What is in a peanut that causes allergies

en españolAlergia a los frutos secos y a los cacahuetes

Oh, nuts! They certain can cause you trouble if you’re allergic to them — and a growing number of kids are these days.

So what helpful of nuts are we talking about? Peanuts, for one, though they aren’t truly a nut.

What is in a peanut that causes allergies

They’re a legume (say: LEH-gyoom), love peas and lentils. A person also could be allergic to nuts that grow on trees, such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, cashews, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, and pistachios.

When you ponder of allergies, you might picture lots of sneezing and runny noses. But unlike an allergy to spring flowers, a nut or peanut allergy can cause difficulty breathing and other extremely serious health problems. That’s why it’s very important for someone with a nut or peanut allergy to avoid eating nuts and peanuts, which can be tough because they’re in lots of foods.

What It Means to Be Allergic to Peanuts

When you’re allergic to peanuts, you’re actually allergic to the proteins found in peanuts.

Antibodies in your immune system float around waiting to jump into action if they come into contact with these proteins. This occurs when you eat a peanut—even a miniscule amount.

“When you own someone who’s allergic and ingests peanuts, the antibodies in the person’s immune system discover and grab onto this peanut and cause your body to release certain chemicals, the most significant of which is histamine,” says Edwin Kim, MD, director of the UNC Food Allergy Initiative.

Histamine can cause symptoms ranging from itching and hives to a severe, life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis.

Anaphylaxis must be treated with epinephrine, which comes in an injectable pen, often called an EpiPen, followed by an emergency medical evaluation.

What Will the Doctor Do?

If your doctor thinks you might own a nut or peanut allergy, he or she will probably send you to see a doctor who specializes in allergies. The (allergy specialist) will enquire you about past reactions and how endless it takes between eating the nut or peanut and getting the symptoms, such as hives.

The allergist may also enquire whether anyone else in your family has allergies or other allergy conditions, such as eczema or asthma. Researchers aren’t certain why some people own food allergies and others don’t, but they sometimes run in families.

The allergist may also desire to do a skin test.

This is a way of seeing how your body reacts to a extremely little quantity of the nut that is giving you trouble. The allergist will use a liquid extract of the nut that seems to be causing you symptoms.

During skin testing, a little scratch on your skin is made (it will be a quick pinch, but there are no needles!). That’s how just a little of the liquid nut gets into your skin. If you get a reddish, itchy, raised spot, it shows that you may be allergic to that food or substance.

Skin tests are the best test for food allergies, but if more information is needed, the doctor may also order a blood test.

At the lab, the blood will be mixed with some of the food or substance you may be allergic to and checked for antibodies.

It’s significant to remember that even though the doctor tests for food allergies by carefully exposing you to a extremely little quantity of the food, you should not attempt this at home! The only put for an allergy test is at the allergist’s office, where they are specially trained and could give you medicine correct away if you had a reaction.

How Is a Tree Nut or Peanut Allergy Treated?

There is no special medicine for nut or peanut allergies and numerous people don’t outgrow them.

The best treatment is to avoid the nut. That means not eating that nut, and also avoiding the nut when it’s mixed in foods. (Sometimes these foods don’t even taste nutty! Would you believe chili sometimes contains nuts to assist make it thicker?)

Staying safe means reading food labels and paying attention to what they tell about how the food was produced. Some foods don’t contain nuts, but are made in factories that make other items that do contain nuts.

The problem is the equipment can be used for both foods, causing "cross-contamination." That’s the same thing that happens in your own home if someone spreads peanut butter on a sandwich and dips that same knife into the jar of jelly.

After checking the ingredients list, glance on the label for phrases love these:

  1. "may contain tree nuts"
  2. "produced on shared equipment with tree nuts or peanuts"

People who are allergic to nuts also should avoid foods with these statements on the label.

Some of the highest-risk foods for people with peanut or tree nut allergy include:

  1. Asian and African foods
  2. candy
  3. cookies and baked goods
  4. ice cream
  5. sauces (nuts may be used to thicken dishes)

Talk to your allergist about how to stay safe in the school cafeteria. Also enquire about how you should handle other peanut encounters, love at restaurants or stadiums where people are opening peanut shells.

People with nut allergies generally won’t own a reaction if they breathe in little particles. That’s because the food generally has to be eaten to cause a reaction.

