What is a doctor of allergies called

Symptoms of seasonal allergies range from mild to severe. The most common include:

Less common symptoms include:

Many people with hay fever also own asthma. If you own both hay fever and asthma, your seasonal allergens may trigger an asthma attack.


Diagnosing seasonal allergies

Hay fever is generally easier to diagnose than other allergies. If you own allergic symptoms that only happen at certain times of the year, it’s a sign that you own seasonal allergic rhinitis. Your doctor may also check your ears, nose, and throat to make a diagnosis.

Allergy testing generally isn’t necessary.

Your treatment for allergic rhinitis will likely be the same, no matter what type of allergen you react to.


Treating seasonal allergies

The best medicine for hay fever and year-round allergic rhinitis is avoidance of allergens that trigger symptoms for you. Medications are also available to treat symptoms of hay fever. Some people also attempt alternative treatments.

Medication

When you can’t avoid your allergens, other treatments are available, including:

In severe cases, your doctor may recommend allergy shots. They’re a type of immunotherapy that can assist desensitize your immune system to allergens.

Some allergy medications may own unwanted side effects, such as drowsiness, dizziness, and confusion.

Shop for over-the-counter decongestants and antihistamines online.

Avoidance

Take steps to avoid seasonal allergens.

For instance, use an air conditioner with a HEPA filter to cool your home in summer, rather than ceiling fans. Check your local weather network for pollen forecasts, and attempt to stay indoors when pollen counts are high. At times of year when your hay fever is active:

  1. keep your windows shut
  2. limit your time outdoors
  3. consider wearing a dust mask when you’re exterior, especially on windy days

It’s also significant to avoid cigarette smoke, which can aggravate hay fever symptoms.

Alternative treatments

Few studies own been done on alternative treatments for hay fever.

Some people believe the following alternative treatments may provide relief:

  1. quercetin, a flavonoid that gives fruits and vegetables color
  2. spirulina, a type of blue-green algae
  3. Lactobacillus acidophilus, the “friendly” bacteria found in yogurt
  4. vitamin C, which has some antihistamine properties

More research is needed to study if these alternative treatments are effective.


Causes of seasonal allergies

Hay fever happens when your immune system identifies an airborne substance that’s generally harmless as dangerous.

It responds to that substance, or allergen, by releasing histamines and other chemicals into your bloodstream. Those chemicals produce the symptoms of an allergic reaction.

Common triggers of hay fever vary from one season to another.

Fall

Autumn is ragweed season. The genus name for ragweed is Ambrosia, and it includes more than 40 species worldwide. Most of them grow in temperate regions of North and South America. They’re invasive plants that are hard to control.

What is a doctor of allergies called

Their pollen is a extremely common allergen, and the symptoms of ragweed allergy can be especially severe.

Other plants that drop their pollen in the drop include nettles, mugworts, sorrels, fat hens, and plantains.

Spring

Trees are responsible for most springtime seasonal allergies. Birch is one of the most common offenders in northern latitudes, where numerous people with hay fever react to its pollen. Other allergenic trees in North America include cedar, alder, horse chestnut, willow, and poplar.

Summer

Hay fever gets its name from hay-cutting season, which is traditionally in the summer months.

But the genuine culprits of summertime seasonal allergies are grasses, such as ryegrass and timothy grass, as well as certain weeds. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, grasses are the most common trigger for people with hay fever.

Winter

By winter, most outdoor allergens lie dormant. As a result, freezing weather brings relief to numerous people with hay fever. But it also means that more folks are spending time indoors.

If you’re prone to seasonal allergies, you may also react to indoor allergens, such as mold, pet dander, dust mites, or cockroaches.

