What is an allergy panel blood test

This longitudinal study was part of a larger study examining physiological responses during the Three Cranes Challenge (a 3-day 95 km trail run) in Karkloof, KwaZulu-Natal on 25 — 27 February 2011. Local institutional ethical approval was obtained, and a sample of 22 volunteers signed informed consent forms.

After routine baseline testing on the afternoon before the race, venous blood samples were collected at a entire of 8 time points, before and after each day’s stage (S1pre, S1post, S2pre, S2post, S3pre and S3post), 24 hours post-race (24PR) and 72 hours post-race (72PR).

RTS data were collected over a 31-day period, from 14 days prior to the race until the 14th day after the race. Of the 22 subjects, 16 completed the race and complied with every the study requirements. Two subjects were excluded as a result of failure to finish the race, and a further 4 did not finish post-race testing.

Athletes were asked to record the daily incidence and severity of RTS before, during and after the race using a graded 1 — 3-point scoring system. Symptoms monitored included cough, runny nose, sneezing, blocked nose, sore throat, headache, fever, tight chest and itchy eyes. A entire RTS index score was sure using the sum of severity scores and the length of time that the symptom(s) persisted.

To determine which subjects qualified for post-exercise RTS, any subject presenting with a single RTS lasting <2 days or any nonspecific symptom (e.g.

headache, itchy eyes) not accompanied by RTS lasting >1 day, was excluded. A peak post-stage or post-race serum IgE (sIgE) concentration under the clinically significant range (100 IU/ml) excluded the possibility of the RTS being of allergic origin.

Full blood counts, pre-race Phadiatop status and sIgE concentrations were sure by Ampath Laboratories, Howick, KwaZulu-Natal, using an automated UniCAP system. In the Phadiatop assay, concentrations >0.35 IU/ml represented a positive response, irrespective of range.14

Exercise-induced changes in plasma volume (PV) over this 3-day event were sure from pre- and post-exercise haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations.15 Post-exercise sIgE levels and concentration-dependent leucocyte counts were adjusted for percentage exercise-induced change in PV.

After confirmation of the absence of normality of the data, they were logarithmically transformed.

A generalised linear model was applied to the median (range) sIgE and differential leucocyte concentration data from multiple subjects over multiple time points and between Phadiatop-positive and negative groups. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the RTS data pre- and post-race and between Phadiatop-positive and negative groups. Data are presented as the median (interquartile range (IQR)) in box-and-whisker plots in Figs 1 and 2. Significance was set at p=0.05.



What is an allergy blood test?

Allergies are a common and chronic condition that involves the body’s immune system.

Normally, your immune system works to fight off viruses, bacteria, and other infectious agents. When you own an allergy, your immune system treats a harmless substance, love dust or pollen, as a threat. To fight this perceived threat, your immune system makes antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE).

Substances that cause an allergic reaction are called allergens. Besides dust and pollen, other common allergens include animal dander, foods, including nuts and shellfish, and certain medicines, such as penicillin. Allergy symptoms can range from sneezing and a stuffy nose to a life-threatening complication called anaphylactic shock. Allergy blood tests measure the quantity of IgE antibodies in the blood.

A little quantity of IgE antibodies is normal. A larger quantity of IgE may mean you own an allergy.

Other names: IgE allergy test, Quantitative IgE, Immunoglobulin E, Entire IgE, Specific IgE

Have you ever wondered whether the symptoms you experience are due to an allergy, intolerance or sensitivity to a specific substance or product?

Do you know what the difference is between every those conditions?

At ROC Private Clinic we are capable to assist you get a clear answer.

The most useful tool in deciding whether someone is allergic is to conduct an ‘allergy history’.

A excellent clinician can generally identify likely allergens from the history.

In order to assist diagnose an allergy we may carry out:

  1. Skin Prick Allergy Tests
  2. Blood Tests (RAST) Ig E
  3. Patch Allergy Testing

Patch Allergy Testing

Patch Testing is a well-established method of identifying allergens in allergic contact dermatitis.

The testing involves applying patches containing various allergens.