Smelling Peanuts Is Not the Same as Ingesting Them

While it is possible to breathe in a little bit of food protein, such as a peanut protein, that exposure is not enough to trigger a severe allergic reaction.

“The way I attempt to visualize it is it comes below to a threshold amount,” Dr. Kim says.

What is in a peanut that causes allergies

“In order to get enough of an exposure to trigger a large reaction, it really takes ingestion. It is extremely, extremely, extremely, extremely rare for someone to just inhale it and then actually own an all-out anaphylactic attack.”

And while this thought holds for both peanuts and tree nuts, it’s significant for people who are allergic to seafood to be aware: Reactions without ingestion do occasionally happen, Dr. Kim says. But the circumstances own to be just right; simply sitting next to someone eating shellfish, for example, won’t be a problem.

“There are reports where patients who are allergic to shellfish may be exposed to a steaming pot, perhaps at a clambake, and develop hives or asthma symptoms,” Dr.

Kim says. “This is not (from) being in the same room as someone eating shrimp, but from directly breathing in the steam as it’s being cooked or boiled.”

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Nut Allergy?

When someone with a peanut or tree nut allergy has something with nuts in it, the body releases chemicals love histamine (pronounced: HISS-tuh-meen).

This can cause symptoms such as:

  1. Bock SA, Atkins FM.

    The natural history of peanut allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1989;83:900-4

  2. diarrhea
  3. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  4. Liew WK, Williamson E, Tang ML. Anaphylaxis fatalities and admissions in Australia. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2009;123:434-42
  5. throat tightness
  6. vomiting
  7. Gupta RS, Springston EE, Warrier MR, et al. The prevalence, severity, and distribution of childhood food allergy in the United States. Pediatrics 2011;128:e9-17
  8. dizziness or fainting
  9. trouble breathing
  10. Loh W and Tang The Epidemiology of Food Allergy in the Global Context.

    Global Health, The Epidemiology of Allergy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018;15(9):2043

  11. wheezing
  12. Pumphrey RS, Gowland MH. Further fatal allergic reactions to food in the United Kingdom, 1999-2006. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2007;119:1018-9
  13. Bunyavanich S, Rifas-Shiman SL, Platts-Mills TA, et al. Peanut allergy prevalence among school-age children in a US cohort not selected for any disease. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014 Sep; 134(3): 753–755
  14. anxiety or a feeling something bad is happening
  15. hoarseness
  16. stomachache
  17. hives
  18. Avery NJ, King RM, Knight S, et al.

    Assessment of quality of life in children with peanut allergy. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003 Oct;14(5):378-82

  19. a drop in blood pressure
  20. swelling
  21. Bock SA, Munoz-Furlong A, Sampson HA. Further fatalities caused by anaphylactic reactions to food, 2001-2006. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2007;119:1016-8
  22. WAO White Book on Allergy 2013 Update – http://www.worldallergy.org/wao-white-book-on-allergy
  23. sneezing
  24. coughing
  25. Kristin Sokol, Marjohn Rasooly, Caeden Dempsey, Sheryce Lassiter, Wenjuan Gu, Keith Lumbard, Pamela A Frischmeyer‐Guerrerio. Prevalence and Diagnosis of Sesame Allergy in Children with IgE‐Mediated Food Allergy.

    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2019; DOI: 10.1111/pai.13143

Reactions to foods, love peanuts and tree nuts, can be diverse. It every depends on the person — and sometimes the same person can react differently at diverse times.

In the most serious cases, a nut or peanut allergy can cause anaphylaxis (say: an-uh-fuh-LAK-sis). Anaphylaxis is a sudden, life-threatening allergic reaction. A person’s blood pressure can drop, breathing tubes can narrow, and the tongue can swell.

People at risk for this helpful of a reaction own to be extremely careful and need a plan for handling emergencies, when they might need to use special medicine to stop these symptoms from getting worse.

Have an Emergency Plan

If you own a nut or peanut allergy, you and a parent should create a plan for how to handle a reaction, just in case.

That way your teachers, the school nurse, your basketball coach, your friends — everyone will know what a reaction looks love and how to respond.

To immediately treat anaphylaxis, doctors recommend that people with a nut or peanut allergy hold a shot of epinephrine (say: eh-puh-NEH-frin) with them. This helpful of epinephrine injection comes in an easy-to-carry container. You and your parent can work out whether you carry this or someone at school keeps it on hand for you. You’ll also need to identify a person who will give you the shot.