Indoor allergens are often easier to remove from your environment than outdoor pollens. Here are a few tips for ridding your home of common allergens:

  1. Cover your bedding and pillows with allergen-proof covers.
  2. Fix water leaks and clean up water damage that can assist mold and pests flourish.
  3. Clean moldy surfaces and any places that mold may form, including humidifiers, swamp coolers, air conditioners, and refrigerators.
  4. Get rid of carpets and upholstered furniture.
  5. Remove stuffed toys from your children’s bedrooms.
  6. Wash your bedding in extremely boiling water at least once a week.
  7. Use a dehumidifier to reduce excess moisture.


The takeaway

The symptoms of seasonal allergies can be uncomfortable.

If you suspect you own seasonal allergies, talk to your doctor. They can assist diagnose the cause of your symptoms and prescribe a treatment plan. They will likely urge you to take steps to avoid your allergy triggers. They may also recommend over-the-counter or prescription medications.

At Carolina Asthma & Allergy Middle, we’re committed to providing the highest quality asthma and allergy care in North and South Carolina.

What is a doctor of allergies called

To better serve both states, our Rock Hill location is located near the South Carolina border, making it easily accessible to South Carolina residents in Rock Hill, Fort Mill, and Lake Wylie as well as North Carolina areas such as Pineville.

We own five medical experts on hand at our Rock Hill office, including Natasha Laungani, FNP-C; S. Nicole Chadha, MD; Roopen R. Patel, MD; Susan I. Hungness, MD; and Glenn W. Errington, MD. Dr. Laungani, who is exclusive to our Rock Hill location, studied at the University of Kentucky and the University of Cincinnati.

Dr. Errington specializes in children over two years ancient and adults. He received certifications through the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.

You’ll discover our shot room at our Rock Hill office as well, which is open until 4:30 p.m. on weekdays. This is for our allergy patients dealing with skin allergies, food allergies, insect allergies, and more. Our patients who need allergy treatment or asthma treatment can set up an appointment for any day of the week until 5 p.m. with one of our specialists. The phone number for our Carolina Asthma & Allergy Middle, including our Rock Hill office, is 704-372-7900.

Is FPIES A Lifelong Condition?

Typically, no.

Numerous children outgrow FPIES by about age three. Note, however, that the time varies per individual and the offending food, so statistics are a guide, but not an absolute. In one study, 100% of children with FPIES reactions to barley had outgrown and were tolerating barley by age three. However, only 40% of those with FPIES to rice, and 60% to dairy tolerated it by the same age.

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Does FPIES Require Epinephrine?

Not generally, because epinephrine reverses IgE-mediated symptoms, and FPIES is not IgE-mediated. Based on the patient’s history, some doctors might prescribe epinephrine to reverse specific symptoms of shock (e.g., low blood pressure).

However, this is only prescribed in specific cases.

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Please note: Due to healthcare privacy laws, we cannot answer any questions pertaining to personal health information by e-mail.

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Rahimi graduated from the UniversidadIberoamericana. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine at the Illinois MasonicMedical Middle in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Rahimi went on to finish a two-year fellowshipspecializing in Allergy and Immunology at the Louisiana State University in New Orleans, LA. Dr.Rahimi is a resident of the Northern Dallas areaandis board certified in Internal Medicine andAllergy Immunology. He has been helping patients feel better for over 10 years.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

When Do FPIES Reactions Occur?

FPIES reactions often show up in the first weeks or months of life, or at an older age for the exclusively breastfed kid. Reactions generally happen upon introducing first solid foods, such as baby cereals or formulas, which are typically made with dairy or soy.

(Infant formulas are considered solids for FPIES purposes.) While a kid may own allergies and intolerances to food proteins they are exposed to through breastmilk, FPIES reactions generally don’t happen from breastmilk, regardless of the mother’s diet. An FPIES reaction typically takes put when the kid has directly ingested the trigger food(s).

How Do You Care for a Kid With FPIES?

Treatment varies, depending on the patient and his/her specific reactions.

Often, infants who own reacted to both dairy and soy formulas will be placed on hypoallergenic or elemental formula. Some children do well breastfeeding. Other children who own fewer triggers may just strictly avoid the offending food(s).

