What is a hymenoptera allergy

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Hymenoptera venom allergy is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction following a honeybee, vespid, or ant sting. Systemic-allergic sting reactions own been reported in up to % of adults and up to % of children. They can be mild and restricted to the skin or moderate to severe with a risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis.

Patients should carry an emergency kit containing an adrenaline autoinjector, H1 -antihistamines, and corticosteroids depending on the severity of their previous sting reaction(s). The only treatment to prevent further systemic sting reactions is venom immunotherapy. This guideline has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology’s (EAACI) Taskforce on Venom Immunotherapy as part of the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy initiative. The guideline aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of venom immunotherapy, has been informed by a formal systematic review and meta-analysis and produced using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) approach.

What is a hymenoptera allergy

The process included representation from a range of stakeholders. Venom immunotherapy is indicated in venom-allergic children and adults to prevent further moderate-to-severe systemic sting reactions. Venom immunotherapy is also recommended in adults with only generalized skin reactions as it results in significant improvements in quality of life compared to carrying an adrenaline autoinjector. This guideline aims to give practical advice on performing venom immunotherapy. Key sections cover general considerations before initiating venom immunotherapy, evidence-based clinical recommendations, risk factors for adverse events and for relapse of systemic sting reaction, and a summary of gaps in the evidence.

© EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S.

Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

PMID:

Funding information

This work was supported by:

  1. Medical Research Council, United Kingdom

    Grant ID: G

Sturm, G. J., Varga, E. M., Roberts, G., Mosbech, H., Bilò, M. B., Akdis, C. A., Muraro, A. (). EAACI guidelines on allergen immunotherapy: Hymenoptera venom allergy. Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 73(4),

Sturm, GJ, Varga, EM, Roberts, G, Mosbech, H, Bilò, MB, Akdis, CA, Antolín-Amérigo, D, Cichocka-Jarosz, E, Gawlik, R, Jakob, T, Kosnik, M, Lange, J, Mingomataj, E, Mitsias, DI, Ollert, M, Oude Elberink, JNG, Pfaar, O, Pitsios, C, Pravettoni, V, Ruëff, F, Sin, BA, Agache, I, Angier, E, Arasi, S, Calderón, MA, Fernandez-Rivas, M, Halken, S, Jutel, M, Lau, S, Pajno, GB, van Ree, R, Ryan, D, Spranger, O, van Wijk, RG, Dhami, S, Zaman, H, Sheikh, A & Muraro, A , ‘EAACI guidelines on allergen immunotherapy: Hymenoptera venom allergy’, Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol.

73, no. 4, pp.

Sturm, G. J. ; Varga, E. M. ; Roberts, G. ; Mosbech, H. ; Bilò, M. B. ; Akdis, C. A. ; Antolín-Amérigo, D. ; Cichocka-Jarosz, E. ; Gawlik, R. ; Jakob, T. ; Kosnik, M. ; Lange, J. ; Mingomataj, E.

What is a hymenoptera allergy

; Mitsias, D. I. ; Ollert, M. ; Oude Elberink, J. N.G. ; Pfaar, O. ; Pitsios, C. ; Pravettoni, V. ; Ruëff, F. ; Sin, B. A. ; Agache, I. ; Angier, E. ; Arasi, S. ; Calderón, M. A. ; Fernandez-Rivas, M. ; Halken, S. ; Jutel, M. ; Lau, S. ; Pajno, G.

What is a hymenoptera allergy

B. ; van Ree, R. ; Ryan, D. ; Spranger, O. ; van Wijk, R. G. ; Dhami, S. ; Zaman, H.

What is a hymenoptera allergy

; Sheikh, A. ; Muraro, A. / EAACI guidelines on allergen immunotherapy : Hymenoptera venom allergy. In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. ; Vol. 73, No. 4. pp.

EAACI guidelines on allergen immunotherapy : Hymenoptera venom allergy. / Sturm, G. J.; Varga, E. M.; Roberts, G.; Mosbech, H.; Bilò, M. B.; Akdis, C. A.; Antolín-Amérigo, D.; Cichocka-Jarosz, E.; Gawlik, R.; Jakob, T.; Kosnik, M.; Lange, J.; Mingomataj, E.; Mitsias, D.