You might desire to own antihistamine medicine on hand too for mild reactions.

If anaphylaxis is happening, this medicine is never a substitute for epinephrine. After getting an epinephrine shot, you need to go to the hospital or other medical facility, where they will hold an eye on you for at least 4 hours and make certain the reaction is under control and does not come back.

What Else Should I Know?

If you discover out you own a nut or peanut allergy, don’t be bashful about it. It’s significant to tell your friends, family, coaches, and teachers at school. The more people who know, the better off you are because they can assist you stay away from the nut that causes you problems.

Telling the server in a restaurant is also really significant because he or she can steer you away from dishes that contain nuts.

Likewise, a coach or teacher would be capable to select snacks for the group that don’t contain nuts.

It’s grand to own people love your parents, who can assist you avoid nuts, but you’ll also desire to start learning how to avoid them on your own.

A UNC allergist addresses the risk of airborne peanut allergies.

Your carry-on bag is safely stowed overhead, your little one is buckled in and playing with her favorite toy, and you’re ready to dive into the thriller you brought to read on your flight when you smell it.

Peanuts. You start to panic.

What is in a peanut that causes allergies

Her EpiPen is somewhere in the carry-on above, but the “fasten seat belt” sign is glaring at you. What should you do?

Take a deep breath and relax. Even if you are allergic to peanuts, touching, smelling or inhaling particles from peanuts cannot cause an allergic reaction—at least not the serious, life-threatening type that everyone with a peanut allergy fears. You are not in harm unless you eat them.

What Happens With a Tree Nut or Peanut Allergy?

Your immune system normally fights infections. But when someone has a nut allergy, it overreacts to proteins in the nut. If the person eats something that contains the nut, the body thinks these proteins are harmful invaders and responds by working extremely hard to fight off the invader.

This causes an allergic reaction.

When Exposure to Peanuts Can Cause a Physical Reaction

While just smelling peanuts won’t cause a severe reaction, if you’re allergic to peanuts, the smell can trigger a response in your body because it senses danger.

“Peanuts own a extremely potent smell. The smell may be enough to trigger some of the anxiety, concerns and fear that rightfully come because you anticipate a reaction,” Dr. Kim says. “It’s a survival instinct. Your body knows there is something around that it should not be eating.”

Dr. Kim says that if you are allergic to peanuts, you can experience nausea or just feel a little off if you smell them.

“And if the person who sat in an airplane seat before you happened to eat peanuts and was not extremely clean, you could potentially touch it in a chair and own a little bit of a rash or irritation” on the skin, he says.

So whether it’s on a plane or at the lunchroom table, wipe below the area if you smell peanuts or are concerned about residue. Also, if you own a kid who is allergic to peanuts, make certain you teach him or her early not to share food with friends.

“If they’re too young to know not to share foods, then that might be the one time where an actual separated table (for children with peanut allergies) could make sense,” Dr.

Kim says. “But as they get older and you feel love they own learned this and can control their instincts, there’s no reason they can’t sit alongside their friends.”


Talk to your or your child’s doctor if you’re concerned about food allergies. If you need a doctor, discover one near you.

Edwin Kim, MD, MS, is an allergist at the UNC Allergy and Immunology Clinic in Chapel Hill and an assistant professor of allergy and immunology at the UNC School of Medicine.

He is also the director of the UNC Food Allergy Initiative.

Colonization with the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium was significantly and independently associated with food allergy in young children with eczema enrolled in a pivotal peanut allergy prevention study.

S.aureus is a marker for severe eczema, and early eczema is a widely recognized risk factor for developing food allergies in young children.

But the findings from the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study cohort show that even after controlling for eczema severity, skin S.

aureus positivity was associated with an increased risk for developing allergies to peanuts, eggs, and cow’s milk.

S. aureus colonization was also associated with persistent egg allergy until at least age 5 or 6 years in the LEAP cohort analysis in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The lead researcher, Olympia Tsilochristou, MD, of Kings College London, said in a press statement that the findings could assist explain why young children with eczema own a extremely high risk for developing food allergies. While the exact mechanisms linking the two are not known, «our results propose that the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus could be an significant factor contributing to this outcome,» she said.

