What is atopic skin allergy

<p>This subsection of the ‘Entry information’ section provides a mnemonic identifier for a UniProtKB entry, but it is not a stable identifier. Each reviewed entry is assigned a unique entry name upon integration into UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot.<p><a href=’/help/entry_name’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Entry namei O93972_MALSM
<p>This subsection of the ‘Entry information’ section provides one or more accession number(s). These are stable identifiers and should be used to cite UniProtKB entries.

Upon integration into UniProtKB, each entry is assigned a unique accession number, which is called ‘Primary (citable) accession number’.<p><a href=’/help/accession_numbers’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Accessioni

O93972Primary (citable) accession number: O93972
<p>This subsection of the ‘Entry information’ section shows the date of integration of the entry into UniProtKB, the date of the final sequence update and the date of the final annotation modification (‘Last modified’). The version number for both the entry and the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/canonical_and_isoforms»>canonical sequence</a> are also displayed.<p><a href=’/help/entry_history’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Entry historyi Integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL: May 1, 1999
Last sequence update: May 1, 2000
Last modified: December 11, 2019
This is version 31 of the entry and version 2 of the sequence.

What is atopic skin allergy

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<p>This subsection of the ‘Entry information’ section indicates whether the entry has been manually annotated and reviewed by UniProtKB curators or not, in other words, if the entry belongs to the Swiss-Prot section of UniProtKB (<strong>reviewed</strong>) or to the computer-annotated TrEMBL section (<strong>unreviewed</strong>).<p><a href=’/help/entry_status’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Entry statusi Unreviewed (UniProtKB/TrEMBL)


<p>This section provides links to proteins that are similar to the protein sequence(s) described in this entry at diverse levels of sequence identity thresholds (100%, 90% and 50%) based on their membership in UniProt Reference Clusters (<a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/uniref»>UniRef</a>).<p><a href=’/help/similar_proteins_section’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Similar proteinsi

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Most Common Allergies

Asthma

What is asthma?
Asthma is a condition that causes swelling and inflammation inside the airways of the lungs.

This inflammation and swelling is there to a greater or lesser degree every the time in people with asthma.The more inflammation there is the harder it becomes to breathe. People with asthma also own over-sensitive airways, so their airways react to triggers that do not affect other people. When sufferers come into contact with something that irritates their airways (a trigger), it can cause their airways to narrow.

Read more…

Drug Allergy

Prescription drugs own been through a rigorous process of testing to ensure safety, despite this, a minority of individuals will develop side-effects. Side- effects are termed “adverse drug reactions” by doctors and although the majority of adverse drug reactions are relatively minor and may even permit continuation with the drug, in some cases more severe symptoms can occur.Read more…

Allergy in Children

The bulk of allergic disease occurs in childhood, with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema and food allergy comprising a significant percentage of the workload of doctors dealing with children in primary care and hospital paediatric departments. In a recent large UK survey, 20% of children were reported to own had asthma in the previous year, 18% had allergic rhino conjunctivitis (hay fever) and 16% had eczema.

This represents a massive increase in prevalence compared with similar studies in the 1970 s where prevalence rates were 3 fold lower. Of these children 47% had at least two co-existing conditions e.g. asthma and eczema. Read more…

Food Allergy and Food Intolerance

If someone reacts to a food, they may own a Food Hypersensitivity (FHS). FHS reactions involving the immune system are known as food allergy (FA), every other reactions are classified as food intolerances (FI). Read more…

Atopic Eczema (Dermatitis)

Eczema is a pattern of itchy skin rash consisting of tiny pink bumps that may join together producing ill-defined pink or red patches. There are numerous types of eczema – some own known causes. Dermatitis is the term used for eczema reactions that are caused by external agents/factors. Atopic eczema is often referred to as “infantile” of childhood eczema because that is when it generally develops. Atopic eczema is generally associated with allergies (hayfever or asthma) in either the affected individuals or in their shut relatives.

What is atopic skin allergy

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Rhinitis

Rhinitis means inflammation of the lining of the nose Rhinitis is defined clinically as symptoms of runny nose itching, sneezing and nasal blockage (congestion).. Common causes of rhinitis are allergies which may be seasonal (‘hayfever’) or happen all-year-round (examples include allergy to home dust mite, cats, dogs and moulds).Infections which may be acute or chronic represent another common cause. Rhinitis (whether due to allergic or other causes) is a risk factor for the development of asthma.

Rhinitis is also implicated in otitis media with effusion and in sinusitis which should rightly be termed rhinosinusitis since sinus inflammation almost always involves the nasal passages as well. Read more…

Skin Allergy

The allergic process can affect the skin producing 2 main types of rashes namely urticaria (hives, nettlerash, welts) or eczema (see atopic dermatitis section).

Urticaria is a red itchy bumpy rash that is often short-lived and can appear in various shapes and sizes anywhere on the body.It is extremely common affecting 1 in 5 of the population at sometime in their lives.In some people urticaria is accompanied by large dramatic swellings commonly affecting lips, eyelids, tongue and hand called angioedema.