New foods are generally introduced extremely slowly, one food at a time, for an extended period of time per food. Some doctors recommend trialing a single food for up to three weeks before introducing another.

Because it’s a rare, but serious condition, in the event of an emergency, it is vital to get the correct treatment.

Some doctors provide their patients with a letter containing a brief description of FPIES and its proper treatment. In the event of a reaction, this letter can be taken to the ER with the child.

How is FPIES Diagnosed?

FPIES is hard to diagnose, unless the reaction has happened more than once, as it is diagnosed by symptom presentation. Typically, foods that trigger FPIES reactions are negative with standard skin and blood allergy tests (SPT, RAST) because they glance for IgE-mediated responses. However, as stated before, FPIES is not IgE-mediated.

Atopy patch testing (APT) is being studied for its effectiveness in diagnosing FPIES, as well as predicting if the problem food is no longer a trigger.

Thus, the outcome of APT may determine if the kid is a potential candidate for an oral food challenge (OFC). APT involves placing the trigger food in a metal cap, which is left on the skin for 48 hours. The skin is then watched for symptoms in the following days after removal. Please consult your child’s doctor to discuss if APT is indicated in your situation.

What is a Typical FPIES Reaction?

As with every things, each kid is diverse, and the range, severity and duration of symptoms may vary from reaction to reaction. Unlike traditional IgE-mediated allergies, FPIES reactions do not manifest with itching, hives, swelling, coughing or wheezing, etc.

What is a doctor of allergies called

Symptoms typically only involve the gastrointestinal system, and other body organs are not involved. FPIES reactions almost always start with delayed onset vomiting (usually two hours after ingestion, sometimes as tardy as eight hours after). Symptoms can range from mild (an increase in reflux and several days of runny stools) to life threatening (shock). In severe cases, after repeatedly vomiting, children often start vomiting bile.

Commonly, diarrhea follows and can final up to several days. In the worst reactions (about 20% of the time), the kid has such severe vomiting and diarrhea that s/he rapidly becomes seriously dehydrated and may go into shock.

How Do You Treat an FPIES Reaction?

Always follow your doctor’s emergency plan pertaining to your specific situation. Rapid dehydration and shock are medical emergencies.

What is a doctor of allergies called

If your kid is experiencing symptoms of FPIES or shock, immediately contact your local emergency services (9-1-1). If you are uncertain if your kid is in need of emergency services, contact 9-1-1 or your physician for guidance. The most critical treatment during an FPIES reaction is intravenous (IV) fluids, because of the risk and prevalence of dehydration. Children experiencing more severe symptoms may also need steroids and in-hospital monitoring.

Mild reactions may be capable to be treated at home with oral electrolyte re-hydration (e.g., Pedialyte®).

What is FPIES?

FPIES is a non-IgE mediated immune reaction in the gastrointestinal system to one or more specific foods, commonly characterized by profuse vomiting and diarrhea. FPIES is presumed to be cell mediated. Poor growth may happen with continual ingestion. Upon removing the problem food(s), every FPIES symptoms subside. (Note: Having FPIES does not preclude one from having other allergies/intolerances with the food.) The most common FPIES triggers are cow’s milk (dairy) and soy.

However, any food can cause an FPIES reaction, even those not commonly considered allergens, such as rice, oat and barley.

A kid with FPIES may experience what appears to be a severe stomach bug, but the «bug» only starts a couple hours after the offending food is given. Numerous FPIES parents own rushed their children to the ER, limp from extreme, repeated projectile vomiting, only to be told, «It’s the stomach flu.» However, the next time they feed their children the same solids, the dramatic symptoms return.

How Do I know If My Kid Has Outgrown FPIES?

Together with your child’s doctor, you should determine if/when it is likely that your kid may own outgrown any triggers.

