system disorders listings in We assess SLE under , scleroderma under , Sjögren’s syndrome under , and HIV infection under

4. Disfigurement or deformity resulting from skin lesions may result in loss of sight, hearing, lecture, and the ability to chew (mastication).

We assess these impairments and their effects under the special senses and lecture listings in and the digestive system listings in Facial disfigurement or other physical deformities may also own effects we assess under the mental disorders listings in , such as when they affect mood or social functioning.

E. How do we assess genetic photosensitivity disorders?

1. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). When you own XP, your impairment meets the requirements of A if you own clinical and laboratory findings showing that you own the disorder.

(See E3.) People who own XP own a lifelong hypersensitivity to every forms of ultraviolet light and generally lead extremely restricted lives in highly protective environments in order to prevent skin cancers from developing. Some people with XP also experience problems with their eyes, neurological problems, mental disorders, and problems in other body systems.

2. Other genetic photosensitivity disorders.

Other genetic photosensitivity disorders may vary in their effects on diverse people, and may not result in an inability to engage in any gainful activity for a continuous period of at least 12 months. Therefore, if you own a genetic photosensitivity disorder other than XP (established by clinical and laboratory findings as described in E3), you must show that you own either extensive skin lesions or an inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment to meet the requirements of B.

You must also show that your impairment meets the duration requirement. By inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment we mean that you must avoid exposure to ultraviolet light (including sunlight passing through windows and light from unshielded fluorescent bulbs), wear protective clothing and eyeglasses, and use opaque wide spectrum sunscreens in order to avoid skin cancer or other serious effects. Some genetic photosensitivity disorders can own extremely serious effects in other body systems, especially special senses and lecture (), neurological (), mental (), and neoplastic (). We will assess the predominant feature of your impairment under the appropriate body system, as explained in D.

3. Clinical and laboratory findings.

a. General. We need documentation from an acceptable medical source to establish that you own a medically determinable impairment. In general, we must own evidence of appropriate laboratory testing showing that you own XP or another genetic photosensitivity disorder. We will discover that you own XP or another genetic photosensitivity disorder based on a report from an acceptable medical source indicating that you own the impairment, supported by definitive genetic laboratory studies documenting appropriate chromosomal changes, including abnormal DNA repair or another DNA or genetic abnormality specific to your type of photosensitivity disorder.

b. What we will accept as medical evidence instead of the actual laboratory report. When we do not own the actual laboratory report, we need evidence from an acceptable medical source that includes appropriate clinical findings for your impairment and that is persuasive that a positive diagnosis has been confirmed by appropriate laboratory testing at some time prior to our evaluation. To be persuasive, the report must state that the appropriate definitive genetic laboratory study was conducted and that the results confirmed the diagnosis.

The report must be consistent with other evidence in your case record.

F. How do we assess burns?

Electrical, chemical, or thermal burns frequently affect other body systems; for example, musculoskeletal, special senses and lecture, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, neurological, or mental. Consequently, we assess burns the way we assess other disorders that can affect the skin and other body systems, using the listing for the predominant feature of your impairment.

For example, if your soft tissue injuries are under continuing surgical management (as defined in M), we will assess your impairment under However, if your burns do not meet the requirements of and you own extensive skin lesions that result in a extremely serious limitation (as defined in C1) that has lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months, we will assess them under

G. How do we determine if your skin disorder(s) will continue at a disabling level of severity in order to meet the duration requirement?

For every of these skin disorder listings except and , we will discover that your impairment meets the duration requirement if your skin disorder results in extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

By persist, we mean that the longitudinal clinical record shows that, with few exceptions, your lesions own been at the level of severity specified in the listing. For A, we will presume that you meet the duration requirement. For B and , we will consider every of the relevant medical and other information in your case record to determine whether your skin disorder meets the duration requirement.

H. How do we assess your skin disorder(s) if your impairment does not meet the requirements of one of these listings?

1. These listings are only examples of common skin disorders that we consider severe enough to prevent you from engaging in any gainful activity. For most of these listings, if you do not own continuing treatment as prescribed, if your treatment has not lasted for at least 3 months, or if you do not own extensive skin lesions that own persisted for at least 3 months, your impairment cannot meet the requirements of these skin disorder listings. (This provision does not apply to and ) However, we may still discover that you are disabled because your impairment(s) meets the requirements of a listing in another body system or medically equals the severity of a listing.

