What is an allergy action plan

In the drop, the greater Dallas area experiences “weed season” in which ragweed pollen is one of the most predominant allergens your kids face each day on their way to and from school, or anytime they’re outdoors. An abundance of ragweed pollen this time of year can lead to increased asthma symptoms, rhinitis (hay fever), and worsening eczema skin irritations.

Ragweed pollen can also cause conjunctivitis – commonly known as pinkeye.

Additional seasonal allergens that appear in abundance in the Dallas area from September through November, include:

  1. Great ragweed
  2. Narrow-leaf marsh-elder
  3. Corn
  4. Perennial ragweed
  5. Bermuda sagebrush
  6. Palmer’s amaranth
  7. Annual marsh-elder
  8. White sagebrush
  9. Spiny amaranth
  10. Perennial ryegrass

Beyond this list of severe allergens, cedar elm, sugar-berry trees, and alfalfa are among the other culprits that may trigger more moderate allergy symptoms.

If you’re not certain which allergies pose the biggest threat to your children, Dr. Rahimi can test them to discover out.


Create an allergy emergency action plan.

If your kid has a severe allergy, make certain you own an action plan that you can share with teachers and the school nurse so they know what to do to assist your kid in the event of an urgent situation. For example, if they need an inhaler or an epinephrine auto-injector (sometimes referred to by its brand name EpiPen®) for a severe allergic reaction, be certain every the staff members at the school who spend time with your kid know what to do and how to use them.

Having an action plan in put before it’s ever needed gives you and your kid peace of mind that they’ll get the care they need, as time is often of the essence when it comes to an allergic reaction.


Know your child’s allergy triggers and how to manage them.

Nearly 6 million children in the U.S. own food allergies, and seasonal allergies affect about 40% of school-aged kids. Allergies not only get in the way of learning and concentration during a endless day in the classroom, but they can also lead to emergency situations if your kid and their teachers aren’t careful.

Knowing what triggers your child’s allergies and how to manage their symptoms is imperative for keeping your kid comfortable and safe at school.

If you don’t know the exact cause of your children’s allergies, make an appointment with Dr. Rahimi to get them tested as soon as possible. When you know the triggers and the severity of a potential allergic reaction, you can prepare faculty and the school nurse ahead of time and equip your kid or staff members with necessary medications.

Common food allergy triggers include:

  1. Eggs
  2. Peanuts
  3. Wheat
  4. Shellfish
  5. Milk or other dairy products
  6. Soy

Other allergy triggers commonly include:

  1. Dust
  2. Pet dander
  3. Molds
  4. Tree, plant, and weed pollen
  5. Insect bites

While insect bites may not be as common in the drop as they are in spring and summer months, if your kid is allergic to them, it’s always a excellent thought to remain vigilant any time of year.

Any of these triggers can cause symptoms that make it hard for children to stay focused at school.

Once you understand their triggers, you can create a treatment plan that teachers and school nurses can follow as necessary.

You can also be proactive in keeping triggers away from your children whenever possible. For example, most schools own “peanut-free zones” in the cafeteria, so if your child’s nut allergies are severe, you can make certain they don’t come in contact with nuts, while eating lunch at school.

Or, for example, if your kid is particularly sensitive to ragweed pollen, send an additional set of clothes to school so they can change after outdoor recess.


Nearly one in 50 Americans are at risk for anaphylaxis

Some children are allergic to certain foods, medicines, insects and latex. When they come into contact with these things they develop symptoms, such as hives and shortness of breath. This is known as an allergic reaction. Things that cause an allergic reaction are called allergens. Take every allergic symptoms seriously because both mild and severe symptoms can lead to a serious allergic reaction called anaphylaxis (anna-fih-LACK-sis).

Be Aware of Symptoms of Anaphylaxis

The symptoms of anaphylaxis may happen shortly after having contact with an allergen and can get worse quickly.

You can’t predict how your kid will react to a certain allergen from one time to the next. Both the types of symptoms and how serious they are can change. So, it’s significant for you to be prepared for every allergic reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis must be treated correct away to provide the best chance for improvement and prevent serious, potentially life-threatening complications.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis generally involve more than one part of the body such as the skin, mouth, eyes, lungs, heart, gut, and brain. Some symptoms include:

  1. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  2. Skin rashes and itching and hives
  3. Stomach pain, vomiting or diarrhea
  4. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing (whistling sound during breathing)
  5. Dizziness and/or fainting
  6. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Your child’s doctor will give you a finish list of symptoms.

Be Prepared for Anaphylaxis

Keep an Emergency Plan with You

You, your kid, and others who supervise or care for your kid need to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and how to treat it.

Your child’s doctor will give you a written step-by-step plan on what to do in an emergency. The plan is called an allergy emergency care plan or anaphylaxis emergency action plan. To be prepared, you, your kid, and others who care for your kid need to own copies of this plan.