What is atopic skin allergy

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Atopic dermatitis, a common inflammatory skin condition also known as allergic eczema, affects almost 20 percent of children, 30 percent of whom also own food allergies. Scientists own now found that children with both atopic dermatitis and food allergy own structural and molecular differences in the top layers of healthy-looking skin near the eczema lesions, whereas children with atopic dermatitis alone do not. Defining these differences may assist identify children at elevated risk for developing food allergies, according to research published online today in Science Translational Medicine. The research was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

«Children and families affected by food allergies must constantly guard against an accidental exposure to foods that could cause life-threatening allergic reactions,» said NIAID Director Anthony S.

Fauci, M.D. «Eczema is a risk factor for developing food allergies, and thus early intervention to protect the skin may be one key to preventing food allergy.»

Children with atopic dermatitis develop patches of dry, itchy, scaly skin caused by allergic inflammation. Atopic dermatitis symptoms range from minor itchiness to extreme discomfort that can disrupt a child’s sleep and can lead to recurrent infections in scratched, broken skin.

The study, led by Donald Y.M.

What is atopic skin allergy

Leung, M.D., Ph.D., of National Jewish Health in Denver, examined the top layers of the skin, known as the stratum corneum, in areas with eczema lesions and in adjacent normal-looking skin. The study enrolled 62 children aged 4 to 17 who either had atopic dermatitis and peanut allergy, atopic dermatitis and no evidence of any food allergy, or neither condition. Investigators collected skin samples by applying and removing little, sterile strips of tape to the same area of skin. With each removal, a microscopic sublayer of the first layer of skin tissue was collected and preserved for analysis.

This technique allowed researchers to determine the skin’s composition of cells, proteins and fats, as well as its microbial communities, gene expression within skin cells and water loss through the skin barrier.

Researchers found that the skin rash of children with both atopic dermatitis and food allergy was indistinguishable from the skin rash of children with atopic dermatitis alone.

What is atopic skin allergy

However, they found significant differences in the structure and molecular composition of the top layer of non-lesional, healthy-appearing skin between children with atopic dermatitis and food allergy compared with children with atopic dermatitis alone. Non-lesional skin from children with atopic dermatitis and food allergy was more prone to water loss, had an abundance of the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, and had gene expression typical of an immature skin barrier. These abnormalities also were seen in skin with athletic atopic dermatitis lesions, suggesting that skin abnormalities extend beyond the visible lesions in children with atopic dermatitis and food allergy but not in those with atopic dermatitis alone.

«Our team sought to understand how healthy-looking skin might be diverse in children who develop both atopic dermatitis and food allergy compared to children with atopic dermatitis alone,» said Dr.

Leung. «Interestingly, we found those differences not within the skin rash but in samples of seemingly unaffected skin inches away. These insights may assist us not only better understand atopic dermatitis, but also identify children most at risk for developing food allergies before they develop overt skin rash and, eventually, fine tune prevention strategies so fewer children are affected.»

Allergy experts consider atopic dermatitis to be an early step in the so-called «atopic march,» a common clinical progression found in some children in which atopic dermatitis progresses to food allergies and, sometimes, to respiratory allergies and allergic asthma.

Numerous immunologists hypothesize that food allergens may reach immune cells more easily through a dysfunctional skin barrier affected by atopic dermatitis, thereby setting off biological processes that result in food allergies.


Story Source:

Materials provided by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  • Donald Y. M. Leung, Agustin Calatroni, Livia S. Zaramela, Petra K. LeBeau, Nathan Dyjack, Kanwaljit Brar, Gloria David, Keli Johnson, Susan Leung, Marco Ramirez-Gama, Bo Liang, Cydney Rios, Michael T.

    What is atopic skin allergy

    Montgomery, Brittany N. Richers, Clifton F. Hall, Kathryn A. Norquest, John Jung, Irina Bronova, Simion Kreimer, C.

    What is atopic skin allergy

    Conover Talbot, Debra Crumrine, Robert N. Cole, Peter Elias, Karsten Zengler, Max A. Seibold, Evgeny Berdyshev, Elena Goleva. The nonlesional skin surface distinguishes atopic dermatitis with food allergy as a unique endotype. Science Translational Medicine, 2019; 11 (480): eaav2685 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aav2685


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Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy: Children with both conditions own abnormal skin near eczema lesions, research finds.» ScienceDaily.

ScienceDaily, 20 February 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220145041.htm>.

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2019, February 20). Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy: Children with both conditions own abnormal skin near eczema lesions, research finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220145041.htm

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. «Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy: Children with both conditions own abnormal skin near eczema lesions, research finds.» ScienceDaily.

What is atopic skin allergy

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220145041.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).

Incidences are on the increase, particularly in the Western world, with a two- to three-fold increase in reported cases than there were 30 years ago. There is no conclusive cause known for Atopic Dermatitis but there is evidence of links with both asthma and hay fever.

The disease mainly affects children – 10-20% of children globally are affected – while 2-5% of adults own the condition.

In adults the rash tends to affect the neck and décolleté, the inside of elbows, back of knees, hands and feet, as well as the face and scalp.

Symptoms and affected areas are slightly diverse when it comes to children and babies.

