What helps swollen allergy eyes

Common allergens include pollen, animal dander and mold.

Eye allergies also can be caused by reactions to certain cosmetics or eye drops, including artificial tears used for treating dry eyes that contain preservatives.

Food allergies and allergic reactions to bee stings or other insect bites typically do not affect the eyes as severely as airborne allergens do.


Eye allergies: Get relief from itchy, watery eyes

By Gary Heiting, OD

Eye allergies — red, itchy, watery eyes that are bothered by the same irritants that cause sneezing and a runny nose among seasonal allergy sufferers — are extremely common.

In addition to having symptoms of sneezing, congestion and a runny nose, most of these allergy sufferers also experience itchy eyes, watery eyes, red eyes and swollen eyelids.

In some cases, eye allergies also can frolic a role in conjunctivitis (pink eye) and other eye infections.

If you ponder you own eye allergies, here are a few things you should know — including helpful tips on how to get relief from your red, itchy, watery eyes.


Main allergy symptoms

Common symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  1. a raised, itchy, red rash (hives)
  2. tummy pain, feeling ill, vomiting or diarrhoea
  3. swollen lips, tongue, eyes or face
  4. wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and a cough
  5. itchy, red, watering eyes (conjunctivitis)
  6. sneezing and an itchy, runny or blocked nose (allergic rhinitis)
  7. dry, red and cracked skin

The symptoms vary depending on what you’re allergic to and how you come into contact with it.

For example, you may have a runny nose if exposed to pollen, develop a rash if you own a skin allergy, or feel sick if you eat something you’re allergic to.

See your GP if you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something. They can assist determine whether the symptoms are caused by an allergy or another condition.

Read more about diagnosing allergies.


How to avoid swollen eyelids

By Aimee Rodrigues; reviewed by Gary Heiting, OD

A swollen eyelid occurs when there is inflammation or excess fluid (edema) in the connective tissues surrounding the eye.

Swollen eyes may or may not be painful, and the condition can affect both the upper and lower eyelids.

There are numerous causes of a swollen eye, including eye infections, eye injuries or trauma, and (most commonly)

allergies

.

Swelling of the eyelids can be a sign of a more serious, potentially sight-threatening health problem, such as

orbital cellulitis

,

Graves' disease

and

ocular herpes

.

It's significant that you visit your eye doctor for a thorough eye exam if your symptoms persist, worsen or change.

FIND A DOCTOR: If you own just moved or it's been a while since your final exam, find an eye doctor near you.


Symptoms of swollen eyes

Swelling of the eyelids is a symptom of an underlying cause, such as allergy or infection. Swollen eyes generally are accompanied by one or more of the following:

A swollen eyelid may be a symptom of allergies or a sign of a serious eye infection.

  1. Redness of the eyelid
  2. Eyelid dryness or flaking
  3. Red eyes and inflammation of the conjunctiva
  4. Eye discharge
  5. Obstructed vision (depending on the extent of the swelling)
  6. Sensitivity to light (photophobia)
  7. Eye irritation, such as an itchy or scratchy sensation
  8. Excess tear production, resulting in watering eyes
  9. Pain, particularly when swollen eyelids are caused by infection

Puffy vs.

swollen eyes. The term "puffy eyes" often is interchangeable with "swollen eyes." Swollen eyes is generally used to describe an immune response to allergy, infection or injury, whereas "puffy eyes" is more likely used to refer to the external physical characteristic of swollen eyes from water retention, lack of sleep, or genetic traits love dark circles under the eyes.


Causes of swollen eyes

There are numerous causes of swollen eyelids — ranging from mild to potentially sight-threatening conditions.

Allergies: Eye allergies happen when your immune system overreacts to a foreign substance, called an allergen.

Pollen, dust, pet dander, certain eye drops and contact lens solutions are some of the most common eye allergens. An allergic reaction to makeup also is a known culprit of swollen eyes.

Eye allergies develop when your eyes release chemical "mediators" to protect your eyes from allergens to which you are sensitive.

The most common is histamine, which causes blood vessels in your eyes to dilate and swell, mucous membranes to itch and your eye to become red and watery.

Conjunctivitis: Also called "pink eye

en españolAlergia al pescado

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Fish Allergy?

When someone is allergic to fish, the body’s immune system, which normally fights infections, overreacts to proteins in the fish.

Every time the person eats (or, in some cases, handles or breathes in) fish, the body thinks these proteins are harmful invaders and releases chemicals love . This can cause symptoms such as:

  1. vomiting
  2. swelling
  3. itchy, watery, or swollen eyes
  4. hives
  5. red spots
  6. hoarseness
  7. trouble breathing
  8. throat tightness
  9. diarrhea
  10. coughing
  11. belly pain
  12. wheezing
  13. a drop in blood pressure, causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness (passing out)

Allergic reactions to fish can differ.

What helps swollen allergy eyes

Sometimes the same person can react differently at diverse times. Fish allergy can cause a severe reaction called anaphylaxis, even if a previous reaction was mild. Anaphylaxis might start with some of the same symptoms as a less severe reaction, but can quickly get worse. The person may own trouble breathing or pass out.

What helps swollen allergy eyes

More than one part of the body might be involved. If it isn’t treated, anaphylaxis can be life-threatening.