Obviously, determining if a kid has outgrown a trigger is something that needs to be evaluated on a food-by-food basis. As stated earlier, APT testing may be an option to assess oral challenge readiness. Another factor for you and your doctor to consider is if your kid would physically be capable to handle a possible failed challenge.

When the time comes to orally challenge an FPIES trigger, most doctors familiar with FPIES will desire to schedule an in-office food challenge.

What is a doctor of allergies called

Some doctors (especially those not practicing in a hospital clinic setting) may select to challenge in the hospital, with an IV already in put, in case of emergency. Each doctor may own his or her own protocol, but an FPIES trigger is something you should definitely NOT challenge without discussing thoroughly with your doctor.

Be aware that if a kid passes the in-office portion of the challenge, it does not mean this food is automatically guaranteed «safe.» If a child’s delay in reaction is fairly short, a kid may fail an FPIES food challenge while still at the office/hospital. For those with longer reaction times, it may not be until later that day that symptoms manifest.

Some may react up to three days later. Delay times may vary by food as well. If a kid has FPIES to multiple foods, one food may trigger symptoms within four hours; a diverse food may not trigger symptoms until six or eight hours after ingestion.

What is Shock and What are the Symptoms?

Shock is a life-threatening condition. Shock may develop as the result of sudden illness, injury, or bleeding. When the body cannot get enough blood to the vital organs, it goes into shock.

Signs of shock include:
Weakness, dizziness, and fainting.
Cool, pale, clammy skin.
Weak, quick pulse.
Shallow, quick breathing.
Low blood pressure.
Extreme thirst, nausea, or vomiting.
Confusion or anxiety.

What Does IgE vs Cell Mediated Mean?

IgE stands for Immunoglobulin E.

It is a type of antibody, formed to protect the body from infection, that functions in allergic reactions. IgE-mediated reactions are considered immediate hypersensitivity immune system reactions, while cell mediated reactions are considered delayed hypersensitivity. Antibodies are not involved in cell mediated reactions. For the purpose of understanding FPIES, you can disregard every you know about IgE-mediated reactions.

What are Some Common FPIES Triggers?

The most common FPIES triggers are traditional first foods, such as dairy and soy.

Other common triggers are rice, oat, barley, green beans, peas, sweet potatoes, squash, chicken and turkey. A reaction to one common food does not mean that every of the common foods will be an issue, but patients are often advised to proceed with caution with those foods.

What is a doctor of allergies called

Note that while the above foods are the most prevalent, they are not exclusive triggers. Any food has the potential to trigger an FPIES reaction. Even trace amounts can cause a reaction.

What Does FPIES Stand For?

FPIES is Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome. It is commonly pronounced «F-Pies», as in «apple pies», though some physicians may refer to it as FIES (pronounced «fees», considering food-protein as one word). Enterocolitis is inflammation involving both the little intestine and the colon (large intestine).

How is FPIES Diverse From MSPI, MSPIES, MPIES, Etc.?

MPIES (milk-protein induced enterocolitis syndrome) is FPIES to cow’s milk only.

MSPIES (milk- and soy-protein induced enterocolitis syndrome) is FPIES to milk and soy. Some doctors do create these subdivisions, while others declare that milk and soy are simply the two most common FPIES triggers and give the diagnosis of «FPIES to milk and/or soy.»

MSPI is milk and soy protein intolerance. Symptoms are those of allergic colitis and can include colic, vomiting, diarrhea and blood in stools. These reactions are not as severe or immediate as an FPIES reaction.

References

Fogg MI, Brown-Whitehorn TA, Pawlowski NA, Spergel JM.

(2006). Atopy Patch Test for the Diagnosis of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 17: 351–355. Retrieved on December 31, 2007 from http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/120/Supplement_3/S116.

Burks, AW. (2006). Don’t Feed Her That! Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Food Allergy. Pediatric Basics. Gerber Products Company: 115. Retrieved on December 31, 2007 from http://www.gerber.com/content/usa/html/pages/pediatricbasics/articles/115_01-dontfeed.html.