People with Atopic Dermatitis often experience additional problems – such as lack of sleep, stress, discrimination and a lack of self-confidence. As well as maintaining a excellent skin care routine, there are certain lifestyle changes that can alleviate the symptoms – such as wearing cotton clothing, keeping temperatures low to avoid sweating and avoiding trigger foods.

Allergen Details:

Allergen name: Hom s 3
Lineage: Source: Animalia Chordata
Order: Primates
Species: Homo sapiens(Human autoallergen)
Biochemical name: BCL7B protein
MW(SDS-PAGE): 22-23 kDa
Allergenicity: Sera from 2 patients tested, suffering from atopic dermatitis, showed IgE binding to rHom s 3 on nitocellulose filter.

In 2 out of 5 patients tested rHom s 3 induced immediate type skin reactions.

Allergenicity reference: 9806765 
Route of allergen exposure: Unknown
Date Created: 14-08-2003
Last Updated: 2019-08-27 22:43:05
Submitter Info:
Name:
Institution:
City:
Email:
Submission Date:

Table of IsoAllergens Click +/- for additional information

Isoallergen and variants GenBank Nucleotide GenBank Protein UniProt PDB
Hom s 3.0101 X89985 CAA62012 Q13845

Select a section on the left to see content.


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Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

«Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy: Children with both conditions own abnormal skin near eczema lesions, research finds.» ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 February 2019. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220145041.htm>.

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2019, February 20). Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy: Children with both conditions own abnormal skin near eczema lesions, research finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220145041.htm

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

«Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy: Children with both conditions own abnormal skin near eczema lesions, research finds.» ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220145041.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).

Incidences are on the increase, particularly in the Western world, with a two- to three-fold increase in reported cases than there were 30 years ago. There is no conclusive cause known for Atopic Dermatitis but there is evidence of links with both asthma and hay fever.

The disease mainly affects children – 10-20% of children globally are affected – while 2-5% of adults own the condition.

In adults the rash tends to affect the neck and décolleté, the inside of elbows, back of knees, hands and feet, as well as the face and scalp.

Symptoms and affected areas are slightly diverse when it comes to children and babies.

People with Atopic Dermatitis often experience additional problems – such as lack of sleep, stress, discrimination and a lack of self-confidence. As well as maintaining a excellent skin care routine, there are certain lifestyle changes that can alleviate the symptoms – such as wearing cotton clothing, keeping temperatures low to avoid sweating and avoiding trigger foods.

Allergen Details:

Allergen name: Hom s 3
Lineage: Source: Animalia Chordata
Order: Primates
Species: Homo sapiens(Human autoallergen)
Biochemical name: BCL7B protein
MW(SDS-PAGE): 22-23 kDa
Allergenicity: Sera from 2 patients tested, suffering from atopic dermatitis, showed IgE binding to rHom s 3 on nitocellulose filter.

In 2 out of 5 patients tested rHom s 3 induced immediate type skin reactions.

Allergenicity reference: 9806765 
Route of allergen exposure: Unknown
Date Created: 14-08-2003
Last Updated: 2019-08-27 22:43:05
Submitter Info:
Name:
Institution:
City:
Email:
Submission Date:

Table of IsoAllergens Click +/- for additional information

Isoallergen and variants GenBank Nucleotide GenBank Protein UniProt PDB
Hom s 3.0101 X89985 CAA62012 Q13845

Select a section on the left to see content.


<p>This section displays by default the canonical protein sequence and upon request every isoforms described in the entry.

It also includes information pertinent to the sequence(s), including <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/sequence_length»>length</a> and <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/sequences»>molecular weight</a>. The information is filed in diverse subsections. The current subsections and their content are listed below:<p><a href=’/help/sequences_section’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Sequencei

<p>This subsection of the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/sequences_section»>Sequence</a> section indicates if the <a href=»http://www.uniprot.org/help/canonical_and_isoforms»>canonical sequence</a> displayed by default in the entry is finish or not.<p><a href=’/help/sequence_status’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Sequence statusi: Complete.

Sequence databases

O93972-1 [UniParc]FASTAAdd to basketAdded to basket« Hide 10 20 30 40 50
MVALKFAAVL SVVAAAVMAA PSSMDRRASP DNQVWVTSAS DYCLILPRHR
60 70 80 90 100
ESIGDSESPG RMRSFCSKPY DSSQGQINPG FWKEVHFKKT KNYVQLTGCI
110 120 130 140 150
NPRVQSTLLS HDDGGQYDSN GNGGVGNPEG SVCLGYSSYV ELVEPSDGKA
160 170
CIRCCVNDKY CDVGHDEDGC EAVIPGQYC
Show »

179

19,326

May 1, 2000 — v2

20205B134D662C4E

GO


<p>This section is used to point to information related to entries and found in data collections other than UniProtKB.<p><a href=’/help/cross_references_section’ target=’_top’>More…</a></p>Cross-referencesi

Protein family/group databases

Allergomei 3372 Mala s 8.0101
474 Mala s 8

Family and domain databases

ProtoNet; Automatic hierarchical classification of proteins

More…ProtoNeti

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MobiDB: a database of protein disorder and mobility annotations

More…MobiDBi

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