The findings also propose that S.

aureus colonization may inhibit peanut tolerance among at-risk infants when peanuts are introduced extremely early in life.

Among the nine participants in the peanut-consumption arm of the study (i.e., no peanut allergy at baseline) who had confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, every but one were colonized with S. aureus at one or more LEAP study visits.

«The fact that S. aureus was associated with greater risk of peanut allergy among peanut consumers but not peanut avoiders further suggests that peanut consumption was less effective in the prevention of peanut allergy among participants with S. aureus compared with those with no S.

aureus,» the researchers wrote.

The LEAP study enrolled infants ages 4-11 months with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both. The babies were randomized to therapeutic peanut consumption or peanut avoidance, and every had eczema clinical evaluation and culture of skin and nasal swabs at baseline.

The follow-up LEAP-On study assessed the children at age 72 months, after 12 months of peanut avoidance in both groups.

Skin and nasal swabs were obtained at baseline and at age 12, 30, and 60 months. A entire of 48.8% of the participants had some form of S.

aureus colonization (32.2% skin and 32.3% nasal) on at least one LEAP study visit, with most having just one positive test result. The greatest rates of colonization were recorded at 4-11 months of age.

S. aureus colonization was significantly associated with eczema severity, along with hen’s egg white and peanut specific immunoglobulin (sIg)E production at any LEAP visit. But even after controlling for eczema severity, hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE levels at each LEAP and LEAP-On visit were significantly associated with skin S.

aureus positivity, the team noted.

«This relationship was even stronger when we looked into high-level hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE production,» the researchers wrote. «Similar findings were noted for cow’s milk, where high-level sIgE production to milk at 30, 60, and 72 months of age was related to any skin S. aureus colonization. Together, these data propose that S. aureus is associated with hen’s egg, peanut, and cow’s milk allergy.»

In the LEAP study, extremely early peanut consumption was found to reduce the risk of peanut allergy at 60 months in infants at high risk for developing the allergy, but infants in the consumption arm of the study with S.

aureus colonization were approximately seven and four times more likely to own confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, the team said.

Study strengths, Tsilochristou and co-authors noted, included the rigorous design; a limitation was the reliance on bacteriological culture to identify S.

What is in a peanut that causes allergies

aureus colonization rather than using DNA-based testing.

«S. aureus has been implicated in the development and severity of atopic diseases, namely eczema, allergic rhinitis, and asthma; our findings extend these observations to the development of food allergy independent of eczema severity,» the investigators concluded.

«The role of S. aureus as a potential environmental factor should be considered in future interventions aimed at inducing and maintaining tolerance to food allergens in eczematous infants. Further prospective longitudinal studies measuring S. aureus with more advanced techniques and interventional studies eradicating S.

aureus in early infancy will assist elucidate its role in the development of eczema or food allergy,» the team wrote.

Understanding Food Allergy


Food allergy is a rapidly growing global health problem1. While rates of food allergy own increased most rapidly in developed countries, recent studies propose that similar increases are occurring in developing regions alongside rapid economic growth2.

In people with food allergy, the immune system incorrectly recognizes the food allergen as potentially harmful, and produces IgE antibodies directed against the allergen. These IgE antibodies bind to receptors on the surface of specialized allergy effector cells, known as ‘mast cells’, which are present in the tissues of the skin, airways and intestine.

When the food is eaten, food allergens enter the body and bind to the food-specific IgE antibodies on mast cells, causing the mast cells to release a variety of immune factors that cause the symptoms of an allergic reaction. Symptoms of an allergic reaction can range from mild itching and redness of the skin, hives, and gastrointestinal upset to life-threatening anaphylaxis, with noisy or difficulty breathing and drop in blood pressure.

The steps leading to an allergic reaction

The reasons why the immune system in people with food allergy incorrectly recognizes food allergen(s) as harmful are not fully understood.

Studies propose that the circumstances in which the immune system first encounters the food allergen(s) might be significant in determining whether there is a natural tolerance response or the development of food allergy. For example, if the first encounter between the immune system and food allergen(s) takes put in the healthy intestine, such as when a healthy person eats a food for the first time, specialized tolerance promoting cells that are abundant in the intestines instruct the immune system to develop a tolerance response to the food allergen(s). If on the other hand, the immune system first encounters food allergen(s) entering the body through inflamed skin, such as through skin that is affected by eczema, the incorrect signal is delivered to the immune system resulting in an allergic response rather than a tolerance response.