About Epinephrine

Epinephrine is the medicine used to treat anaphylaxis. The emergency action plan tells you when and how to give epinephrine.

You cannot rely on antihistamines to treat anaphylaxis.

Know How to Use Epinephrine

Learn how to give your kid epinephrine. Epinephrine is safe and comes in an easy-to-use device called an auto-injector. When you press it against your child’s outer thigh, it injects a single dose of medicine. Your child’s health care team will show you how to use it. You, in turn, can teach people who spend time with your kid how to use it.

Always own two epinephrine auto-injectors near your kid. Do not store epinephrine in your car or other places where it will get too boiling or too freezing. Discard if the liquid is not clear, and replace it when it expires.

After Anaphylaxis

  1. Follow the steps in your child’s emergency care plan to give your kid epinephrine correct away.

    This can save your child’s life.

  2. Make a follow up appointment or an appointment with an allergy specialist to further diagnose and treat the allergy.
  3. Protocols to prevent exposure to food allergens; and
  4. After giving epinephrine, always call or a local ambulance service. Tell them that your kid is having a serious allergic reaction and may need more epinephrine.
  5. Procedures for responding to life-threatening allergic reactions to food;
  6. Your kid needs to be taken to a hospital by ambulance. Medical staff will watch your kid closely for further reactions and treat him or her if needed.

  7. Sometimes, a reaction is followed by a second, more severe, reaction known as a biphasic reaction. This second reaction can happen within 4 to 8 hours of the first reaction or even later. That’s why people should be watched in the emergency room for several hours after anaphylaxis.
  8. A process for developing and implementing a Food Allergy Action Plan or an equivalent form completed and signed by a licensed medical provider, for each student with a known life-threatening food allergy who has an emergency auto-injector at school;
  9. Notice to every District families on the prevention of exposure to food allergens upon initial enrollment and annually at the start of the school year via the Annual Food Allergy Notice ( E1).

  10. Annual education and training on the management of students with life-threatening food allergies, including training related to the istration of medication with an auto-injector for school personnel who interact with students. School personnel include but are not limited to, building istrators, teachers, classroom aides, office staff, social workers/ psychologists, nurse/health personnel, food service staff, lunchroom and playground supervisors, substitute staff, and custodial staff

Common Causes of Anaphylaxis

Foods.

The most common food allergies are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish and shellfish. The most common food allergies in infants and children are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, soy and wheat.

Insect stings from bees, wasps, yellow jackets and fire ants.

Latex found in things such as balloons, rubber bands, hospital gloves.

Medicines, especially penicillin, sulfa drugs, insulin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin and ibuprofen.

Take Steps to Avoid Anaphylaxis

The best way to avoid anaphylaxis is for your kid to stay away from allergens. Teach your kid about his or her allergy in an age-appropriate way.

Teach your kid to tell an adult about a reaction, how to avoid allergens and how and when to use an epinephrine auto-injector. Here are some first steps you can take for each type of allergy:

Food. Learn how to read food labels and avoid cross-contact. Read the label every time you purchase a product, even if you’ve used it before. Ingredients in any given product may change.

Insect allergies. Wear closed-toe shoes and insect repellent when outdoors.

Avoid loose-fitting clothing that can trap an insect between the clothing and the skin.

Medicine allergies. Tell your doctor about medicines your kid is allergic to. Know both the generic and brand names of the medicines.

Latex allergies.

What is an allergy action plan

Tell your doctors, dentists and other health care providers about your child’s latex allergy. Enquire them to put a note in your child’s medical chart about your child’s allergy. Also remind them of the allergy before any medical procedure or test.

For every allergies:  Educate family, friends, the school and others who will be with your kid about your child’s allergies. They can assist your kid avoid allergens and help if anaphylaxis occurs.

Reviewed by medical advisors June

Know How to Treat Anaphylaxis

  • Follow the steps in your child’s emergency care plan to give your kid epinephrine correct away.

    This can save your child’s life.

  • After giving epinephrine, always call or a local ambulance service. Tell them that your kid is having a serious allergic reaction and may need more epinephrine.
  • Your kid needs to be taken to a hospital by ambulance. Medical staff will watch your kid closely for further reactions and treat him or her if needed.

istrative Procedure — FOOD ALLERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

This management program for students with life-threatening food allergies is based on the Guidelines for Managing Life-Threatening Food Allergies in Illinois Schools, developed by the Illinois State Board of Education and the Illinois Department of Public Health.

In accordance with Illinois School Code Section , this management program includes the following elements:

istrative Procedure — FOOD ALLERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

This management program for students with life-threatening food allergies is based on the Guidelines for Managing Life-Threatening Food Allergies in Illinois Schools, developed by the Illinois State Board of Education and the Illinois Department of Public Health. In accordance with Illinois School Code Section , this management program includes the following elements:

  • A description of the extent to which the student’s contact with or exposure to the allergen/food could result in a reaction.
  • Annual education and training on the management of students with life-threatening food allergies, including training related to the istration of medication with an auto-injector for school personnel who interact with students.

