What is a sun allergy called

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

What is a sun allergy called

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

How to Stay Healthy, Breathe Easier, and Feel Energetic This Winter

Indoor allergies, freezing weather, less sunlight — winter can make it hard to stay well mentally and physically. Discover out how to protect yourself against seasonal allergies, the winter blahs, freezing winds, comfort-eating traps, and fatigue this year.

Learn More About the Ultimate Winter Wellness Guide

Sinusitis can be a confusing thing to treat for anyone.

Because a sinus infection can be so easily confused with a common freezing or an allergy, figuring out the best way to alleviate your symptoms can be difficult.

Even more challenging, a sinus infection can evolve over time from a viral infection to a bacterial infection, or even from a short-term acute infection to a long-term chronic illness.

We own provided for you the best sources of information on sinus infections to assist you rapidly define your ailment and get the best and most efficient treatment possible.


The Best Research Resources

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

This academy’s website provides valuable information to assist readers determine the difference between colds, allergies, and sinusitis.

A primer guide on sinusitis also provides more specific information about the chronic version of the illness. Additional resources include a «virtual allergist» that helps you to review your symptoms, as well as a database on pollen counts.

American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI)

In addition to providing a comprehensive guide on sinus infections, the ACAAI website also contains a wealth of information on allergies, asthma, and immunology. The site’s useful tools include a symptom checker, a way to search for an allergist in your area, and a function that allows you to ask an allergist questions about your symptoms.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

For allergy sufferers, the AAFA website contains an easy-to-understand primer on sinusitis.

It also provides comprehensive information on various types of allergies, including those with risk factors for sinusitis.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The CDC website provides basic information on sinus infections and other respiratory illnesses, such as common colds, bronchitis, ear infections, flu, and sore throat. It offers guidance on how to get symptom relief for those illnesses, as well as preventative tips on practicing good hand hygiene, and a recommended immunization schedule.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

The U.S.

National Library of Medicine is the world’s largest biomedical library. As part of the National Institutes of Health, their website provides the basics on sinus infection. It also contains a number of links to join you with more information on treatments, diagnostic procedures, and related issues.


Favorite Resources for Finding a Specialist

American Rhinologic Society

Through research, education, and advocacy, the American Rhinologic Society is devoted to serving patients with nose, sinus, and skull base disorders.

Their website’s thorough coverage of sinus-related issues includes rarer conditions, such as fungal sinusitis, which are often excluded from other informational sites. It also provides a valuable search tool to discover a doctor, as well as links to other medical societies and resources that are useful for patients.

Cleveland Clinic

Their website contains an exhaustive guide on sinusitis and an easy-to-use «Find a Doctor» search tool.

ENThealth

ENThealth provides useful information on how the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) are all connected, along with information about sinusitis and other related illnesses and symptoms, such as rhinitis, deviated septum, and postnasal drip.

As part of the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, this website is equipped with the ability to assist you discover an ENT specialist in your area.

Posted on: May 02, 2016


So, You’ve Been Diagnosed with Hives!

by Richard S. Roberts, M.D.

Chronic Hives

So, if acute hives don’t seem to own an allergic cause what else could be going on? One of the more common presumed causes, especially in children is post-infectious hives. During or within a week of viral, strep or other infections hives may happen through poorly understood mechanisms.

This often leads to confusion when antibiotics own been given for the infection. Were the hives from the antibiotic or from the underlying illness? Post-infectious hives can recur for up to 6 weeks.

What is a sun allergy called

At times, even without infection or any obvious trigger a few hours to a few days of hives happen. These are called acute idiopathic hives. We assume that the immune system is inappropriately activating the skin mast cells but we don’t know why. We don’t ponder that stress is a common cause.

So, your hives own gone on for more than 6 weeks, so they drop into the chronic urticaria category. Now what? Once again you’re not alone. Approximately 3 million Americans of every ages own the same problem.

