What is a animal allergy

The symptoms of an allergic reaction can vary from mild to severe. If you become exposed to an allergen for the first time, your symptoms may be mild. These symptoms may get worse if you repeatedly come into contact with the allergen.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  1. itching
  2. rash
  3. scratchy throat
  4. hives (itchy red spots on the skin)
  5. nasal congestion (known as rhinitis)
  6. watery or itchy eyes

Severe allergic reactions can cause the following symptoms:

  1. difficulty swallowing
  2. heart palpitations
  3. weakness
  4. diarrhea
  5. swelling of the face, eyes, or tongue
  6. nausea or vomiting
  7. wheezing
  8. difficulty breathing
  9. fear or anxiety
  10. abdominal cramping or pain
  11. flushing of the face
  12. dizziness (vertigo)
  13. pain or tightness in the chest
  14. unconsciousness

A severe and sudden allergic reaction can develop within seconds after exposure to an allergen.

This type of reaction is known as anaphylaxis and results in life-threatening symptoms, including swelling of the airway, inability to breathe, and a sudden and severe drop in blood pressure.

If you experience this type of allergic reaction, seek immediate emergency assist. Without treatment, this condition can result in death within 15 minutes.



Melting temperature (10°C/min)

255

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Temp. of deflection under load (1.80 MPa)

220

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ISO 75-1/-2

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of deflection under load (0.45 MPa)

240

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ISO 75-1/-2

Coeff. of linear therm.

What is a animal allergy

expansion (parallel)

0.2

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ISO 11359-1/-2

Coeff. of linear therm. expansion (normal)

0.65

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ISO 11359-1/-2

Burning Behav. at 1.5 mm nom. thickn.

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class

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1.5

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Burning Behav. at thickness h

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0.71

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36

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Relative Temperature Index — electrical

150

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RTI electrical (Thickness (1) tested)

0.71

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Relative Temperature Index — electrical

150

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RTI electrical (Thickness (2) tested)

3

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Relative Temperature Index — with impact

125

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RTI with impact (Thickness (1) tested)

0.71

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Relative Temperature Index — with impact

130

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RTI with impact (Thickness (2) tested)

3

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Relative Temperature Index — without impact

140

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0.71

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Relative Temperature Index — without impact

140

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3

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About Dr.

John R. Gordon

Dr. John Gordon received his PhD in immunopathology from the University of Saskatchewan in 1984.  He did post-doctoral fellowships at the National Institute for Medical Research at Mill Hill, UK (1984-87) and the Department of Pathology at Harvard Medical School (1987-88), then worked as an Instructor in the Department of Pathology at the latter institution (1988-91).  He returned to the University of Saskatchewan in 1991 as an Associate Professor in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology.  In 2007 he moved to the Department of Medicine as the Director of the Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture (2007-12), after which he served as Acting Associate Dean Research for the College of Medicine (2012-13).  He is presently a Professor in the Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine.

Dr.

Gordon’s laboratory focus is immunotherapeutics in the context of allergic and other inflammatory diseases.  They own developed regulatory dendritic cell protocols to reverse asthma and food allergen sensitivity in animal models and own shown that these approaches are relevant also to human disease.  They are presently moving to translate regulatory dendritic cell immunotherapies into the clinic.

Their lab also patented a series of anti-inflammatory drugs that attenuate neutrophilic inflammation in an array of animal models, but they own more recently shown that these same agents potently antagonize the growth, metastasis and development of chemotherapeutic resistance in multiple tumours.  Dr. Gordon’s lab has been funded for >25 years by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), but is also funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada, the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CCFF), the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF) and AllerGen NCE.

Dr.

Gordon devotes considerable time and energy to mentoring trainees within his own laboratory. He was also a co-Leader of the SHRF Airways Research Group and the Scientific Director of a multinational CIHR Strategic Training Program in Health Research.  He is the Vice-president of the Canadian Society for Immunology, and has served on the Boards, management or review committees of the Gairdner Foundation, AllerGen NCE and the CIHR Immunol & Transplantation grant panel among others. 