    School personnel include but are not limited to, building istrators, teachers, classroom aides, office staff, social workers/ psychologists, nurse/health personnel, food service staff, lunchroom and playground supervisors, substitute staff, and custodial staff

  • Wash allergen safe tables with school district-approved cleaning agents (not dishwashing soap) and paper towels before and after lunch/snack.
  • A description of each food allergy including the symptoms or how an adverse reaction may be presented or manifested (i.e., hives, swelling, vomiting, difficulty breathing, etc.) and the severity of the allergy.

    What is an allergy action plan

  • Establish cleaning procedures for common areas using district-approved cleaning agents.
  • Establish allergen safe zones, such as a student’s individual classroom, allergen safe lunch table(s) or areas in the lunchroom.
  • A process for developing and implementing a Food Allergy Action Plan or an equivalent form completed and signed by a licensed medical provider, for each student with a known life-threatening food allergy who has an emergency auto-injector at school;
  • Adapt curriculum, awards,/rewards, by substituting allergen-safe food or non-food items in rooms where students having a known food allergy may be present.
  • Avoid the use of food products as displays or components of displays in schools.
  • In the event an emergency auto injector is istered, emergency responders (EMS) will be directed to transport the student to the nearest hospital.
  • A description of the student’s past allergic reactions, including triggers and warning signs.
  • Documentation of an anaphylaxis event and/or epinephrine istration will be completed in conjunction with the appropriate district incident report.
  • Items and surfaces used to prepare meals will be properly cleaned and sanitized between uses, to remove allergens and prevent cross-contamination.

  • If applicable, age-appropriate ways in which the student can be included in implementing their food allergy action plan.
  • The Food Allergy Action Plan will be implemented. If no plan is on file, the District will immediately call
  • The student will remain under adult supervision.
  • Protocols to prevent exposure to food allergens; and
  • Inform parent/guardians in advance of any in-class academic activity where food will be served or used.
  • Communicate with parents/guardians the presence of severe food allergies within the classroom setting detailing acceptable snacks that fit the needs of the classroom.
  • Procedures for responding to life-threatening allergic reactions to food;
  • If warranted, will be called as soon as possible.
  • The student’s parent/guardian will be notified as soon as practicable.
  • Encourage students to wash hands before and after eating (wipes or soap and water).
  • Communicate to parent teacher groups the presence of severe food allergies within the school setting
  • Discourage sharing or trading snacks, lunches, or drinks at school.
  • Notice to every District families on the prevention of exposure to food allergens upon initial enrollment and annually at the start of the school year via the Annual Food Allergy Notice ( E1).

  • Facilitate the acquisition of ingredient lists for food products and classroom products available in the school. Provide access to parent/guardian when requested.
  • Obtain emergency allergy procedures from the bus company. Inform parents of emergency procedures relative to food allergies. Parent/guardians must determine if/how student shall be transported to school.

Section 1: Food Allergy Action Plan
Parents/guardians of students should notify the school of the food allergies on the Health Questionnaire during the initial or annual registration process or as needed and provide the school with appropriate medical information so the allergies may be managed properly in the school setting.

Parent/guardians who indicate a severe food allergy will be requested to finish and return the following ; Food Allergy History Form (upon initial diagnosis) and a Food Allergy Action Plan (annually) form from a licensed medical provider.

Parents may use District forms (E2) Food Allergy History Form and/or ( E3) Food Allergy Action Plan or equivalent.

Food Allergy History Form (requested upon initial diagnosis) will include the following:

  1. A description of each food allergy including the symptoms or how an adverse reaction may be presented or manifested (i.e., hives, swelling, vomiting, difficulty breathing, etc.) and the severity of the allergy.

  2. A description of the extent to which the student’s contact with or exposure to the allergen/food could result in a reaction.
  3. A description of the student’s past allergic reactions, including triggers and warning signs.
  4. If applicable, age-appropriate ways in which the student can be included in implementing their food allergy action plan.

If an emergency auto injector is to be kept at school, a Food Allergy Action Plan is required to be completed annually and signed by a licensed medical provider and the parent/guardian of the student.
The student’s parent/guardian is responsible for providing the school with a minimum of one epinephrine auto-injector (if applicable) and every other necessary medications (such as antihistamine and/or asthma medications), in accordance with the District’s policies on istration of medication ().

A Food Allergy Action Plan will be developed and reviewed by the school nurse and parent/guardian.

The plan will be implemented and distributed to the appropriate school personnel, this includes but not limited to building istrators, the student’s teacher(s), specialists/coaches, health professionals, school office staff, school counselor, social worker, food service director and staff, custodial staff, lunch/recess supervisors, transportation staff, and/or the student, as appropriate.

If the student’s parent/guardian refuses to cooperate with the District in the development and/or implementation of an appropriate management plan, the District may develop and implement a simple Emergency Action Plan stating that will be called immediately upon recognition of any symptoms.