You will be required to attend the clinic at 48 and 96 hours in order to finish the patch testing assessment. Our testing panels include the majority of allergens in the British and European Baseline Series including metals / preservatives / dyes / glues / steroid creams / rubber / perfumes.

Blood Tests for Allergy

Blood testing is particularly helpful as antihistamine medication does not need to be stopped and in such circumstances when rare or unusual allergens are suspected.

We carry out Ig E testing and we can target:

  1. Rhinitis specific allergens
  2. Food allergens
  3. Eczema specific allergens
  4. Drug allergens
  5. Individual allergens as suggested by the history
  6. Insect allergens
  7. Airborne allergens

We are capable to test to over 500 allergens.

Do investigate at the time of booking and our team will be capable to help.

Skin Prick Allergy Testing

Skin Prick Allergy Testing is a well-established method of identifying allergens by using drops of suspected allergens.

Skin Prick Testing can reliably identify airborne as well as food allergens. The testing involves applying droplets of allergen extracts generally on the forearm, followed by pricking the skin with a lancet. The results are ready within 15-20 minutes. You should stop taking antihistamines up to 5 days before the procedure, depending on the type of antihistamine.

Rhinolight Treatment for Hayfever and Rhinitis!

This is the latest treatment for allergic rhinitis that does not involve medication.

The treatment delivers light therapy to the nose and produces benefits to individuals suffering from allergic as well as perennial rhinitis. For more information on this treatment please read here!

Would love to know more?

Please contact us for further information and our Allergy Clinic brochure where you can discover out more about Skin Prick Allergy Testing, Patch Testing, Rhinolight treatments and our fees.


Discussion

The incidence of post-exercise RTS in endurance runners in this study (n=12, 75%) was higher than that in most other reported studies,1 possibly owing to the inclusion of subjects with a prior history of allergy; in most previous studies, allergy was seen as a confounding factor in determining the incidence of URTI and was therefore excluded.

Interestingly, in this field trial, subjects with systemic evidence of RTS associated with an allergic reaction accounted for 42% (n=5) of the 12 cases with post-exercise RTS.

However, as seen by the lack of significance between post-race RTS incidence in Phadiatop-positive and negative groups (Fig. 1), the incidence of post-race RTS symptoms was not defined by the Phadiatop test.

Our primary finding was that, of the 7 Phadiatop-positive subjects who developed post-race RTS, only 4 (58%) displayed clinically elevated sIgE concentrations above the cut-off point for allergy (sIgE >100 IU/ml). The mildly elevated eosinophil concentrations often seen in allergic responses13 were not evident in the Phadiatop-positive group (p>0.05).

Although specific sIgE antibody testing (SPT) provides evidence of sensitisation to an allergen, an allergic disease response only develops once the individual is exposed to that specific allergen; therefore, although the Phadiatop test may provide satisfactory accuracy in identifying predisposition to allergic responsiveness to airborne allergens, on its own it may not predict the development of allergic disease in trail runners.

Owing to the fixed selection of allergens, it is theoretically possible to miss subjects who are sensitised to less common inhalant allergens (such as local flora or fauna), as was the case in one of our subjects.

The predictive validity of the Phadiatop assay for the incidence of exercise-induced RTS of allergic origin in the trail runners must therefore be questioned.

Acknowledgements. Ms Heidi Mocke and the Wildlands Conservation Believe are thanked for permitting the collection of these data at the 2011 Three Cranes Challenge multi-day trail run and for providing the research team with accommodation in the ‘race village’ located in the Bushwillow Campsite.

Dr Rentia Dennisen, Professor Andrew Mckune, Mr Navin Singh and Mr Ronnie Naicker are thanked for their support with the field-side collection of data reported in this article. Mr Asokaran Rajh is thanked for his assistance with the graphic artwork.