Current Position:

  1. Professor, Division of Respirology, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.

    What is a animal allergy

    2007-present

Education

  1. PhD, University of Saskatchewan, 1984 (Immunopathology)
  2. B.Sc., University of Saskatchewan, 1977 (Zoology)

Appointments/Training

  1. Head, Division of Occupational & Rural Health, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. 2007-12
  2. Visiting Professor, Pulmonary Research Group, University of Alberta. Jan-June, 2003
  3. Instructor in Pathology, Dept Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

    1988-91

  4. Acting Associate Dean Research, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. 2012-13
  5. Associate Professor, Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan.

    What is a animal allergy

    1991-’97

  6. Professor, Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, 1997-2007
  7. Research Fellow, Dept. Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.  1987-88
  8. Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Agricultural Medicine, 2007-12
  9. Professor, Division of Respirology, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. 2007-Present
  10. Research Fellow, National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, U.K. 1984-87

Memberships in Professional Societies

  1. Canadian Society of Immunology, March, 1991-present
  2. American Association of Immunologists, 1987-present
  3. Society for Leukocyte Biology, 2004- (lapsed)
  4. Collegium Internationale Allergologicum, 2008-present
  5. Canadian Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2004-present

Honours, Awards, Distinctions (recent)

  1. Distinguished Researcher 2011, University of Saskatchewan.  May, 2011
  2. Elected to membership, Collegium Internationale Allergologicum.

    What is a animal allergy

    May, 2008 (global membership cap, 250)

  3.  ‘Innovator of the Year’ Award, Sask. Innovation Put, 2007 ($5,000)
  4. Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation Career Achievement Award, 2014
  5. Pfizer Animal Health Research Excellence Award, 2003 ($1,000)

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How this works.


Overview

Your immune system is responsible for defending the body against bacteria and viruses. In some cases, your immune system will defend against substances that typically don’t pose a threat to the human body. These substances are known as allergens, and when your body reacts to them, it causes an allergic reaction.

You can inhale, eat, and touch allergens that cause a reaction. Doctors can also use allergens to diagnose allergies and can even inject them into your body as a form of treatment.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) reports that as numerous as 50 million people in the United States suffer from some type of allergic disease.


How is an allergic reaction treated?

If you experience an allergic reaction and you don’t know what’s causing it, you may need to see your doctor to determine what the cause of your allergy is.

If you own a known allergy and experience symptoms, you may not need to seek medical care if your symptoms are mild.

In most cases, over-the-counter antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl), can be effective for controlling mild allergic reactions.

If you or someone you know experiences a severe allergic reaction, you should seek emergency medical attention.

What is a animal allergy

Check to see if the person is breathing, call 911, and provide CPR if needed.

People with known allergies often own emergency medications with them, such as an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen). Epinephrine is a “rescue drug” because it opens the airways and raises blood pressure. The person may need your assist to ister the medication. If the person is unconscious, you should:

  1. Lay them flat on their back.
  2. Elevate their legs.
  3. Cover them with a blanket.

This will assist prevent shock.

Shop over-the-counter antihistamines for controlling mild allergic reactions.


What causes an allergic reaction?

Doctors don’t know why some people experience allergies.

Allergies appear to run in families and can be inherited. If you own a shut family member who has allergies, you’re at greater risk for developing allergies.

Although the reasons why allergies develop aren’t known, there are some substances that commonly cause an allergic reaction. People who own allergies are typically allergic to one or more of the following:


How is an allergic reaction diagnosed?

Your doctor can diagnose allergic reactions. If you experience symptoms of an allergic reaction, your doctor will act out an exam and enquire you about your health history.

If your allergic reactions are severe, your doctor may enquire you to hold a journal that details your symptoms and the substances that appear to cause them.

Your doctor may desire to order tests to determine what’s causing your allergy. The most commonly ordered types of allergy tests are:

  1. skin tests
  2. challenge (elimination-type) tests
  3. blood tests

A skin test involves applying a little quantity of a suspected allergen to the skin and watching for a reaction.

The substance may be taped to the skin (patch test), applied via a little prick to the skin (skin prick test), or injected just under the skin (intradermal test).

What is a animal allergy

A skin test is most valuable for diagnosing:

Challenge testing is useful in diagnosing food allergies. It involves removing a food from your diet for several weeks and watching for symptoms when you eat the food again.

A blood test for an allergy checks your blood for antibodies against a possible allergen.

What is a animal allergy

An antibody is a protein your body produces to fight harmful substances. Blood tests are an option when skin testing isn’t helpful or possible.


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