The District will send written notification via certified mail of any such plan to the parent/guardian.

Section 2: Procedures for Responding to Life-Threatening Allergic Reactions to Food
When a student with a known life-threatening food allergy is suspected of experiencing an allergic reaction, the following procedures will be occur:

  1. In the event an emergency auto injector is istered, emergency responders (EMS) will be directed to transport the student to the nearest hospital.
  2. The student will remain under adult supervision.
  3. Communicate with parents/guardians the presence of severe food allergies within the classroom setting detailing acceptable snacks that fit the needs of the classroom.
  4. If warranted, will be called as soon as possible.
  5. Establish allergen safe zones, such as a student’s individual classroom, allergen safe lunch table(s) or areas in the lunchroom.
  6. Avoid the use of food products as displays or components of displays in schools.
  7. The Food Allergy Action Plan will be implemented.

    What is an allergy action plan

    If no plan is on file, the District will immediately call

  8. Encourage students to wash hands before and after eating (wipes or soap and water).
  9. Discourage sharing or trading snacks, lunches, or drinks at school.
  10. Adapt curriculum, awards,/rewards, by substituting allergen-safe food or non-food items in rooms where students having a known food allergy may be present.
  11. Documentation of an anaphylaxis event and/or epinephrine istration will be completed in conjunction with the appropriate district incident report.
  12. Inform parent/guardians in advance of any in-class academic activity where food will be served or used.
  13. Communicate to parent teacher groups the presence of severe food allergies within the school setting
  14. Establish cleaning procedures for common areas using district-approved cleaning agents.
  15. Facilitate the acquisition of ingredient lists for food products and classroom products available in the school.

    Provide access to parent/guardian when requested.

  16. The student’s parent/guardian will be notified as soon as practicable.
  17. Wash allergen safe tables with school district-approved cleaning agents (not dishwashing soap) and paper towels before and after lunch/snack.
  18. Items and surfaces used to prepare meals will be properly cleaned and sanitized between uses, to remove allergens and prevent cross-contamination.
  19. Obtain emergency allergy procedures from the bus company.

    Inform parents of emergency procedures relative to food allergies. Parent/guardians must determine if/how student shall be transported to school.

Section 3: Protocols to Prevent Exposure to Food Allergens

For each student with a known life-threatening food allergy, the appropriate school personnel will be informed of the student’s allergy and risk reduction procedures will be implemented during the school day.

Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

Section 1: Food Allergy Action Plan
Parents/guardians of students should notify the school of the food allergies on the Health Questionnaire during the initial or annual registration process or as needed and provide the school with appropriate medical information so the allergies may be managed properly in the school setting.

Parent/guardians who indicate a severe food allergy will be requested to finish and return the following ; Food Allergy History Form (upon initial diagnosis) and a Food Allergy Action Plan (annually) form from a licensed medical provider.

Parents may use District forms (E2) Food Allergy History Form and/or ( E3) Food Allergy Action Plan or equivalent.

Food Allergy History Form (requested upon initial diagnosis) will include the following:

  1. A description of each food allergy including the symptoms or how an adverse reaction may be presented or manifested (i.e., hives, swelling, vomiting, difficulty breathing, etc.) and the severity of the allergy.

  2. A description of the extent to which the student’s contact with or exposure to the allergen/food could result in a reaction.
  3. A description of the student’s past allergic reactions, including triggers and warning signs.
  4. If applicable, age-appropriate ways in which the student can be included in implementing their food allergy action plan.

If an emergency auto injector is to be kept at school, a Food Allergy Action Plan is required to be completed annually and signed by a licensed medical provider and the parent/guardian of the student.
The student’s parent/guardian is responsible for providing the school with a minimum of one epinephrine auto-injector (if applicable) and every other necessary medications (such as antihistamine and/or asthma medications), in accordance with the District’s policies on istration of medication ().

A Food Allergy Action Plan will be developed and reviewed by the school nurse and parent/guardian.

The plan will be implemented and distributed to the appropriate school personnel, this includes but not limited to building istrators, the student’s teacher(s), specialists/coaches, health professionals, school office staff, school counselor, social worker, food service director and staff, custodial staff, lunch/recess supervisors, transportation staff, and/or the student, as appropriate.

If the student’s parent/guardian refuses to cooperate with the District in the development and/or implementation of an appropriate management plan, the District may develop and implement a simple Emergency Action Plan stating that will be called immediately upon recognition of any symptoms.

The District will send written notification via certified mail of any such plan to the parent/guardian.

Section 2: Procedures for Responding to Life-Threatening Allergic Reactions to Food
When a student with a known life-threatening food allergy is suspected of experiencing an allergic reaction, the following procedures will be occur:

  1. In the event an emergency auto injector is istered, emergency responders (EMS) will be directed to transport the student to the nearest hospital.
  2. The student will remain under adult supervision.
  3. Communicate with parents/guardians the presence of severe food allergies within the classroom setting detailing acceptable snacks that fit the needs of the classroom.
  4. If warranted, will be called as soon as possible.
  5. Establish allergen safe zones, such as a student’s individual classroom, allergen safe lunch table(s) or areas in the lunchroom.
  6. Avoid the use of food products as displays or components of displays in schools.
  7. The Food Allergy Action Plan will be implemented.