There is currently no effective long-term treatment for food allergy.

Patient management focuses on avoiding the food concerned, early initiation of appropriate emergency treatment of allergic reactions, particularly anaphylaxis, and in selected patients, provision of an adrenaline autoinjector. The constant vigilance required to avoid food allergens and the ever-present possibility of a serious allergic reaction lead to a significantly reduced quality of life.

Peanut allergy

It is estimated that around 1 in every 50 people in the US is allergic to peanut3, and every year about half suffer an allergic reaction due to accidental ingestion of peanut that is impossible to predict or prevent4.

Fortunately, fatalities are rare, however accidental peanut exposure and the possibility of a potentially life-threatening reaction remain an ever-present cause of anxiety.

Peanut allergy is generally lifelong. It is the most common cause of life-threatening reactions (anaphylaxis)5 and the most common cause of death from food-induced anaphylaxis6-8. Children with peanut allergy report a significantly reduced quality of life worse than that of children with diabetes9.

  • Gupta RS, Springston EE, Warrier MR, et al.

    The prevalence, severity, and distribution of childhood food allergy in the United States. Pediatrics 2011;128:e9-17

  • Bock SA, Munoz-Furlong A, Sampson HA. Further fatalities caused by anaphylactic reactions to food, 2001-2006. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2007;119:1016-8
  • Pumphrey RS, Gowland MH. Further fatal allergic reactions to food in the United Kingdom, 1999-2006. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2007;119:1018-9
  • WAO White Book on Allergy 2013 Update – http://www.worldallergy.org/wao-white-book-on-allergy
  • Loh W and Tang The Epidemiology of Food Allergy in the Global Context.

    Global Health, The Epidemiology of Allergy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018;15(9):2043

  • Bock SA, Atkins FM. The natural history of peanut allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1989;83:900-4
  • Liew WK, Williamson E, Tang ML. Anaphylaxis fatalities and admissions in Australia. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2009;123:434-42
  • Bunyavanich S, Rifas-Shiman SL, Platts-Mills TA, et al. Peanut allergy prevalence among school-age children in a US cohort not selected for any disease. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014 Sep; 134(3): 753–755
  • Avery NJ, King RM, Knight S, et al.

    Assessment of quality of life in children with peanut allergy. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2003 Oct;14(5):378-82

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health own found that sesame allergy is common among children with other food allergies, occurring in an estimated 17% of this population. In addition, the scientists own found that sesame antibody testing — whose utility has been controversial — accurately predicts whether a kid with food allergy is allergic to sesame. The research was published on Oct.

28 in the journal Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

«It has been a challenge for clinicians and parents to determine if a kid is truly allergic to sesame,» said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH. «Given how frequently sesame allergy occurs among children who are allergic to other foods, it is significant to use caution to the extent possible when exposing these children to sesame.»

Sesame is among the 10 most common childhood food allergies.

Only an estimated 20% to 30% of children with sesame allergy outgrow it. Severe reactions to sesame are common among sesame-allergic children. About 1.1 million people in the United States, or an estimated 0.23% of the U.S. population, own sesame allergy, according to a recently published study funded by NIAID. These factors underscore the need to optimize recognition and diagnosis of this allergy. The Food and Drug istration is currently considering whether to include sesame in the list of allergens that must be disclosed on food labels.

Standard allergy tests — the skin-prick test and the allergen-specific antibody test — own been inconsistent in predicting an allergic reaction to sesame.

Numerous studies evaluating the utility of these tests for sesame allergy own included only children suspected to own sesame allergy. Taking a diverse approach, scientists led by Pamela A. Frischmeyer-Guerrerio, M.D., Ph.D., deputy chief of the NIAID Laboratory of Allergic Diseases and chief of its Food Allergy Research Unit, evaluated the sesame antibody test in a group of 119 children with food allergy whose sesame-allergic status was unknown.

The researchers offered children in the study an oral food challenge — the gold standard for diagnosing food allergy — which involved ingesting gradually increasing amounts of sesame under medical supervision and seeing if an allergic reaction occurred.

Children who recently had had an allergic reaction to sesame or were known to tolerate concentrated sesame, such as tahini, in their diet were not offered an oral food challenge.