(See §§ and of this chapter.) We may also discover you disabled at the final step of the sequential evaluation process.

2. If you own not received ongoing treatment or do not own an ongoing relationship with the medical community despite the existence of a severe impairment(s), or if your skin lesions own not persisted for at least 3 months but you are undergoing continuing treatment as prescribed, you may still own an impairment(s) that meets a listing in another body system or that medically equals a listing.

If you do not own an impairment(s) that meets or medically equals a listing, we will assess your residual functional capacity and proceed to the fourth and, if necessary, the fifth step of the sequential evaluation process in §§ and of this chapter. When we decide whether you continue to be disabled, we use the rules in §§ and of this chapter.

Back to Top

Category of Impairments, Skin Disorders

Ichthyosis, with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

Bullous disease (for example, pemphigus, erythema multiforme bullosum, epidermolysis bullosa, bullous pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis), with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

.

Chronic infections of the skin or mucous membranes, with extensive fungating or extensive ulcerating skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

Dermatitis (for example, psoriasis, dyshidrosis, atopic dermatitis, exfoliative dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis), with extensive skin lesions that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

Hidradenitis suppurativa, with extensive skin lesions involving both axillae, both inguinal areas or the perineum that persist for at least 3 months despite continuing treatment as prescribed.

Genetic photosensitivity disorders, established as described in E.

A. Xeroderma pigmentosum. Consider the individual disabled from birth.

B. Other genetic photosensitivity disorders, with:

1. Extensive skin lesions that own lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months,

OR

2. Inability to function exterior of a highly protective environment for a continuous period of at least 12 months (see E2).

Burns, with extensive skin lesions that own lasted or can be expected to final for a continuous period of at least 12 months (see F).

Back to Top


How should I take Benadryl?

Use Benadryl exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Freezing or allergy medicine is generally taken only for a short time until your symptoms clear up.

Do not give this medication to a kid younger than 2 years ancient.

Always enquire a doctor before giving a cough or freezing medicine to a child. Death can happen from the misuse of cough and freezing medicines in extremely young children.

You should not use Benadryl to make a kid sleepy.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup.

What is skin allergy hives

If you do not own a dose-measuring device, enquire your pharmacist for one.

For motion sickness, take Benadryl 30 minutes before you will be in a situation that causes you motion sickness (such as a endless car ride, airplane or boat travel, amusement park rides, etc). Continue taking Benadryl with meals and at bedtime for the relax of the time you will be in a motion-sickness situation.

As a sleep aid, take Benadryl within 30 minutes before bedtime.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you own a fever with a headache, cough, or skin rash.

This medication can affect the results of allergy skin tests.

Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using Benadryl.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.


Important information

You should not use Benadryl to make a kid sleepy.

When taking Benadryl, use caution driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Diphenhydramine may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.

Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking Benadryl.

Do not give this medication to a kid younger than 2 years ancient.

Always enquire a doctor before giving a cough or freezing medicine to a child. Death can happen from the misuse of cough and freezing medicines in extremely young children.


Before taking this medicine

You should not use Benadryl if you are allergic to diphenhydramine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you own other medical conditions, especially:

  1. liver or kidney disease;

  2. heart disease, low blood pressure;

  3. cough with mucus, or cough caused by smoking, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis;

  4. asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or other breathing disorder;

  5. a colostomy or ileostomy;

  6. bladder obstruction or other urination problems;

  7. glaucoma;

  8. blockage in your digestive tract (stomach or intestines);

  9. a thyroid disorder; or

  10. if you take potassium (Cytra, Epiklor, K-Lyte, K-Phos, Kaon, Klor-Con, Polycitra, Urocit-K).

It is not known whether Benadryl will harm an unborn baby.

Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant.

Diphenhydramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Antihistamines may also slow breast milk production. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are breast-feeding.

Older adults may be more likely to own side effects from this medicine.


What is Benadryl?

Benadryl (diphenhydramine) is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Benadryl is used to treat sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, hives, skin rash, itching, and other freezing or allergy symptoms.

Benadryl is also used to treat motion sickness, to induce sleep, and to treat certain symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.


Benadryl

Generic Name:diphenhydramine (DYE fen HYE dra meen)

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Final updated on Dec 18,


RELATED VIDEO: