What is allergies

Colonization with the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium was significantly and independently associated with food allergy in young children with eczema enrolled in a pivotal peanut allergy prevention study.

S.aureus is a marker for severe eczema, and early eczema is a widely recognized risk factor for developing food allergies in young children.

But the findings from the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study cohort show that even after controlling for eczema severity, skin S. aureus positivity was associated with an increased risk for developing allergies to peanuts, eggs, and cow’s milk.

S.

aureus colonization was also associated with persistent egg allergy until at least age 5 or 6 years in the LEAP cohort analysis in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The lead researcher, Olympia Tsilochristou, MD, of Kings College London, said in a press statement that the findings could assist explain why young children with eczema own a extremely high risk for developing food allergies. While the exact mechanisms linking the two are not known, «our results propose that the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus could be an significant factor contributing to this outcome,» she said.

The findings also propose that S.

aureus colonization may inhibit peanut tolerance among at-risk infants when peanuts are introduced extremely early in life.

Among the nine participants in the peanut-consumption arm of the study (i.e., no peanut allergy at baseline) who had confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, every but one were colonized with S.

What is allergies

aureus at one or more LEAP study visits.

«The fact that S. aureus was associated with greater risk of peanut allergy among peanut consumers but not peanut avoiders further suggests that peanut consumption was less effective in the prevention of peanut allergy among participants with S. aureus compared with those with no S. aureus,» the researchers wrote.

The LEAP study enrolled infants ages 4-11 months with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both. The babies were randomized to therapeutic peanut consumption or peanut avoidance, and every had eczema clinical evaluation and culture of skin and nasal swabs at baseline.

The follow-up LEAP-On study assessed the children at age 72 months, after 12 months of peanut avoidance in both groups.

Skin and nasal swabs were obtained at baseline and at age 12, 30, and 60 months.

A entire of 48.8% of the participants had some form of S. aureus colonization (32.2% skin and 32.3% nasal) on at least one LEAP study visit, with most having just one positive test result. The greatest rates of colonization were recorded at 4-11 months of age.

S. aureus colonization was significantly associated with eczema severity, along with hen’s egg white and peanut specific immunoglobulin (sIg)E production at any LEAP visit. But even after controlling for eczema severity, hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE levels at each LEAP and LEAP-On visit were significantly associated with skin S.

aureus positivity, the team noted.

«This relationship was even stronger when we looked into high-level hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE production,» the researchers wrote. «Similar findings were noted for cow’s milk, where high-level sIgE production to milk at 30, 60, and 72 months of age was related to any skin S. aureus colonization. Together, these data propose that S. aureus is associated with hen’s egg, peanut, and cow’s milk allergy.»

In the LEAP study, extremely early peanut consumption was found to reduce the risk of peanut allergy at 60 months in infants at high risk for developing the allergy, but infants in the consumption arm of the study with S.

aureus colonization were approximately seven and four times more likely to own confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, the team said.

Study strengths, Tsilochristou and co-authors noted, included the rigorous design; a limitation was the reliance on bacteriological culture to identify S. aureus colonization rather than using DNA-based testing.

«S. aureus has been implicated in the development and severity of atopic diseases, namely eczema, allergic rhinitis, and asthma; our findings extend these observations to the development of food allergy independent of eczema severity,» the investigators concluded.

«The role of S.

aureus as a potential environmental factor should be considered in future interventions aimed at inducing and maintaining tolerance to food allergens in eczematous infants. Further prospective longitudinal studies measuring S. aureus with more advanced techniques and interventional studies eradicating S. aureus in early infancy will assist elucidate its role in the development of eczema or food allergy,» the team wrote.

Priya Verma is a NCCPA Board Certified Physician Assistant treating patients at Atlanta Allergy & Asthma’s Woodstock office. She has over 20 years of clinical experience.

Priya received her Bachelor of Science in Biology/Molecular Genetics from The Ohio State University (1995) where she published research in Neuro Immunology from The Ohio State Medical School.

In 1998, she received her Master of Science in Physician Assistant from Seton Hall University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ.