    If no plan is on file, the District will immediately call

  8. Encourage students to wash hands before and after eating (wipes or soap and water).
  9. Discourage sharing or trading snacks, lunches, or drinks at school.
  10. Adapt curriculum, awards,/rewards, by substituting allergen-safe food or non-food items in rooms where students having a known food allergy may be present.
  11. Documentation of an anaphylaxis event and/or epinephrine istration will be completed in conjunction with the appropriate district incident report.
  12. Inform parent/guardians in advance of any in-class academic activity where food will be served or used.
  13. Communicate to parent teacher groups the presence of severe food allergies within the school setting
  14. Establish cleaning procedures for common areas using district-approved cleaning agents.
  15. Facilitate the acquisition of ingredient lists for food products and classroom products available in the school.

    Provide access to parent/guardian when requested.

  16. The student’s parent/guardian will be notified as soon as practicable.
  17. Wash allergen safe tables with school district-approved cleaning agents (not dishwashing soap) and paper towels before and after lunch/snack.
  18. Items and surfaces used to prepare meals will be properly cleaned and sanitized between uses, to remove allergens and prevent cross-contamination.
  19. Obtain emergency allergy procedures from the bus company. Inform parents of emergency procedures relative to food allergies.

    Parent/guardians must determine if/how student shall be transported to school.

Section 3: Protocols to Prevent Exposure to Food Allergens

For each student with a known life-threatening food allergy, the appropriate school personnel will be informed of the student’s allergy and risk reduction procedures will be implemented during the school day.

Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Communicate with parents/guardians the presence of severe food allergies within the classroom setting detailing acceptable snacks that fit the needs of the classroom.
  • Inform parent/guardians in advance of any in-class academic activity where food will be served or used.
  • Identification of high-risk food allergy areas.
  • Establish allergen safe zones, such as a student’s individual classroom, allergen safe lunch table(s) or areas in the lunchroom.
  • At the start of school year, review with every building staff the emergency response protocols as well as bullying and sensitivity issues related to students who own allergic reactions to food.
  • Provide a modified breakfast/lunch menu form to parent and coordinate this information with the District Food Service Provider (Registered Dietitian) to make the appropriate accommodations as required.

  • Avoid the use of food products as displays or components of displays in schools.
  • Plan for the following on field trips:
  • At the start of each school year send a letter home to parents/guardians indicating known food allergies in the classroom. Provide update of this notice if new food allergies are identified during the school year.
  • Provide in-service opportunities for food service staff at the beginning of the year and as appropriate. Including a list of students with known food allergies.
  • Items and surfaces used to prepare meals will be properly cleaned and sanitized between uses, to remove allergens and prevent cross-contamination.

  • Review the student’s Food Allergy Action Plan at least 24 hours prior to the field trip.
  • The istration of other medications, such as antihistamines as defined by School Board policy.
  • Obtain emergency allergy procedures from the bus company. Inform parents of emergency procedures relative to food allergies. Parent/guardians must determine if/how student shall be transported to school.
  • Provide, in advance, notice to the parent/guardian of identified students with food allergies of any in-class events where food will be present.

  • Obtain the completed Food Allergy History form from parents/guardians (new diagnosis)
  • Communicate to parent teacher groups the presence of severe food allergies within the school setting
  • Ensure the student has allergen safe food supplied by the parent.
  • Obtain or finish the Food Allergy Action Plan with the parent/guardian annually.

    What is an allergy action plan

  • Provide food allergy awareness training to staff members who may interact with the student.
  • Ensure student has an allergen safe area available in the lunchroom as appropriate.
  • The istration of an emergency auto-injector as defined by School Board policy.
  • Encourage students to wash hands before and after eating (wipes or soap and water).
  • In the event of suspected allergic reactions, ensure the student is accompanied by an adult at every times.
  • Ensure food or products containing identified allergens are not used for class projects, science experiments, or celebrations.
  • Distribute the Food Allergy Action Plans to staff as appropriate.
  • Review emergency procedures and any Food Allergy Action Plan with the appropriate staff prior to field journey.

  • Procedures to prevent exposure to food allergens.
  • Ensure there is a communication process in put and reviewed with staff who own regular contact with student who own known food allergies (i.e., two-way radios on the playground, etc)
  • Discuss with students, at an appropriate developmental level, food allergies that are known in the classroom and procedures in put to avoid food allergen exposure in the classroom setting.
  • Carry a cell phone to call if needed,
  • The common signs and symptoms of allergic/anaphylactic reactions, which may include difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, a drop in blood pressure, hives, itching (in any part of the body), runny nose, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps, hoarse voice, coughing, wheezing, tightness or closing of the throat, swelling (in any part of the body), red/watery eyes, and/or a sense of doom.
  • Assign a staff member, who has been trained to implement the Food Allergy Action Plan and emergency medication, to monitor the student’s activities during the field journey.