References

1. Peters EM, Bateman ED. Ultramarathon running and upper respiratory tract infections. S Afr Med J 1983;64:582-584. [PMID: 6623247]

1. Peters EM, Bateman ED. Ultramarathon running and upper respiratory tract infections. S Afr Med J 1983;64:582-584.

[PMID: 6623247]

2. Walsh NP, Gleeson M, Shephard RJ, et al. Position statement. Part 1: Immune function and exercise. Exerc Immunol Rev 2011;17:6-63. [PMID: 21446352]

2. Walsh NP, Gleeson M, Shephard RJ, et al. Position statement. Part 1: Immune function and exercise. Exerc Immunol Rev 2011;17:6-63. [PMID: 21446352]

3. Schwellnus M, Lichaba M, Derman W. Respiratory tract symptoms in endurance athletes – a review of causes and consequences.

Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology 2010;3(2):3-9.

3. Schwellnus M, Lichaba M, Derman W. Respiratory tract symptoms in endurance athletes – a review of causes and consequences. Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology 2010;3(2):3-9.

4. Spence L, Brown WJ, Pyne DB, et al. Incidence, etiology, and symptomatology of upper respiratory illness in elite athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2007;39(4):577-586. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/mss.0b013e31802e851a] [PMID: 17414793]

4.

Spence L, Brown WJ, Pyne DB, et al. Incidence, etiology, and symptomatology of upper respiratory illness in elite athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2007;39(4):577-586. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/mss.0b013e31802e851a] [PMID: 17414793]

5. Cox AJ, Gleeson M, Pyne DB, Callister R, Hopkins WG, Fricker PA. Clinical and laboratory evaluation of upper respiratory symptoms in elite athletes. Clin J Sport Med 2008;18(5):438-445. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0b013e318181e501] [PMID: 18806552]

5. Cox AJ, Gleeson M, Pyne DB, Callister R, Hopkins WG, Fricker PA. Clinical and laboratory evaluation of upper respiratory symptoms in elite athletes.

Clin J Sport Med 2008;18(5):438-445. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0b013e318181e501] [PMID: 18806552]

6. Reid VL, Gleeson M, Williams N, Clancy RL.

What is an allergy panel blood test

Clinical investigation of athletes with persistent fatigue and/or recurrent infections. Br J Sports Med 2004;38:42-45 [PMID: 14751944]

6. Reid VL, Gleeson M, Williams N, Clancy RL. Clinical investigation of athletes with persistent fatigue and/or recurrent infections. Br J Sports Med 2004;38:42-45 [PMID: 14751944]

7. Anderson SD, Kippelen P. Airway injury as a mechanism for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2008;122(2):225-235. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2008.05.001] [PMID: 18554705]

7. Anderson SD, Kippelen P. Airway injury as a mechanism for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2008;122(2):225-235. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2008.05.001] [PMID: 18554705]

8. Bermon S.

What is an allergy panel blood test

Airway inflammation and upper respiratory tract infection in athletes: is there a link? Exerc Immunol Rev 2007;13:6-14. [PMID: 18198657]

8. Bermon S. Airway inflammation and upper respiratory tract infection in athletes: is there a link? Exerc Immunol Rev 2007;13:6-14. [PMID: 18198657]

9. Peters E M. Postrace upper respiratory tract ‘infections’ in ultramarathoners – infection, allergy or inflammation? South African Journal of Sports Medicine 2004;16(1):52-57.

9.

Peters E M. Postrace upper respiratory tract ‘infections’ in ultramarathoners – infection, allergy or inflammation?

What is an allergy panel blood test

South African Journal of Sports Medicine 2004;16(1):52-57.

10. Thomas S, Wolfarth B, Wittmer C, Nowak D, Radon K, GA2LEN-Olympic StudyTeam. Self-reported asthma and allergies in top athletes compared to the general population: results of the German part of the GA2LEN-Olympic Study, 2008.

What is an allergy panel blood test

Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2010;6:31. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1710-1492-6-31] [PMID: 21118543]

10. Thomas S, Wolfarth B, Wittmer C, Nowak D, Radon K, GA2LEN-Olympic StudyTeam. Self-reported asthma and allergies in top athletes compared to the general population: results of the German part of the GA2LEN-Olympic Study, 2008. Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2010;6:31. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1710-1492-6-31] [PMID: 21118543]

11. Bonini S, Bonini M, Bousquet J, et al. Rhinitis and asthma in athletes: an ARIA document in collaboration with GA2LEN.

