What is rhinitis allergy

You get allergy shots in your allergist’s office. You will stay in the office for 30 minutes after you get the shots, in case you own a severe reaction (anaphylaxis) to the injected allergens.

Redness and warmth at the shot site are common. But these go away after a short period of time.


Education

  1. Fellowship: Vanderbilt University, Allergy/Immunology
  2. Residency: University of South Carolina, Palmetto Health Richland Children’s Hospital
  3. Medical School: Medical College of Georgia
  4. College: University of Kansas, B.A., Psychology



Board Certifications

  1. American Board of Allergy and Immunology
  2. American Board of Pediatrics


Why It Is Done

Allergy shots can reduce your reaction to allergens, which can result in fewer or less severe symptoms.

They may also prevent children who own allergic rhinitis from getting asthma.footnote 1 Recommendations on when to get allergy shots vary, but in general you and your doctor may consider them when:

  1. You are allergic to only a few substances, and they are hard to avoid.
  2. Allergy symptoms are severe enough that the benefit from the shots outweighs the expense and the time spent getting the shots.
  3. You own another condition that is being affected by allergic rhinitis, such as asthma.
  4. Avoiding allergens and using medicine do not control symptoms, or you own to take medicine every the time to control symptoms.
  5. You desire a treatment for the cause of your allergy, rather than treatment for just the symptoms.
  6. Side effects of medicines are a problem.
  7. You desire to lower the chance that you will develop asthma.


How Well It Works

Allergy shots are effective in treating allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma.

The shots reduce symptoms in those allergic to pollens, animal dander, dust mites, mold, and cockroaches. Experts do not know how endless allergy shots work after you stop getting the shots.

What is rhinitis allergy

Some people may not own their allergies return. Others may own allergies return within a few years.footnote 1

Although you still need to avoid allergens, you may be capable to use less medicine or stop using medicines.


Biography

Dr. Nicole Chadha received her B.A. in psychology from the University of Kansas, then returned to her southern roots in Georgia to pursue her career in medicine. She graduated with her medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, GA. She subsequently completed her pediatric residency at Palmetto Health Richland Children’s Hospital associated with the University of South Carolina and fellowship in Allergy/Immunology at Vanderbilt University.
Upon completion of her fellowship, Dr.

Chadha remained on faculty at Vanderbilt as an Assistant Professor within the Division of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine. Dr. Chadha is board certified in Pediatrics and Allergy and Immunology.

What is rhinitis allergy

She is a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, and the American College of Asthma Allergy and Immunology.

Dr. Chadha chose to specialize in Allergy in specific because she enjoys studying the intricacies of the immune system and likes that the specialty allows her to treat both children and adults. The chronic nature of allergic disease affords her the chance to build lasting relationships with her patients. She finds grand reward in providing care and education that results in an improved quality of life for her patients. Dr. Chadha has numerous interests in a variety of allergic and immunologic conditions, including food allergy, asthma, urticaria, allergic rhinitis, primary immunodeficiency and eosinophilic esophagitis.

She has contributed to research on eosinophilic esophagitis in children and has presented her work both locally and nationally.

Dr. Chadha lives in Charlotte with her husband, Ashley, a pediatric pulmonologist, 2 young sons, and 2 dogs. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, reading, cooking, interior design, volunteering and taking part in community events.

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Treatment Overview

When you get immunotherapy in the form of allergy shots, your allergist or doctor injects little doses of substances that you are allergic to (allergens) under your skin.

This helps your body «get used to» the allergen, which can result in fewer or less severe symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

Your allergist will use an extract of grass, weed, or tree pollen; dust mites; molds; or animal dander for allergy shots. You must first own skin testing to discover out which allergen you are allergic to.

Your allergist injects under your skin a solution of salt water (saline) that contains a extremely little quantity of the allergen(s). At first, you get the shot once or twice a week. You gradually get more of the allergen in the shots.

After about 4 to 6 months of weekly shots, you are generally getting the best quantity of allergen in the shot.

This is called the maintenance dose. When you reach the maintenance dose, you get the same dose in shots every 2 to 4 weeks for the next 4 to 6 months.

The period between shots is gradually increased to about a month. And the dose generally stays the same each month. After 1 year of maintenance, your allergist will check to see if you own fewer or less severe symptoms. If your allergy symptoms own not changed, you will no longer get the shots. If your symptoms own improved, you may continue to get monthly shots for up to 3 to 5 years.footnote 1

Other ways to get this treatment are called cluster or rush immunotherapy, in which you reach the maintenance dose more quickly.


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