There are some significant things that you should know. The first is that, unlike acute urticaria, less than 5% of the cases are due to some external cause. Also, unlike acute urticaria, the hives and /or swelling are rarely dangerous. In this form of hive problem various quirks and idiosyncrasies of the immune system, as they relate to mast cells, are the primary cause.

Our understanding of the problem is improving but there are numerous unanswered questions. The best understood of these idiosyncrasies is called chronic autoimmune urticaria.

Approximately 45% of every chronic hives are of this type. In this condition the immune system makes a detectable antibody (for which we own a test) that mistakenly thinks that parts of the mast cell surface are the enemy. This antibody attacks the skin mast cells which leads to the release of histamine, etc. It’s been known for a endless time that if our body makes one autoantibody type of error it’s easier for it to make other autoantibody mistakes. Therefore, it’s not terribly surprising that in chronic autoimmune urticaria approximately 20% of patients, especially women, will also own autoantibodies that target the thyroid gland.

What is a sun allergy called

This may lead to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and periodically blood tests for thyroid function should be checked. Unfortunately, treating this thyroid condition probably does not benefit the hives.

The next most common type of chronic urticaria is chronic idiopathic urticaria. This condition is almost certainly due to the immune system’s interaction with mast cells but the details are unknown. Both chronic autoimmune and chronic idiopathic urticaria may worsen during febrile illnesses, with the use of aspirin family medicines, prior to the monthly menstrual period or with sustained pressure to or rubbing of the skin.

Individual hives that sting more than itch, leave bruises and final 3 or more days may indicate hives due to vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels).

Other forms of chronic hives own to do with the immune system’s reaction to physical triggers. Hives produced by stroking of the skin is called dermographism. Some people’s hives are triggered just by freezing, heat, skin pressure, vibration, exercise, sun or even water. These conditions are fairly rare. Some exercise induced patients can either react just to exercise while others react only if their exercise follows the consumption of a food to which they are mildly allergic, most commonly wheat, celery and shellfish.

These exercise reactions can produce anaphylaxis and may be dangerous. Another dangerous condition, this one involving angioedema and never hives, is called hereditary angioedema. In these patients swelling of the upper airway can be fatal. Such patients also generally own pronounced abdominal pain from swelling of their intestines. Treatment is available.

So, now that you’ve put your hives into a category how are they treated? For acute hives and rare cases of chronic hives avoidance of triggers is the key. If the acute hives are already present antihistamines and if severe, a short course of oral steroid is used. For chronic hives daily preventative antihistamines are essential.

Doses higher than those used for nasal allergy treatment are often needed. If maximum antihistamine dosing has been reached without control, addition of an H2 blocker (e.g. Tagamet) and/or a leukotriene blocker (e.g. Singulair) may be tried. Maximizing the above therapy should minimize the need for oral steroid. Relying on recurrent courses of oral steroids (prednisone) especially without full antihistamine, H2 blocker and anti-leukotriene support is to be discouraged.

In rare cases cyclosporin or other immunomodulatory medicines may be added. Once control has been achieved medicines should be continued for several weeks or longer past the final symptoms. Slow tapering can then be attempted.

Do you really own the Hives?

Don’t despair. You’re not alone. Approximately 20% of the population will own hives (urticaria) at one time or another during their lifetime. First off, are you certain that they’re really hives? True hives are red, itchy, generally raised lesions that look very much love mosquito bites. They are often circular or oval but can be  irregularly shaped. Their size may vary from ¼ inch to several inches in diameter.

They may blend together. Each spot lasts anywhere from 4-36 hours and is surrounded by normal looking skin. As they resolve the skin looks normal, not flaky or rough. While the hives are present one spot will be resolving while another nearby is developing. In about 40% of cases localized swelling (angioedema) of the lips, eyelids, hands, feet or tongue also occurs.
So, if these are really hives they must be from an allergy, right? Well, unfortunately it’s not that simple and modern science doesn’t own every of the answers.