Allergy 2006;61(6):681-692. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2006.01080.x] [PMID: 16677236]

11. Bonini S, Bonini M, Bousquet J, et al. Rhinitis and asthma in athletes: an ARIA document in collaboration with GA2LEN. Allergy 2006;61(6):681-692. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2006.01080.x] [PMID: 16677236]

12. Vidal C, Gude F, Boquete O, et al. Evaluation of the Phadiatop test in the diagnosis of allergic sensitization in a general adult population. J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2005;15(2):124-130. [PMID: 16047713]

12. Vidal C, Gude F, Boquete O, et al. Evaluation of the Phadiatop test in the diagnosis of allergic sensitization in a general adult population.

What is an allergy panel blood test

J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2005;15(2):124-130. [PMID: 16047713]

13. Morris A. Atopy, anamnesis and allergy testing. InnovAiT 2009;2(3):158-165. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/innovait/inp001]

13. Morris A. Atopy, anamnesis and allergy testing. InnovAiT 2009;2(3):158-165. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/innovait/inp001]

14. Garcia-Marcos L, Sanchez-Solis M, Martinez-Torres AE, Lucas Moreno JM, Hernando Sastre V. Phadiatop compared to skin-prick test as a tool for diagnosing atopy in epidemiological studies in schoolchildren. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2007;18:240-244. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2006.00508.x] [PMID: 17346300]

14.

Garcia-Marcos L, Sanchez-Solis M, Martinez-Torres AE, Lucas Moreno JM, Hernando Sastre V. Phadiatop compared to skin-prick test as a tool for diagnosing atopy in epidemiological studies in schoolchildren. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2007;18:240-244. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2006.00508.x] [PMID: 17346300]

15. Dill DB, Costill DL. Calculation of percentage changes in volumes of blood, plasma and red cells in dehydration. J Appl Physiol 1974; 37(2):247-248. [PMID: 4850854]

15. Dill DB, Costill DL. Calculation of percentage changes in volumes of blood, plasma and red cells in dehydration. J Appl Physiol 1974; 37(2):247-248.

[PMID: 4850854]

Accepted 9 February 2012.

Table 1. Phadiatop assay results and peak race-induced sIgE concentrations of the 16 subjects

Phadiatop-positive

(n=9)

Phadiatop-negative

(n=7)

Subject

Phadiatop result*

(sIgE conc.) (IU/ml)

Peak sIgE conc.

(IU/ml)† (time-point)

Subject

Phadiatop result*

(sIgE conc.) (IU/ml)

Peak sIgE conc.

(IU/ml)† (time-point)

1

8.51

85.64 (24PR)

5

0.13

23.64 (24PR)

2

75.80

227.14 (24PR)

6

0.17

19.46 (72PR)

3

7.55

54.38 (24PR)

10

0.12

55.44 (24PR)

4

0.41

56.32 (24PR)

12

0.28

33.58 (24PR)

7

7.19

445.74 (24PR)

14

0.12

11.30 (24PR)

8

3.42

240.48 (72PR)

15

0.14

140.82 (24PR)

9

0.50

76.13 (24PR)

16

0.11

66.79 (24PR)

11

9.49

63.14 (24PR)

13

41.30

274.0 (S1pre)

Median

7.55‡

85.64‡

Median

0.13

33.58

Fig.

1. Median (IQR) pre- (left) and post-race (right) entire RTS index scores of Phadiatop-positive* (n=9) and negative (n=7) groups. (*sIgE concentration >0.35 IU/ml in Phadiatop assay)

Fig. 2. Median (IQR) of absolute sIgE* concentrations† of Phadiatop-positive and negative groups, at 8 stages during and after a 3-day 95 km trail run. (*Adjusted for plasma volume; †Reference range 0 — 100 IU/ml)


Testimonials

I recently completed a course of Rhinolight as I suffer from allergic rhinitis, in specific with certain pollen and home dust mites. My symptoms were fairly severe, with sneezing fits, a constantly runny nose and nighttime congestion that hampered my sleep.