Before joining Atlanta Allergy & Asthma, Priya practiced in the field of sports medicine and integrative health. She has consistently ranked as a top provider in patient satisfaction scores by Press-Ganey. She has served in numerous leadership roles for both local hospitals and national organizations for Physician Assistants.

What is allergies

Priya has taught in the Cobb County School District’s outreach program and is involved with Technology Association of Georgia (TAG). She is also a Certified Yoga Therapist and a member of the International Association of Yoga Therapy.

Priya is a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

In her free time, Priya enjoys teaching yoga, hiking, and spending time with her husband and children.

Publications

Wolfe SA Jr, Ha BK, Whitlock BB, Saini P. (1997) Differential localization of three distinct binding sites for sigma receptor ligands in rat spleen. J Neuroimmunol. 1997 Jan;72(1):45-58

Whitlock BB, Liu Y, Chang S, Saini P, Ha BK, Barrett TW, Wolfe SA Jr. (1996) Initial Characterization and autoradiographic localization of a novel sigma/opioid binding site in immune tissues J Neuroimmunology 1996 Jul;67(2):83-96

Poster Presentation

Saini P, Whitlock BB, Liu Y, Wolfe SA (1995) Binding sites for Sigma Ligands in rat spleen: differential localization of three distinct sites.

What is allergies

Presented at Society for Neuroscience

Saini P. Sullivan Mark (1991) Drug inhibition of Class III Anti-arrhythmic Agent, Sematilide by receptor blocker, Phentolamine Partners in Science Internship Program, Berlex Laboratories, Cedar Knolls, NJ Presented at NJ Academy of Science and Liberty Science Middle

Colonization with the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium was significantly and independently associated with food allergy in young children with eczema enrolled in a pivotal peanut allergy prevention study.

S.aureus is a marker for severe eczema, and early eczema is a widely recognized risk factor for developing food allergies in young children.

But the findings from the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study cohort show that even after controlling for eczema severity, skin S.

aureus positivity was associated with an increased risk for developing allergies to peanuts, eggs, and cow’s milk.

S. aureus colonization was also associated with persistent egg allergy until at least age 5 or 6 years in the LEAP cohort analysis in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The lead researcher, Olympia Tsilochristou, MD, of Kings College London, said in a press statement that the findings could assist explain why young children with eczema own a extremely high risk for developing food allergies.

While the exact mechanisms linking the two are not known, «our results propose that the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus could be an significant factor contributing to this outcome,» she said.

The findings also propose that S. aureus colonization may inhibit peanut tolerance among at-risk infants when peanuts are introduced extremely early in life.

Among the nine participants in the peanut-consumption arm of the study (i.e., no peanut allergy at baseline) who had confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, every but one were colonized with S.

aureus at one or more LEAP study visits.

«The fact that S. aureus was associated with greater risk of peanut allergy among peanut consumers but not peanut avoiders further suggests that peanut consumption was less effective in the prevention of peanut allergy among participants with S. aureus compared with those with no S. aureus,» the researchers wrote.

The LEAP study enrolled infants ages 4-11 months with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both. The babies were randomized to therapeutic peanut consumption or peanut avoidance, and every had eczema clinical evaluation and culture of skin and nasal swabs at baseline.

The follow-up LEAP-On study assessed the children at age 72 months, after 12 months of peanut avoidance in both groups.

Skin and nasal swabs were obtained at baseline and at age 12, 30, and 60 months.

A entire of 48.8% of the participants had some form of S. aureus colonization (32.2% skin and 32.3% nasal) on at least one LEAP study visit, with most having just one positive test result. The greatest rates of colonization were recorded at 4-11 months of age.

S. aureus colonization was significantly associated with eczema severity, along with hen’s egg white and peanut specific immunoglobulin (sIg)E production at any LEAP visit. But even after controlling for eczema severity, hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE levels at each LEAP and LEAP-On visit were significantly associated with skin S.

aureus positivity, the team noted.