    This is only necessary if a parent/guardian is not present.

  • Facilitate the acquisition of ingredient lists for food products and classroom products available in the school. Provide access to parent/guardian when requested.
  • Wash allergen safe tables with school district-approved cleaning agents (not dishwashing soap) and paper towels before and after lunch/snack.
  • Adapt curriculum, awards,/rewards, by substituting allergen-safe food or non-food items in rooms where students having a known food allergy may be present.
  • Delegate the proper cleaning of the allergen safe areas in the lunchroom and classroom (when the classroom is used as a lunchroom or if snacks are consumed).
  • Discourage sharing or trading snacks, lunches, or drinks at school.
  • Supervise cleaning the student’s table or immediate eating area prior to any meals.

  • Ensure the student washes his/her hands prior to eating.
  • Encourage students to bring healthy allergen safe snacks to school.
  • Ensure access to emergency medication during emergency situations or drills (i.e., fire drills, lockdowns, etc.)
  • Maintain a copy of the student’s Food Allergy Action Plan in the classroom sub folder.
  • Establish cleaning procedures for common areas using district-approved cleaning agents.
  • Emergency response procedures.
  • Bullying and sensitivity issues that students with allergies may face in the school setting.

Additional responsibilities for appropriate school representatives include but are not limited to:

School Nurse

  1. Obtain or finish the Food Allergy Action Plan with the parent/guardian annually.

  2. Provide food allergy awareness training to staff members who may interact with the student.
  3. Provide in-service opportunities for food service staff at the beginning of the year and as appropriate. Including a list of students with known food allergies.
  4. Obtain the completed Food Allergy History form from parents/guardians (new diagnosis)
  5. Ensure student has an allergen safe area available in the lunchroom as appropriate.
  6. Ensure access to emergency medication during emergency situations or drills (i.e., fire drills, lockdowns, etc.)
  7. Distribute the Food Allergy Action Plans to staff as appropriate.
  8. Review emergency procedures and any Food Allergy Action Plan with the appropriate staff prior to field journey.

    What is an allergy action plan

  9. Provide a modified breakfast/lunch menu form to parent and coordinate this information with the District Food Service Provider (Registered Dietitian) to make the appropriate accommodations as required.

Teacher

  • Maintain a copy of the student’s Food Allergy Action Plan in the classroom sub folder.
  • At the start of each school year send a letter home to parents/guardians indicating known food allergies in the classroom.

    Provide update of this notice if new food allergies are identified during the school year.

  • Provide, in advance, notice to the parent/guardian of identified students with food allergies of any in-class events where food will be present.
  • Ensure food or products containing identified allergens are not used for class projects, science experiments, or celebrations.
  • Encourage students to bring healthy allergen safe snacks to school.
  • Discuss with students, at an appropriate developmental level, food allergies that are known in the classroom and procedures in put to avoid food allergen exposure in the classroom setting.
  • In the event of suspected allergic reactions, ensure the student is accompanied by an adult at every times.
  • Plan for the following on field trips:
    1. Assign a staff member, who has been trained to implement the Food Allergy Action Plan and emergency medication, to monitor the student’s activities during the field journey.

      This is only necessary if a parent/guardian is not present.

    2. Review the student’s Food Allergy Action Plan at least 24 hours prior to the field trip.
    3. Ensure the student has allergen safe food supplied by the parent.
    4. Supervise cleaning the student’s table or immediate eating area prior to any meals.
    5. Ensure the student washes his/her hands prior to eating.
    6. Carry a cell phone to call if needed,

    School Principal

    1. Ensure there is a communication process in put and reviewed with staff who own regular contact with student who own known food allergies (i.e., two-way radios on the playground, etc)
    2. At the start of school year, review with every building staff the emergency response protocols as well as bullying and sensitivity issues related to students who own allergic reactions to food.
    3. Delegate the proper cleaning of the allergen safe areas in the lunchroom and classroom (when the classroom is used as a lunchroom or if snacks are consumed).

    Section 4: Education and Training

    In accordance with School Code Section , a Licensed School Nurse will conduct an in-service training program in anaphylactic reactions and management for building personnel who work with students.

    Appropriate food allergy training for faculty and staff will include, but not limited to:

    1. The common signs and symptoms of allergic/anaphylactic reactions, which may include difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, a drop in blood pressure, hives, itching (in any part of the body), runny nose, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps, hoarse voice, coughing, wheezing, tightness or closing of the throat, swelling (in any part of the body), red/watery eyes, and/or a sense of doom.
    1. Procedures to prevent exposure to food allergens.
    2. Identification of high-risk food allergy areas.
    3. The istration of other medications, such as antihistamines as defined by School Board policy.
    4. Emergency response procedures.
    5. The istration of an emergency auto-injector as defined by School Board policy.
    6. Bullying and sensitivity issues that students with allergies may face in the school setting.