Whilst the impact of the treatment wasn’t instantly noticeable (I didn’t own a ‘eureka’ moment), now that the course is over it’s clear that it’s made a massive difference to my day to day existence. I no longer need packets of tissues with me wherever I go, and I am sleeping through the night!

I really wish more people knew about Rhinolight as I genuinely believe it can be a gamechanger for those who suffer from allergies.

Rachelpatient

Why Are IgE Tests Done?

An allergen-specific IgE test may be done to glance for some kinds of allergies. These include types of food, animal dander, pollen, mold, medicine, dust mites, latex, or insect venom.

How Is an IgE Test Done?

Most blood tests take a little quantity of blood from a vein.

To do that, a health professional will:

  1. put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood
  2. insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand)
  3. clean the skin
  4. pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe
  5. take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the vein

In babies, blood draws are sometimes done as a «heel stick collection.» After cleaning the area, the health professional will prick your baby’s heel with a tiny needle (or lancet) to collect a little sample of blood.

Collecting a sample of blood is only temporarily uncomfortable and can feel love a quick pinprick.

What Is an Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin E Test?

An allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) test measures the levels of diverse IgE antibodies.

Antibodies are made by the immune system to protect the body from bacteria, viruses, and allergens. IgE antibodies are normally found in little amounts in the blood, but higher amounts can be found when the body overreacts to allergens.

IgE antibodies are diverse depending on what they react to. An allergen-specific IgE test can show what the body is reacting to.

How Endless Does an IgE Test Take?

Most blood tests take just a few minutes. Occasionally, it can be hard to discover a vein, so the health professional may need to attempt more than once.

How Should We Prepare for an IgE Test?

Your kid should be capable to eat and drink normally unless also getting other tests that require fasting beforehand.

Tell your doctor about any medicines your kid takes because some drugs might affect the test results.

Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt for the test can make things easier for your kid, and you also can bring along a toy or book as a distraction.

When Are IgE Test Results Ready?

Blood samples are processed by a machine, and it may take a few days for the results to be available. If the test results show signs of a problem, the doctor might order other tests to figure out what the problem is and how to treat it.

Can I Stay With My Kid During an IgE Test?

Parents generally can stay with their kid during a blood test.

Urge your kid to relax and stay still because tensing muscles can make it harder to draw blood. Your kid might desire to glance away when the needle is inserted and the blood is collected. Assist your kid to relax by taking slow deep breaths or singing a favorite song.

What Happens After an IgE Test?

The health professional will remove the elastic band and the needle and cover the area with cotton or a bandage to stop the bleeding. Afterward, there may be some mild bruising, which should go away in a few days.

What Is a Blood Test?

A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken from the body to be tested in a lab.

Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of glucose, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can assist them detect problems love a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can assist them see how well an organ (such as the liver or kidneys) is working.

Meet our experts

Request an appointment

Nicola Harrison

  1. Location(s): London, Harley Street
  2. Clinical Interest(s): Contraception and Sexual Health | Gynaecology | Dermatology | Kid Health | Allergy | Weight Loss | Preventative Health Care.
  3. Qualifications: BSc.

    | MBBS. | MRCGP. | DRCOG. | DFFP.

  4. BIO:

    Dr. Nicola Harrison has been the Head of Clinical Governance of ROC London Clinic until 2017 when she was appointed as ROC London Clinic’s Medical Director. She is also the registered manager with the Care Quality Commission for the London Clinic. She graduated from Guy’s and St Thomas’s Medical School, London in 2003. She also became a member of the Royal College of General Practitioners in 2007.

    She holds the Diploma of the Faculty of Family Planning and the Diploma of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecology. Dr Nicola Harrison runs our preventative health programmes and childhood immunisation programmes. She consults children and adults for allergy related disorders and she is the clinical lead at ROC for Allergy Assessments and testing.