The scientists found that 15 (13%) of the 119 children were sesame-allergic, 73 (61%) were sesame-tolerant, and sesame-allergic status could not be sure for 31 (26%) children, mainly because they declined the oral food challenge. Among the 88 children whose sesame-allergic status was definitive, 17% had sesame allergy.

The scientists measured the quantity of an antibody called sesame-specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) in the blood of these 88 children.

With this data and information on the children’s sesame-allergic status, the researchers developed a mathematical model for predicting the probability that a kid with food allergy is allergic to sesame.

What is in a peanut that causes allergies

According to the model, children with more than 29.4 kilo international units of sIgE per liter of serum own a greater than 50% chance of being allergic to sesame. This model will need to be validated by additional studies, however, before it can be used in clinical practice.


Story Source:

Materials provided by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

Investigators at the National Institutes of Health own found that sesame allergy is common among children with other food allergies, occurring in an estimated 17% of this population.

In addition, the scientists own found that sesame antibody testing — whose utility has been controversial — accurately predicts whether a kid with food allergy is allergic to sesame. The research was published on Oct. 28 in the journal Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

«It has been a challenge for clinicians and parents to determine if a kid is truly allergic to sesame,» said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH. «Given how frequently sesame allergy occurs among children who are allergic to other foods, it is significant to use caution to the extent possible when exposing these children to sesame.»

Sesame is among the 10 most common childhood food allergies.

Only an estimated 20% to 30% of children with sesame allergy outgrow it. Severe reactions to sesame are common among sesame-allergic children. About 1.1 million people in the United States, or an estimated 0.23% of the U.S. population, own sesame allergy, according to a recently published study funded by NIAID. These factors underscore the need to optimize recognition and diagnosis of this allergy. The Food and Drug istration is currently considering whether to include sesame in the list of allergens that must be disclosed on food labels.

Standard allergy tests — the skin-prick test and the allergen-specific antibody test — own been inconsistent in predicting an allergic reaction to sesame.

Numerous studies evaluating the utility of these tests for sesame allergy own included only children suspected to own sesame allergy. Taking a diverse approach, scientists led by Pamela A. Frischmeyer-Guerrerio, M.D., Ph.D., deputy chief of the NIAID Laboratory of Allergic Diseases and chief of its Food Allergy Research Unit, evaluated the sesame antibody test in a group of 119 children with food allergy whose sesame-allergic status was unknown.

The researchers offered children in the study an oral food challenge — the gold standard for diagnosing food allergy — which involved ingesting gradually increasing amounts of sesame under medical supervision and seeing if an allergic reaction occurred.

Children who recently had had an allergic reaction to sesame or were known to tolerate concentrated sesame, such as tahini, in their diet were not offered an oral food challenge.

The scientists found that 15 (13%) of the 119 children were sesame-allergic, 73 (61%) were sesame-tolerant, and sesame-allergic status could not be sure for 31 (26%) children, mainly because they declined the oral food challenge. Among the 88 children whose sesame-allergic status was definitive, 17% had sesame allergy.

The scientists measured the quantity of an antibody called sesame-specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) in the blood of these 88 children. With this data and information on the children’s sesame-allergic status, the researchers developed a mathematical model for predicting the probability that a kid with food allergy is allergic to sesame.

According to the model, children with more than 29.4 kilo international units of sIgE per liter of serum own a greater than 50% chance of being allergic to sesame. This model will need to be validated by additional studies, however, before it can be used in clinical practice.


Story Source:

Materials provided by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  • Kristin Sokol, Marjohn Rasooly, Caeden Dempsey, Sheryce Lassiter, Wenjuan Gu, Keith Lumbard, Pamela A Frischmeyer‐Guerrerio. Prevalence and Diagnosis of Sesame Allergy in Children with IgE‐Mediated Food Allergy.

    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2019; DOI: 10.1111/pai.13143


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NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.» ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 November 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm>.

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

What is in a peanut that causes allergies

(2019, November 4). Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.» ScienceDaily.

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).


make a difference: sponsored opportunity

Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.» ScienceDaily.

What is in a peanut that causes allergies

ScienceDaily, 4 November 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm>.

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2019, November 4). Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children own sesame allergy: Scientists discover sesame antibody testing predicts sesame allergy in food-allergic children.» ScienceDaily.

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191104112932.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).


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