    LEGAL REF: ILCS 5/

    Reviewed: January 18, , January 11,
    Adopted: January 18,
    Revisions: January 25,

    In most cases, people with allergies develop mild to moderate symptoms, such as watery eyes, a runny nose or a rash.

    But sometimes, exposure to an allergen can cause a life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis. This severe reaction happens when an over-release of chemicals puts the person into shock. Allergies to food, insect stings, medications and latex are most frequently associated with anaphylaxis.

    A second anaphylactic reaction, known as a biphasic reaction, can happen as endless as 12 hours after the initial reaction.

    Call and get to the nearest emergency facility at the first sign of anaphylaxis, even if you own already istered epinephrine, the drug used to treat severe allergic reactions.

    Just because an allergic person has never had an anaphylactic reaction in the past to an offending allergen, doesn’t mean that one won’t happen in the future.

    What is an allergy action plan

    If you own had an anaphylactic reaction in the past, you are at risk of future reactions.

    Additional responsibilities for appropriate school representatives include but are not limited to:

    School Nurse

    1. Obtain or finish the Food Allergy Action Plan with the parent/guardian annually.
    2. Provide food allergy awareness training to staff members who may interact with the student.
    3. Provide in-service opportunities for food service staff at the beginning of the year and as appropriate. Including a list of students with known food allergies.
    4. Obtain the completed Food Allergy History form from parents/guardians (new diagnosis)
    5. Ensure student has an allergen safe area available in the lunchroom as appropriate.

    6. Ensure access to emergency medication during emergency situations or drills (i.e., fire drills, lockdowns, etc.)
    7. Distribute the Food Allergy Action Plans to staff as appropriate.
    8. Review emergency procedures and any Food Allergy Action Plan with the appropriate staff prior to field journey.
    9. Provide a modified breakfast/lunch menu form to parent and coordinate this information with the District Food Service Provider (Registered Dietitian) to make the appropriate accommodations as required.

    Teacher

  • Maintain a copy of the student’s Food Allergy Action Plan in the classroom sub folder.
  • At the start of each school year send a letter home to parents/guardians indicating known food allergies in the classroom. Provide update of this notice if new food allergies are identified during the school year.
  • Provide, in advance, notice to the parent/guardian of identified students with food allergies of any in-class events where food will be present.

  • Ensure food or products containing identified allergens are not used for class projects, science experiments, or celebrations.
  • Encourage students to bring healthy allergen safe snacks to school.
  • Discuss with students, at an appropriate developmental level, food allergies that are known in the classroom and procedures in put to avoid food allergen exposure in the classroom setting.
  • In the event of suspected allergic reactions, ensure the student is accompanied by an adult at every times.
  • Plan for the following on field trips:
    1. Assign a staff member, who has been trained to implement the Food Allergy Action Plan and emergency medication, to monitor the student’s activities during the field journey.

      This is only necessary if a parent/guardian is not present.

    2. Review the student’s Food Allergy Action Plan at least 24 hours prior to the field trip.
    3. Ensure the student has allergen safe food supplied by the parent.
    4. Supervise cleaning the student’s table or immediate eating area prior to any meals.
    5. Ensure the student washes his/her hands prior to eating.
    6. Carry a cell phone to call if needed,

    School Principal

    1. Ensure there is a communication process in put and reviewed with staff who own regular contact with student who own known food allergies (i.e., two-way radios on the playground, etc)
    2. At the start of school year, review with every building staff the emergency response protocols as well as bullying and sensitivity issues related to students who own allergic reactions to food.
    3. Delegate the proper cleaning of the allergen safe areas in the lunchroom and classroom (when the classroom is used as a lunchroom or if snacks are consumed).

    Section 4: Education and Training

    In accordance with School Code Section , a Licensed School Nurse will conduct an in-service training program in anaphylactic reactions and management for building personnel who work with students.

    Appropriate food allergy training for faculty and staff will include, but not limited to:

    1. The common signs and symptoms of allergic/anaphylactic reactions, which may include difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, a drop in blood pressure, hives, itching (in any part of the body), runny nose, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps, hoarse voice, coughing, wheezing, tightness or closing of the throat, swelling (in any part of the body), red/watery eyes, and/or a sense of doom.
    1. Procedures to prevent exposure to food allergens.
    2. Identification of high-risk food allergy areas.
    3. The istration of other medications, such as antihistamines as defined by School Board policy.
    4. Emergency response procedures.
    5. The istration of an emergency auto-injector as defined by School Board policy.
    6. Bullying and sensitivity issues that students with allergies may face in the school setting.

    LEGAL REF: ILCS 5/

    Reviewed: January 18, , January 11,
    Adopted: January 18,
    Revisions: January 25,

    In most cases, people with allergies develop mild to moderate symptoms, such as watery eyes, a runny nose or a rash.