Dr. Cristina Romete

  1. Location(s): Aberdeen — ROC Private Clinic
  2. Clinical Interest(s): Complex Medical Conditions, Cardiovascular Disease, Preventative Medicine, Mental Health, Occupational Medicine, Alternative Medicine: Acupuncture
  3. Qualifications: Msc.

    | MRCGP. | DOccMed. | DRCOG. | DFFP.

  4. BIO:

    Dr Romete is the founder of ROC Private Clinic and the managing director of ROC Private Clinic and ROC Heath services. She is the Managing Director for ROC Private Clinic and ROC Health Services, a sister company providing Occupational Health Services in UK.

Testimonials

I recently completed a course of Rhinolight as I suffer from allergic rhinitis, in specific with certain pollen and home dust mites.

My symptoms were fairly severe, with sneezing fits, a constantly runny nose and nighttime congestion that hampered my sleep.

Whilst the impact of the treatment wasn’t instantly noticeable (I didn’t own a ‘eureka’ moment), now that the course is over it’s clear that it’s made a massive difference to my day to day existence. I no longer need packets of tissues with me wherever I go, and I am sleeping through the night!

I really wish more people knew about Rhinolight as I genuinely believe it can be a gamechanger for those who suffer from allergies.

Rachelpatient

Why Are IgE Tests Done?

An allergen-specific IgE test may be done to glance for some kinds of allergies.

These include types of food, animal dander, pollen, mold, medicine, dust mites, latex, or insect venom.

How Is an IgE Test Done?

Most blood tests take a little quantity of blood from a vein. To do that, a health professional will:

  1. put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood
  2. insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand)
  3. clean the skin
  4. pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe
  5. take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the vein

In babies, blood draws are sometimes done as a «heel stick collection.» After cleaning the area, the health professional will prick your baby’s heel with a tiny needle (or lancet) to collect a little sample of blood.

Collecting a sample of blood is only temporarily uncomfortable and can feel love a quick pinprick.

What Is an Allergen-Specific Immunoglobulin E Test?

An allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) test measures the levels of diverse IgE antibodies.

Antibodies are made by the immune system to protect the body from bacteria, viruses, and allergens. IgE antibodies are normally found in little amounts in the blood, but higher amounts can be found when the body overreacts to allergens.

IgE antibodies are diverse depending on what they react to. An allergen-specific IgE test can show what the body is reacting to.

How Endless Does an IgE Test Take?

Most blood tests take just a few minutes. Occasionally, it can be hard to discover a vein, so the health professional may need to attempt more than once.

How Should We Prepare for an IgE Test?

Your kid should be capable to eat and drink normally unless also getting other tests that require fasting beforehand.

Tell your doctor about any medicines your kid takes because some drugs might affect the test results.

Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt for the test can make things easier for your kid, and you also can bring along a toy or book as a distraction.

When Are IgE Test Results Ready?

Blood samples are processed by a machine, and it may take a few days for the results to be available. If the test results show signs of a problem, the doctor might order other tests to figure out what the problem is and how to treat it.

Can I Stay With My Kid During an IgE Test?

Parents generally can stay with their kid during a blood test.

Urge your kid to relax and stay still because tensing muscles can make it harder to draw blood. Your kid might desire to glance away when the needle is inserted and the blood is collected. Assist your kid to relax by taking slow deep breaths or singing a favorite song.

What Happens After an IgE Test?

The health professional will remove the elastic band and the needle and cover the area with cotton or a bandage to stop the bleeding. Afterward, there may be some mild bruising, which should go away in a few days.

What Is a Blood Test?

A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken from the body to be tested in a lab.

Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of glucose, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can assist them detect problems love a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can assist them see how well an organ (such as the liver or kidneys) is working.

Meet our experts

Request an appointment

Gillian Vance

  1. Location(s): Aberdeen
  2. Clinical Interest(s): Food Allergy And Anaphylaxis | Pollen-Fruit Syndrome | Asthma | Allergic Rhino-Conjunctivitis And Immunotherapy | Allergic Gastrointestinal Disease | Urticarial And Angioedema | Drug Allergy | Eczema | Venom Allergy.
  3. Qualifications: MB BChir.| MA (hons)| Ph.D.

    | MRCPCH (UK) | Dip Med Ed (Newcastle).