«This relationship was even stronger when we looked into high-level hen’s egg white and peanut sIgE production,» the researchers wrote. «Similar findings were noted for cow’s milk, where high-level sIgE production to milk at 30, 60, and 72 months of age was related to any skin S. aureus colonization. Together, these data propose that S. aureus is associated with hen’s egg, peanut, and cow’s milk allergy.»

In the LEAP study, extremely early peanut consumption was found to reduce the risk of peanut allergy at 60 months in infants at high risk for developing the allergy, but infants in the consumption arm of the study with S.

aureus colonization were approximately seven and four times more likely to own confirmed peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months, the team said.

Study strengths, Tsilochristou and co-authors noted, included the rigorous design; a limitation was the reliance on bacteriological culture to identify S. aureus colonization rather than using DNA-based testing.

«S. aureus has been implicated in the development and severity of atopic diseases, namely eczema, allergic rhinitis, and asthma; our findings extend these observations to the development of food allergy independent of eczema severity,» the investigators concluded.

«The role of S.

aureus as a potential environmental factor should be considered in future interventions aimed at inducing and maintaining tolerance to food allergens in eczematous infants.

What is allergies

Further prospective longitudinal studies measuring S. aureus with more advanced techniques and interventional studies eradicating S. aureus in early infancy will assist elucidate its role in the development of eczema or food allergy,» the team wrote.

Priya Verma is a NCCPA Board Certified Physician Assistant treating patients at Atlanta Allergy & Asthma’s Woodstock office. She has over 20 years of clinical experience.

Priya received her Bachelor of Science in Biology/Molecular Genetics from The Ohio State University (1995) where she published research in Neuro Immunology from The Ohio State Medical School.

In 1998, she received her Master of Science in Physician Assistant from Seton Hall University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ.

Before joining Atlanta Allergy & Asthma, Priya practiced in the field of sports medicine and integrative health. She has consistently ranked as a top provider in patient satisfaction scores by Press-Ganey. She has served in numerous leadership roles for both local hospitals and national organizations for Physician Assistants. Priya has taught in the Cobb County School District’s outreach program and is involved with Technology Association of Georgia (TAG). She is also a Certified Yoga Therapist and a member of the International Association of Yoga Therapy.

Priya is a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

In her free time, Priya enjoys teaching yoga, hiking, and spending time with her husband and children.

Publications

Wolfe SA Jr, Ha BK, Whitlock BB, Saini P.

What is allergies

(1997) Differential localization of three distinct binding sites for sigma receptor ligands in rat spleen. J Neuroimmunol. 1997 Jan;72(1):45-58

Whitlock BB, Liu Y, Chang S, Saini P, Ha BK, Barrett TW, Wolfe SA Jr. (1996) Initial Characterization and autoradiographic localization of a novel sigma/opioid binding site in immune tissues J Neuroimmunology 1996 Jul;67(2):83-96

Poster Presentation

Saini P, Whitlock BB, Liu Y, Wolfe SA (1995) Binding sites for Sigma Ligands in rat spleen: differential localization of three distinct sites.

Presented at Society for Neuroscience

Saini P. Sullivan Mark (1991) Drug inhibition of Class III Anti-arrhythmic Agent, Sematilide by receptor blocker, Phentolamine Partners in Science Internship Program, Berlex Laboratories, Cedar Knolls, NJ Presented at NJ Academy of Science and Liberty Science Middle

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Dr. David Pearlman founded Colorado Allergy and Asthma Centers with Drs.

What is allergies

Avner and Buckley in 1972. He is certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology, for which he also served on the Board of Directors. He is also certified by the American Board of Pediatrics.

Dr. Pearlman attended Cornell University and received his Doctor of Medicine from State University of New York at Syracuse. He received his training in pediatrics at the University Hospitals of Cleveland and at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Middle, where he also had a post-doctoral fellowship in immunology. After a fellowship in pharmacology at the National Institute for Medical Research in London, England, he returned to the CU Medical School as Director of Pediatric Allergy before leaving in 1972.