    But sometimes, exposure to an allergen can cause a life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis. This severe reaction happens when an over-release of chemicals puts the person into shock. Allergies to food, insect stings, medications and latex are most frequently associated with anaphylaxis.

    A second anaphylactic reaction, known as a biphasic reaction, can happen as endless as 12 hours after the initial reaction.

    Call and get to the nearest emergency facility at the first sign of anaphylaxis, even if you own already istered epinephrine, the drug used to treat severe allergic reactions.

    Just because an allergic person has never had an anaphylactic reaction in the past to an offending allergen, doesn’t mean that one won’t happen in the future. If you own had an anaphylactic reaction in the past, you are at risk of future reactions.


    Make certain everyone is on the same page.

    Does your kid understand their allergies and what could trigger them? Once they’re ancient enough to go to school on their own, you should educate them on their triggers.

    If it’s a food allergy, assist them recognize which foods are safe to eat and which ones they should avoid. Remind kids not to share food with one another, as they may not know every the ingredients.

    It’s also a excellent thought to meet with the school nurse, istrator, and teachers, too. That way, everyone who spends time with your kid at school knows what to expect and how to assist them. It may even be as simple as letting teachers know your kid may rub their eyes or blow their nose frequently.

    Letting staff know it isn’t a freezing, but seasonal allergies, may assist them be more tolerant, too.

    Allergies are manageable when you understand what to avoid, what to do in an emergency, and how to prevent symptoms. If you need assist managing your child’s allergies this drop, please call our office to schedule a comprehensive allergy testing evaluation. Or feel free to use our convenient online booking tool.

    Author

    Allergy Relief Clinics

    As numerous as 1 in 50 people are at risk for anaphylaxis which is a severe, rapidly progressive, potentially life threatening allergic reaction.

    Anaphylaxis can happen from a variety of substances such as foods, medications, or insect venoms. Signs of anaphylaxis can include hives, swelling, shortness of breath, coughing, dizziness, low blood pressure or passing out. People are not born allergic to these substances but can become susceptible to developing an allergy after exposure.

    If a patient is concerned they may own a severe allergy to something, they should see a board certified allergist who will take a detailed allergic history and act out any allergy testing to determine if the patient is truly allergic. If a patient is found to be at risk for anaphylaxis, they will be taught how to avoid the allergen(s), get an anaphylaxis action plan that provides guidance on how to treat an allergic reaction should it happen, wear medical alert jewelry that describes their anaphylactic condition, and be prescribed epinephrine auto injectors and taught how to use them.

    An estimated million Americans were prescribed epinephrine auto injectors in but it is thought there are numerous more people at risk of anaphylaxis who should be carrying epinephrine.

    For those at risk of anaphylaxis, they should own epinephrine with them at every times in case of an accidental exposure and reaction. It is recommended that patients own two epinephrine auto injectors available because up to % of patients who experience anaphylaxis require more than one dose of epinephrine.

    Epinephrine should be used as soon as possible after recognizing the symptoms of possible anaphylaxis.

    What is an allergy action plan

    An anaphylaxis action plan will assist guide the decision on when to use the epinephrine but if you are unsure if epinephrine should be used, it is better to use it correct away than to wait. One of the risk factors for dying from anaphylaxis is delaying the first istration of epinephrine.

    If a patient has anaphylaxis, they should be istered epinephrine then seek immediate medical attention. Anaphylaxis may require treatment with multiple doses of epinephrine as well as other ancillary medications. Anaphylaxis can also initially improve but then worsen again hours later so a period of monitoring may be required.

    Some people attempt to use antihistamines, such as Benadryl first, but this only treats the skin symptoms of an allergic reaction and does not stop the potentially life-threatening symptoms such as respiratory or cardiovascular compromise. Medical guidelines every recommend epinephrine as the treatment of choice for anaphylaxis.

    School aged children at risk for anaphylaxis should own an anaphylaxis action plan and epinephrine auto injectors at school. Patients of every ages should always own epinephrine with them, but are cautioned not to leave the auto injectors in the car for extended periods, as the car reaches high temperatures, it will degrade the medication and make it ineffective.

    With proper precautions and preparation, patients at risk for anaphylaxis can hold themselves safe and ready to treat a reaction should one occur.

    If you are concerned that you may be at risk for anaphylaxis, please make an appointment today for an evaluation with any of our board certified allergists.

    Anaphylaxis: Severe Allergic Reactions


    Take medications before going to school.

    If your kid gets a runny nose or itchy, watery eyes this time of year, as is common with ragweed pollen, be certain to give them any preventive medications before they leave for school each morning.

    Taking allergy medication in the morning can oftentimes assist hold seasonal allergy symptoms at bay for the duration of their school day.

    If your kid takes prescription allergy medications, istering them before they go to school whenever possible can assist eliminate interruptions in throughout their day.


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