  4. BIO:

    Dr.Vance qualified in Medicine from Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in 1992. She also took a higher specialist training in Allergy, Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Southampton General Hospital and Grand Ormond Highway Hospital. Dr. Vance has an academic portfolio with initial PhD investigating the early life factors that may influence the development of allergy. She now also leads a team in medical education research at the University of Newcastle.

Dr. Wassim Fayed

  1. Location(s): London — ROC Harley Highway Clinic
  2. Clinical Interest(s): Integrative Health, Preventative Health, Sexual Health, Men’s Health, Gut Health, Occupational Health, Complicated presentations and Multiple Co morbidities
  3. Qualifications: BSc., LMSSA., MRCP., MRCGP.
  4. BIO:

    Dr Wassim Fayed is the current Medical Director of ROC London Clinic and he ensures that the ROC London Clinic performs to the level expected of ROC and meets the demands and challenges of modern medicine at an ultimate personal level of healthcare delivery.

en españolAnálisis de sangre: inmunoglobulina E (IgE) alérgeno específico

Are There Any Risks From IgE Tests?

An IgE test is a safe procedure with minimal risks.

Some kids might feel faint or lightheaded from the test.

What is an allergy panel blood test

A few kids and teens own a strong fear of needles. If your kid is anxious, talk with the doctor before the test about ways to make the procedure easier.

A little bruise or mild soreness around the blood test site is common and can final for a few days. Get medical care for your kid if the discomfort gets worse or lasts longer.

If you own questions about the IgE test, speak with your doctor or the health professional doing the blood draw.

Phadiatop testing in assessing predisposition to respiratory tract symptoms of allergic origin in athletes

Anton H de Waard, Edith M Peters

Objectives.

To validate the use of the Phadiatop test as a predictor of allergy-associated respiratory tract symptoms (RTS) in trail runners.

Methods. The incidence of self-reported RTS was documented in 16 runners for 31 days and related to the Phadiatop status and circulating markers of allergic responses (changes in concentrations of serum IgE (sIgE), differential leucocyte counts) at 8 time points before, during and after a 3-day 95 km trail run.

Results. Twelve (75%) athletes, of whom 7 (58%) were Phadiatop-positive, presented with post-race RTS. A peak sIgE concentration >100 IU/ml accompanied RTS in only 4 (57%) of the symptomatic Phadiatop-positive subjects.

There was no significant difference between the eosinophil and basophil concentrations of the positive and negative groups (p>0.05). One Phadiatop-negative subject presented with RTS as well as a peak sIgE concentration >100 IU/ml.

Conclusion. The Phadiatop assay does not accurately predict the development of post-exercise RTS of allergic origin in trail runners.

S Afr Med J 2012;102(5):309-311.

Division of Human Physiology, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban

Anton H de Waard, M Tech Hom

Edith M Peters, MSc (Med), PhD

Corresponding author: E M Peters ([email protected])

Since the early 1980s there has been concern about the high incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) among athletes during periods of intensive exercise training and exhaustive endurance events.1,2 This results in interrupted training schedules and impaired performance in competitive events.

Exercise immunologists own sought methods to identify the cause of these symptoms, which own now been extended to include the lower respiratory tract.3

Of post-exercise respiratory tract symptoms (RTS), 30 — 40% of cases are the result of infection, a further 30% are due to inflammation, and the final 30% are from unknown causes.2,4 Numerous theories own been proposed to account for the occurrence of non-infective post-exercise RTS, including the development of hyper-reactive airways,7 runaway inflammatory responses,8 reactivation of latent viral infection6 and allergic reactions.3,9

It has been documented that athletes experience higher rates of allergic disease than the general population10 and that the cited incidence of allergy among Olympic athletes is increasing.11 Exercise-induced symptoms of infection of the respiratory tract can mimic an allergic reaction,3 and exercise induces a TH2-dominant immunological shift;2 therefore, it may up-regulate an allergic response in those already sensitised.9 Increased exposure of athletes to irritants and allergens may contribute to this.3,11

Although the skin prick test (SPT) is generally accepted as the standard method for detecting IgE-related allergic sensitisation,12 its limitations include a lowered response in the elderly, greater difficulty in grading the response in dark-skinned persons, its contra-indication in pregnancy, the quality and selection of allergens, and the theoretical risk of anaphylaxis.13

Specific IgE antibody testing is accepted as an alternative to the SPT.12 Combination tests such as the Phadiatop assay (Pharmacia & Upjohn Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) simultaneously test for IgE to a mixture of allergens causing common inhalant allergies.