He was honored with the Distinguished Clinician Award of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and The American Board of Pediatrics, CU Medical School and the Joint Allergy and Asthma Task Force for outstanding contribution to the field of allergy and immunology.

He has been listed in various publications as one of the Best Doctors in the U.S. since 1980.

Dr. Pearlman maintains an academic appointment at the University of Colorado Medical School as a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. He continues to be athletic in allergy and asthma research and has published over 150 articles and texts to inform physicians concerning advances in this field.

Your caring, compassionate, experienced allergy, asthma and immunology team.

Eric S.

Applebaum, MD, FACAAI

“I had a longstanding interest in how the immune system works. Allergy and immunology was a way to pursue my interest in caring for patients. I also enjoyed the thought of specializing; becoming an expert in one area rather than trying to remain capable in every areas as a generalist. I was interested in seeing patients of every ages, especially multiple family members. I wanted to make a difference in patients’ lives and assist with illnesses often ignored by other physicians.

“I most enjoy seeing how much better patients feel and how quickly they realize that they own been suffering unnecessarily for such extremely endless periods of time.

I treat patients love intelligent people capable of understanding their conditions and the treatment options available. I treat patients the way I desire to be treated when I own to see a doctor. I desire my patients to know that there are no hopeless cases. I am their advocate in every way they need me for their allergic problems. I take it as a personal challenge to assist them live better.”

When not working, Dr. Applebaum enjoys spending time with his wife and daughters, traveling, watching pro basketball, reading and cooking.

Board-Certified:American Board of Allergy & Immunology, American Board of Internal Medicine

Fellow:American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

Fellowship-Trained:Allergy & Immunology, Schneider Children’s Hospital & Endless Island Jewish Medical Middle, New Hyde Park, NY

Residency:Internal Medicine, Endless Island Jewish Medical Center

MD:Special Distinction for Research in Psychoneuroimmunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY

Member:American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, New Jersey Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Society, Medical Society of New Jersey, Morris County Medical Society

Awards:Castle Connolly Guide to Top Doctors in the New York Metro Area, 2000 to present

Julie Applebaum, MSN, RN, FNP-C

“I enjoy working here because while we are making an improvement in our patients’ health, we develop interpersonal relationships with our patients and their families on a professional level.

As a longtime allergy sufferer myself, I see the importance of treatment. Following patients from an initial visit through testing and then a step further by actually treating the underlying cause of their numerous years of suffering, it is rewarding to see the relief they experience when they are properly cared for.»

Board-Certified:Family Practice, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP)

Graduate School:Chamberlain College of Nursing

Member:American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology

Favorite Quote:«Don’t ever let anybody tell you you’re not excellent enough.»

Priscilla Leon, Office Manager

Favorite Quote:«I enjoy working in the allergy field as I can see the transition in patients from when they start treatment (a not so happy patient), to a patient that constantly praises how much better they are feeling ever since treatment began with Dr.

Applebaum.»

«In my spare time I am an avid runner, beach-goer and I enjoy photography»

Make us your trusted partners in effective allergy and asthma treatment. Believe Eric S. Applebaum, MD, for comprehensive allergy, asthma, sinusitis and immunology care. Call us at 973.335.1700 in Parsippany or use our online Request an Appointment form to schedule your consultation. We welcome patients from Mountain Lakes and Parsippany Troy Hills, including Montville, Parsippany, Denville (Morris County, NJ), Passaic (Passaic County, NJ).

Dr. Jennifer S. Lee received her medical degree from the University at Buffalo of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in Buffalo, New York.

She then went on to finish her residency in Pediatrics at the New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Middle. Following residency, she completed subspecialty training in Adult and Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at SUNY Buffalo School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. She is board certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology and the American Board of Pediatrics.

Dr. Lee is a member of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology as well as the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

She sees both pediatric and adult patients for diagnosis and treatment of wide range of allergic and immunologic disorders, such as nasal/ocular allergies, asthma, food allergies, eczema, and recurrent sinusitis.

Dr. Lee is fluent in Mandarin.


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