A kid who has a fish allergy must completely avoid eating fish. Sometimes an allergist can test for allergies to specific types of fish. Otherwise, it’s best for someone with a fish allergy to avoid every fish.

How Is an Allergic Reaction to Fish Treated?

If your kid has a fish allergy (or any helpful of serious food allergy), the doctor will desire him or her to carry an epinephrine auto-injector in case of an emergency.

An epinephrine auto-injector is a prescription medicine that comes in a little, easy-to-carry container.

It’s simple to use.

What helps swollen allergy eyes

Your doctor will show you how. Kids who are ancient enough can be taught how to give themselves the injection. If they carry the epinephrine, it should be nearby, not left in a locker or in the nurse’s office.

Wherever your kid is, caregivers should always know where the epinephrine is, own simple access to it, and know how to give the shot. Staff at your child’s school should know about the allergy and own an action plan in put. Your child’s medicines should be accessible at every times. Also consider having your kid wear a medical alert bracelet.

Every second counts in an allergic reaction. If your kid starts having serious allergic symptoms, love swelling of the mouth or throat or difficulty breathing, give the epinephrine auto-injector correct away.

Also give it correct away if the symptoms involve two diverse parts of the body, love hives with vomiting. Then call 911 and take your kid to the emergency room.

What helps swollen allergy eyes

Your kid needs to be under medical supervision because even if the worst seems to own passed, a second wave of serious symptoms can happen.

It’s also a excellent thought to carry an over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamine for your kid, as this can assist treat mild allergy symptoms. Use after — not as a replacement for — the epinephrine shot during life-threatening reactions.

What Is a Fish Allergy?

A fish allergy is not exactly the same as a seafood allergy.

Seafood includes fish (like tuna or cod) and shellfish (like lobster or clams). Even though they both drop into the category of "seafood," fish and shellfish are biologically diverse. So shellfish will only cause an allergic reaction in someone with a fish allergy if that person also has a shellfish allergy.

People with a fish allergy might be allergic to some types of fish but not others. Although most allergic reactions to fish happen when someone eats fish, sometimes people can react to touching fish or breathing in vapors from cooking fish.

Fish allergy can develop at any age.

Even people who own eaten fish in the past can develop an allergy.

What helps swollen allergy eyes

Some people outgrow certain food allergies over time. But those with fish allergies generally own that allergy for the relax of their lives.

What Else Should I Know?

If allergy testing shows that your kid has a fish allergy, the doctor will give you guidelines on keeping your kid safe. To prevent allergic reactions, your kid must not eat fish. Your kid also must not eat any foods that might contain fish as ingredients. Anyone who is sensitive to the smell of cooking fish should avoid restaurants and other areas where fish is being cooked.

For information on foods to avoid, check sites such as the Food Allergy Research and Education network (FARE).

Always read food labels to see if a food contains fish.

Manufacturers of foods sold in the United States must state whether foods contain any of the top eight most common allergens, including fish. The label should list "fish" in the ingredient list or tell "Contains fish" after the list.

Some foods glance OK from the ingredient list, but while being made they can come in contact with fish. This is called cross-contamination. Glance for advisory statements such as "May contain fish," "Processed in a facility that also processes fish," or "Manufactured on equipment also used for fish." Not every companies label for cross-contamination, so if in doubt, call or email the company to be sure.

Cross-contamination often happens in restaurants.

In kitchens, fish can get into a food product because the staff use the same surfaces, utensils (like knives, cutting boards, or pans), or oil to prepare both fish and other foods.

This is particularly common in seafood restaurants, so some people discover it safer to avoid these restaurants. Fish is also used in a lot of Asian cooking, so there’s a risk of cross-contamination in Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, or Japanese restaurants. When eating at restaurants, it may be best to avoid fried foods because numerous places cook chicken, French fries, and fish in the same oil.

When eating away from home, make certain you own an epinephrine auto-injector with you and that it hasn’t expired.

Also, tell the people preparing or serving your child’s food about the fish allergy. Sometimes, you may desire to bring food with you that you know is safe. Don’t eat at the restaurant if the chef, manager, or owner seems uncomfortable with your request for a safe meal.

Also talk to the staff at school about cross-contamination risks for foods in the cafeteria. It may be best to pack lunches at home so you can control what’s in them.

Other things to hold in mind:

  1. Don’t feed your kid cooked foods you didn’t make yourself or anything with unknown ingredients.
  2. Carry a personalized "chef card" for your kid, which can be given to the kitchen staff.

    The card details your child’s allergies for food preparers. Food allergy websites provide printable chef card forms in numerous diverse languages.

  3. Make certain the epinephrine auto-injector is always on hand and that it is not expired.
  4. Tell everyone who handles the food — from relatives to restaurant staff — that your kid has a fish allergy.

Conditions


Severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis)

In rare cases, an allergy can lead to a severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock, which can be life threatening.

This affects the whole body and usually develops within minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to.

Signs of anaphylaxis include any of the symptoms above, as well as:

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.

Read more about anaphylaxis for information about what to do if it occurs.

Sheet final reviewed: 22 November 2018
Next review due: 22 November 2021

Conditions


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