Moore, D.

Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome. (2007, April 11). Retrieved on December 31, 2007 from http://allergies.about.com/od/foodallergies/a/fpies.htm.

Sicherer, SH. (2005). Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome: Case Presentations and Management Lessons. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Vol. 115, 1:149-156. Retrieved on December 31, 2007 from http://www.jacionline.org/article/PIIS0091674904024881/fulltext.

Nowak-Wegrzyn, A., Sampson, HA, Wood, RA, Sicherer, SH. MD, Robert A. Wood, MD and Scott H. Sicherer, MD. (2003). Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome Caused by Solid Food Proteins. Pediatrics. Vol. 111. 4: 829-835. Retrieved on December 31, 2007 from http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/111/4/829#T1.

Nocerino, A., Guandalini, S.

(2006, April 11). Protein Intolerance. Retrieved on December 31, 2007 from http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic1908.htm. WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise.

What is a doctor of allergies called

(2006, May 31). Shock, Topic Overview. Retrieved on December 31, 2007 from http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/shock-topic-overview.

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. (2007). Tips to Remember: What is an Allergic Reaction? Retrieved on December 31, 2007 from http://www.aaaai.org/patients/publicedmat/tips/whatisallergicreaction.stm.

Sicherer, SH. (2006). Understanding and Managing Your Child’s Food Allergies. A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book. 336.

Medical Review February 2008.

Manuel S.

Villareal, M.D.

Dr. Manuel Villareal practices Internal Medicine as an Allergist and Immunologist. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Allergy & Immunology and American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM); a Certified Physician Investigator and ABIM Geriatric Medicine specialist; and a Fellow of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. He graduated cum laude from De La Salle University School of Medicine in the Philippines. He completed his Internal Medicine Residency at St. Peter’s Medical Middle, where he served as Chief Resident, and his fellowship training in Allergy & Immunology and Geriatric Medicine at UCLA — West Los Angeles VA Medical Center.

Along with treating Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati patients at Fragge Allergy & Asthma Clinics since 1994, Dr.

Villareal is athletic in academic clinical research; teaching medical students, residents and fellows; and several clinical drug trials on breakthrough treatments and therapies. He is an Affiliate Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine and Faculty at St. Elizabeth Medical Center’s Family Medicine Residency Program. He also collaborates with the UC Department of Environmental Health and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center’s Division of Allergy & Immunology. He has published over 30 peer-reviewed articles in major medical journals.

Dr. Villareal joined ENT & Allergy Specialists in October 2015, furthering our commitment to providing the best possible ENT, allergy and hearing healthcare to our community.

We are excited to welcome Dr. Villareal to the ENT & Allergy Specialists team, Northern Kentucky’s trusted healthcare professionals since 1977. Dr. Villareal is on medical staff at St. Elizabeth, Highpoint Health and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Villareal was named one of CINCINNATI MAGAZINE’S TOP DOCTORS for Allergy & Immunology in January 2015, marking his fifth consecutive year on this prestigious list of top healthcare providers!


Overview

An allergy (allergic rhinitis) that occurs in a specific season is more commonly known as hay fever. About 8 percent of Americans experience it, reports the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Hay fever occurs when your immune system overreacts to an outdoor allergen, such as pollen.

An allergen is something that triggers an allergic response. The most common allergens are pollens from wind-pollenated plants, such as trees, grasses, and weeds. The pollens from insect-pollinated plants are too heavy to remain airborne for endless, and they’re less likely to trigger an allergic reaction.

Hay fever comes by its name from hay-cutting season. Historically, this activity occurred in the summer months, around the same time numerous people experienced symptoms.

Seasonal allergies are less common during the winter, but it’s possible to experience allergic rhinitis year-round. Diverse plants emit their respective pollens at diverse times of year.

Depending on your allergy triggers and where you live, you may experience hay fever in more than one season. You may also react to indoor allergens, such as mold or pet dander.


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