I.; Ollert, M.; Oude Elberink, J. N.G.; Pfaar, O.; Pitsios, C.; Pravettoni, V.; Ruëff, F.; Sin, B. A.; Agache, I.; Angier, E.; Arasi, S.; Calderón, M. A.; Fernandez-Rivas, M.; Halken, S.; Jutel, M.; Lau, S.; Pajno, G. B.; van Ree, R.; Ryan, D.; Spranger, O.; van Wijk, R. G.; Dhami, S.; Zaman, H.; Sheikh, A.; Muraro, A.

In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 73, No. 4, , p.

Research output: Contribution to journal › Article

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Systemic-allergic sting reactions own been reported in up to {\%} of adults and up to {\%} of children. They can be mild and restricted to the skin or moderate to severe with a risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis. Patients should carry an emergency kit containing an adrenaline autoinjector, H1-antihistamines, and corticosteroids depending on the severity of their previous sting reaction(s). The only treatment to prevent further systemic sting reactions is venom immunotherapy. This guideline has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology’s (EAACI) Taskforce on Venom Immunotherapy as part of the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy initiative.

The guideline aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of venom immunotherapy, has been informed by a formal systematic review and meta-analysis and produced using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) approach. The process included representation from a range of stakeholders. Venom immunotherapy is indicated in venom-allergic children and adults to prevent further moderate-to-severe systemic sting reactions. Venom immunotherapy is also recommended in adults with only generalized skin reactions as it results in significant improvements in quality of life compared to carrying an adrenaline autoinjector.

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What is a hymenoptera allergy

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Patients should carry an emergency kit containing an adrenaline autoinjector, H1-antihistamines, and corticosteroids depending on the severity of their previous sting reaction(s). The only treatment to prevent further systemic sting reactions is venom immunotherapy. This guideline has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology’s (EAACI) Taskforce on Venom Immunotherapy as part of the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy initiative. The guideline aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of venom immunotherapy, has been informed by a formal systematic review and meta-analysis and produced using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) approach.

The process included representation from a range of stakeholders. Venom immunotherapy is indicated in venom-allergic children and adults to prevent further moderate-to-severe systemic sting reactions. Venom immunotherapy is also recommended in adults with only generalized skin reactions as it results in significant improvements in quality of life compared to carrying an adrenaline autoinjector. This guideline aims to give practical advice on performing venom immunotherapy.

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The only treatment to prevent further systemic sting reactions is venom immunotherapy. This guideline has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology’s (EAACI) Taskforce on Venom Immunotherapy as part of the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy initiative. The guideline aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of venom immunotherapy, has been informed by a formal systematic review and meta-analysis and produced using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) approach. The process included representation from a range of stakeholders.

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Part Descriptions

LP Bombus terrestris
Bombus terrestris, the Buff-tailed Bumblebee or Large Ground Bumblebee is one of the most numerous bumblebee species in Europe.

What is a hymenoptera allergy

The queen is 2– cm endless, while the workers are 1½–2 cm. The latter are characterized by their white-ended abdomens and glance (apart from their yellowish bands being darker in direct comparison) just love those of the White-tailed Bumblebee (B. lucorum), a shut relative.

What is a hymenoptera allergy

The queens of B. terrestris own the namesake buff-white abdomen («tail») tip; this area is white love in the workers in B. lucorum. Copyright Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License. See for details.Source: Wikipedia, Wikipedia

LP Bombus terrestris
Other species of Bumble bee include Bombus impatiens, B. occidentalis, B. canariensis and Bombus pennsylvanicus (American Bumble Bee).

An insect, which may result in allergy symptoms in sensitised individuals.

Hymenoptera venom allergy is a common problem in numerous parts of the world.

It is most commonly caused by members of the families Apidae (Bumble bees, Honey bees), Vespidae (Wasps, Yellow hornets, Hornets) and Myrmicidae (ants). Hymenoptera stings account for more deaths in the United States than any other venom. Although allergic reactions to Honey bee stings are common, allergy to Bumble bee venom is an unusual form of Hymenoptera venom allergy. Copyright Copyright © Phadia AB.Source: ImmunoCap, ImmunoCap

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