The history of how they first appeared and what’s happened to them since can provide significant clues as to what category of hives you own. But first, what actually is a hive? Everyone’s skin is made up of numerous types of cells. One of these cells is called a mast cell. Everyone’s mast cells make and store histamine. They also routinely make leukotrienes and other substances that can cause localized inflammation. Mast cells don’t generally release much of these substances into the surrounding skin but if they do, these substances, especially histamine produce localized redness, itch and swelling we recognize as a hive or if it’s slightly deeper, angioedema.

Allergy Hives

So, why are my mast cells releasing histamine and other things when they shouldn’t?

The first question that needs to be asked is for how endless own you had hives? Hives that own been present intermittently or daily for less than 6 weeks are called acute hives, and if longer, chronic hives. Amongst the numerous possible causes of acute hives those due to allergic reactions get the most attention. In allergic patients the mast cells are coated with an allergy antibody, called IgE, that recognizes a extremely specific target (peanut, penicillin, yellow jacket, etc.). When that substance, such as peanut, becomes attached to that allergy antibody a chain reaction occurs that activates the mast cell which results in the release of histamine and other inflammatory substances.

A hive is born! For food allergy reactions, there are 3 useful rules to consider:

  1. Second, it goes away within a few hours or at the most within a day or two.

    What is a sun allergy called

    Therefore, you never get hives for a week from one serving of peanut butter.

  2. First, the reaction begins quickly, within 5-30 minutes of eating the food; on rare occasions up to an hour but almost never longer.
  3. Third, the reaction is reproducible, meaning that if hives were caused by eating 4 peanuts on a Monday, eating 4 peanuts the following week will almost always cause the same problem. Despite favorite belief, artificial food colorings and food additives almost NEVER cause hives.

Hives from antibiotics is a diverse situation. The hive reaction can start anywhere from a few minutes after the first dose to 10 days after finishing the course.

Antibiotic related hives can persist for up to approximately 2 weeks.

Allergic hives from stinging insects are generally obvious but occasionally they can be sneaky by occurring while you’re asleep or distracted. They start quickly after the sting and resolve in a few hours to a few days. In the U.S. spiders, flies and mosquitoes almost never cause hives although rare cases own been reported.

Almost any medicine or herbal product can potentially cause hives but one of the most common medicines implicated is the aspirin family (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, etc.).

Isolated swelling without hives is a unique side effect of the ACE inhibitor blood pressure medicines. Soaps, detergents, fabric softeners almost never cause hives but if they do, the hives happen only where the skin is touched. Airborne allergy to pollen, dust, etc. almost never causes hives unless the person is in the midst of a massive hay fever attack. In an allergic person, direct skin contact with a potent allergic substance love animal saliva or latex can cause hives at the site. Every categories of allergic hives are potentially dangerous while chronic hives are generally not.

Conclusion

So, what’s my prognosis Doc?

As noted above:

  1. Less than 30% of idiopathic acute hives will go on to be chronic.
  2. Acute hives resolve spontaneously.
  3. If you own chronic hives that aren’t of the “physical” type at least 50% will resolve in less than a year and another 20% will resolve over the next several years.

    The “physical” hives tend to be more endless lasting.

Research is ongoing in every of these areas.

What is a sun allergy called

So hold your chin up, take your antihistamine, and get the necessary attention to the type of hives that you have.

Later that year, to mark the death of Prince, Cheerios posted an image of the words “Rest in peace,” with a single Cheerio dotting the “i” in the expression “in.” After a backlash, Cheerios hit delete. Maker’s Mark went with an image showing the distinctive red top of its bourbon bottle turned purple, Prince’s signature color. Annoyed fans noted that Prince did not drink alcohol.

What is a sun allergy called

Other companies, including 3M, Getty Images and Pornhub, were also accused of exploiting his passing to promote their products.