Allergens included in the Phadiatop assay are Artemisia, dust mites (Dermatophagoidespteronyssinus and D.farinae), mixed moulds (Penicillium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus and Alternaria), pet dander (cat and dog), mixed grasses (Parietaria, Lolium, Phleum and Cynodon), and mixed trees (Acer, Betula, Olea, Salix, Pinus, Ulmus, Quercus, Eucalyptus, Acacia and Melaleuca).14 This assay has been found satisfactory for the diagnosis of IgE allergic sensitisation in the general population, with a sensitivity of 70.8% and a specificity of 90.7% compared with the SPT.12

Our objectives were to: (i) investigate the validity of the Phadiatop test as a predictor of allergy-associated RTS in athletes competing in a 3-day 95 km trail run, (ii) document the incidence of RTS before, during and after the event, and (iii) relate these incidences to the concentrations of serum IgE, leucocyte sub-classes and Phadiatop status of the athletes throughout and after the event.


Results

Of the 16 subjects (12 women, 4 men; age 25 — 50 years), 9 were Phadiatop-positive and 7 were Phadiatop-negative.

The median and range of body mass index (23.8, 18.7 — 27.7 v. 20.9, 19.7 — 25.3) and percentage body fat (20.9%, 15.7 — 29.3% v. 23.7%, 17.2 — 30.6%) did not differ significantly between Phadiatop-positive and negative groups. Baseline testing of vital signs was within the normal range, and subjects did not present with evidence of medical conditions that could own placed their health at risk. Table 1 presents the results of the Phadiatop assay and peak sIgE concentrations.

The criteria for post-race RTS were met by 12 (75%) subjects, of whom 7 (58%) were Phadiatop-positive and 5 (42%) were Phadiatop-negative.

The median (IQR) pre- and post-race RTS index scores of the Phadiatop groups did not differ significantly (p>0.05) (Fig. 1).

Fig.

What is an allergy panel blood test

2 presents the median (IQR) sIgE concentrations of the subjects (adjusted for PV). There was a non-significant (p=0.37) rise in the sIgE concentrations of the entire group over the course of testing, with highest concentrations recorded in 75% of subjects at the 24PR time period. There was a highly significant (p<0.001) difference between the sIgE concentrations of the Phadiatop-positive and negative groups.

Concentrations of sIgE reached clinical significance (peak sIgE >100 IU/ml) in 5 (42%) of the 12 RTS-positive subjects (4 Phadiatop-positive and RTS-positive subjects and 1 Phadiatop-negative and RTS-positive subject).

There was no significant exercise-induced elevation in PV-adjusted concentrations of either basophils or eosinophils over time (p>0.05), and the difference between Phadiatop-positive and negative groups in terms of eosinophil or basophil response to 3 days of exercise was not significant (p>0.05).


What happens when a person suspects an allergy?

If a patient believes they own had an allergic reaction, he or she will meet with Dr.

Rahimi to discuss the symptoms, potential causes, and what testing or treatment is needed. The doctor examines the patient and asks detailed questions about the allergic symptoms to understand the situation. He may order a variety of tests to collect more information about the potential allergy. The results of these tests, including the presence of certain proteins in the blood or any rash-like reactions on the skin, would indicate an allergy. Most doctors consent that additional testing and monitoring is necessary to identify food allergies. The doctor may enquire the patient to follow an elimination diet or hold a food diary including details of what has been eaten and any subsequent symptoms.

Treatment can start once the allergy is identified.


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What is an allergy panel blood test