Despite that, several insurance companies own offered their condolences to Mr. Bryant’s family in recent days, and the Seminole Hard Rock hotel in Florida lit itself up in Lakers purple and gold.

Other companies, especially those that worked with Mr. Bryant, opted for a milder approach: a black-and-white photo paired with a statement honoring his life and expressing concern for the families of the victims.

Nike, which has been linked to Mr.

Bryant for almost two decades and helped popularize his “Black Mamba” nickname, cited his “immeasurable impact” and made no mention of a recently updated sneaker design called Kobe V Protro Chaos.

Adidas, which sponsored Mr. Bryant when he was a teenager and produced shoes in his name, described him as “a true legend.” The BodyArmor sports-drink maker said Mr. Bryant, a significant investor in the company, was “an incredible friend.”

McDonald’s, which let a sponsorship deal with Mr.

Bryant expire after he was accused of sexually assaulting a lady in 2003, posted a message “honoring his greatness” on a corporate account devoted to McDonald’s All-American Games, a high school basketball tournament.

Sprite, which stopped running ads featuring Mr. Bryant after the 2003 accusation, did not publicly comment on his death. (The criminal case against Mr. Bryant was dropped in 2005. He settled with his accuser, and the terms of the settlement were not disclosed.)

IF you hold hearing the expression "snowflake" being used to describe groups of outraged users or protesters, you are not alone.

But if every this talk is a little bit confusing, here's everything you need to know about the strange term — including where it came from and who it often refers to.


What are the origins of the term snowflake?

The expression has become so favorite it was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in January 2018.

The experts tell snowflake is "now used as an insult to describe someone who is ‘overly sensitive or as feeling entitled to special treatment or consideration’.

"The expression in fact once had positive connotations and was used to describe children with a unique personality and potential."

"Snowflake" first became favorite as an insult in the US after the release of 1996 Brad Pitt film Fight Club.

One of the prominent lines, "You are not special.

You are not a beautiful and unique snowflake," clearly struck a chord and the phrase took off.

Chuck Palahniuk, who wrote the cult book the film was based on, has claimed he invented the term.

The author told the Evening Standard it "does come from Fight Club", adding it resonates even more two decades on.

He said: “There is a helpful of new Victorianism.

“Every generation gets offended by diverse things but my friends who teach in high school tell me that their students are extremely easily offended.”

America's Miriam-Webster dictionary reckons snowflake has been used as an insult for almost 150 years, but with a diverse meaning.

It says: "In the 1970s snowflake was a disparaging term for a white man or for a black man who was seen as acting white.

It was also used as a slang term for cocaine.

"But before either of those it was used for a time with a extremely specific political meaning. In Missouri in the early 1860s, a snowflake was a person who was opposed to the abolition of slavery — the implication of the name being that such people valued white people over black people.

"The snowflakes hoped slavery would survive the country's civil war, and were contrasted with two other groups."

Meanwhile, the use of "Generation Snowflake" is often traced back to Claire Fox and her book, I Discover That Offensive.


What does 'snowflake' mean?

Other than frozen rain, a "snowflake" is a term used to describe an overly sensitive person who thinks the world revolves around them.

Snowflakes gasp in horror when they hear an opinion they don't love, and believe they own a correct to be protected from anything unpalatable.

Today's generation of sensitive uni students are often labelled snowflakes because they get "trigger warnings" on books and lectures that might contain upsetting subjects.

Snowflake youngsters were horrified at un-PC jokes in the 90s sitcom Friends, which they saw for the first time when it was released on Netflix.

The term was also used when people began complaining about ancient James Bond films starring Sean Connery.

The name comes from the phrase "special snowflake", meaning somebody who is self-obsessed and fragile, easily offended, or unable to deal with opposing opinions.

It became favorite in 2016 when some older generations scoffed at young people's "hysterical" reaction to the EU referendum result.


Main allergy symptoms

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  2. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  3. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  4. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  5. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  6. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something. They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.


RELATED VIDEO: