What dogs are good for allergies

What dogs are good for allergies

If you are allergic to your pet and your reactions aren’t life-threatening, there are numerous ways to reduce indoor allergens and allergy symptoms so you and your pet can live together more comfortably.

If your or a family member’s allergies are simply miserable, but not life-threatening, take these five steps to reduce the symptoms:

1. Create an «allergy free» zone in your home—preferably the allergic person’s bedroom—and strictly prohibit the pet’s access to it. Use a high-efficiency HEPA air cleaner, and consider using impermeable covers for the mattress and pillows.

2. Use HEPA air cleaners throughout the relax of the home, and avoid dust-and-dander-catching furnishings such as cloth curtains and blinds and carpeted floors.

Clean frequently and thoroughly to remove dust and dander, washing articles such as sofa covers and pillows, curtains, and pet beds.

3. Bathe your pet on a weekly basis to reduce the level of allergy-causing dander (shed ancient skin cells). Cats can get used to being bathed, but it’s critical to only use products labeled for them; kittens may need a shampoo safe for kittens. Check with your veterinarian’s staff or a excellent book on pet care for directions about safe bathing, It’s a excellent thought to use a shampoo recommended by your veterinarian or other animal care professional.

4.

Don’t be quick to blame the family pet for allergies. Enquire your allergist to specifically test for allergies to pet dander. Numerous allergy sufferers are sensitive to more than one allergen. Reduce the overall allergen level in your environment by concentrating on every of the causes, not just the pet allergy.

5. Attempt treatments. Additional treatments for allergies to pets are include immunotherapy (allergy shots), steroidal and antihistamine nose sprays and antihistamine pills. It is significant to discover an allergist who understands your commitment to living with your pet.

A combination of approaches—medical control of symptoms, excellent housecleaning methods, and immunotherapy—is most likely to succeed in allowing an allergic person to live with pets.


Sick as a Dog

For dogs, the most common clinical signs are skin inflammation and itching, Farnsworth says. Other symptoms may include sneezing and runny noses. (Take National Geographic’s dog quiz.)

Cats’ allergy symptoms can manifest as miliary dermatitis, which shows up as little scabs or missing hair, typically around the head and neck area, though it can happen elsewhere, she says.

It’s always significant to observe how endless symptoms happen in your pet—for instance, year-round symptoms may indicate a food allergy or reaction to something else in their environment that’s not seasonal.

Luckily, pets can be tested for a variety of environmental allergens—both seasonal and non-seasonal, saysChristine Cain,of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.

"We routinely test dogs for reactions to cat dander," she says.

"This includes a little quantity of allergen placed under the skin to test for reactions, just love in human allergy testing," Cain says.

Generally, veterinarians will glance for common allergens "like dust mites and human dander, or things we encounter in the environment love feathers, sheep wool, or pollens," says Washington State University’s Farnsworth.

Those are the usual suspects, but as with us, Farnsworth says, pets can be allergic to anything, and it can be hard to figure out the culprit with general testing.


It’s Not Me, It’s You

So what if your pet is allergic to you?

"It always makes owners helpful of unhappy if their reaction is to human dander," Cain says, but happily the two of you don’t own to part.

(See "Why Do We Get Allergies?")

"If we own a patient that reacts to human dander, generally they react to other allergens as well," she says.

That means your vet can treat the pet’s allergy, either with allergy shots or oral drops that contain little amounts of the problem allergens. This retrains your pet’s system to ignore the allergen.

Of course, the cat might always be faking an allergy in hopes you’ll get rid of the dog.

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Understand your pet allergies

It is significant to see a doctor and be tested to determine what allergies you actually own. You may discover that you’re allergic to something else and not your pet at all! For example, you may assume that you are allergic to your beloved dog, only to discover out through an allergy test that you’re actually allergic to a specific tree pollen that got on his fur during a stroll together, and that’s actually what’s bothering you.

If an allergy test shows that you are allergic to your pet, it is significant to understand what causes your allergic reaction to them.

There are allergy-triggering proteins called allergens in saliva and skin glands that cling to an animal’s dry skin (dander) and fur. The fur and dander then stick to walls, carpets and clothing.

The reaction of someone to these allergens is diverse from one person to the next. The reaction may range from mild sniffling and sneezing to life-threatening asthma. The reaction can be made worse if a person is additionally exposed to other things he is allergic too, such as pollen, dust mites, cigarette smoke, and mold.

Whether someone has an allergic reaction depends on both the individual person and the individual animal.

A person with animal allergies may react less to dogs with soft, constantly growing hair, or one specific cat or dog may cause more or less of an allergic reaction than another animal of that same breed.

You may hear claims about breeds of dogs and cats that are non-allergenic (don’t cause an allergic reaction) or cats and dogs that are hypoallergenic (cause less of an allergic reaction). However, even hairless breeds may cause a severe allergic reaction.


Be happy you didn’t let allergies break up a beautiful relationship

It is worth it to preserve the bond between you and your pet by checking if you are truly allergic to your pet and, if you are, to attempt these solutions.

Join the large number of animal lovers who manage their allergies and live happily and healthily with their beloved pets.

Children with eczema, a chronic skin condition that often begins in childhood, own a greater risk of developing asthma and food allergies.

What dogs are excellent for allergies

The number of children with eczema is rising, but the reasons for this are unclear. A new study soon to be published in The Journal of Pediatrics examines the relationship between pet ownership and eczema. Researchers found that dog ownership among children with dog allergies may reduce the risk of developing eczema by age 4 years; cat ownership, however, may increase the risk among children with cat allergies.

Dr. Tolly Epstein and colleagues from the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Middle gathered data from 636 children enrolled in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy & Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS), a long-term epidemiologic study examining the effects of environmental particulates on childhood respiratory health and allergy development.

Children enrolled in the study are considered at high risk for developing allergies because they were born to parents with allergies. The researchers focused on several potential risk factors for developing eczema, including dog and cat ownership. The children were tested for 17 separate allergies on a annually basis from ages 1 through 4 years, and the parents completed annually surveys.

The results provided exciting information regarding pet ownership. The researchers found that children who tested positive for dog allergies were less likely to develop eczema by age 4 years if they owned a dog before age 1 year.

According to Dr. Epstein, «Children with dog allergies who did not own dogs were 4 times more likely to develop eczema.»

Unlike dog ownership, cat ownership seemed to own a negative effect on children with cat allergies.

What dogs are excellent for allergies

«Children who owned a cat before age 1 year and were allergic to cats based on a skin allergy test were 13 times more likely to develop eczema by age 4 years,» Dr. Epstein explains. She notes, however, that children who were not allergic to cats were not at an increased risk for eczema if they owned a cat. Dr. Epstein suggests that parents of children at risk for eczema may desire to consider these findings when choosing a family pet.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Elsevier Health Sciences.

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  • Tolly G. Epstein et al. Opposing Effects of Cat and Dog Ownership and Allergic Sensitization on Eczema in an Atopic Birth Cohort. The Journal of Pediatrics, DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.07.026

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Cite This Page:

Elsevier Health Sciences.

What dogs are excellent for allergies

«Dog ownership is associated with reduced eczema in children with dog allergies.» ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100930093229.htm>.

Elsevier Health Sciences. (2010, October 1). Dog ownership is associated with reduced eczema in children with dog allergies. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100930093229.htm

Elsevier Health Sciences.

What dogs are excellent for allergies

«Dog ownership is associated with reduced eczema in children with dog allergies.» ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100930093229.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).

Spring has sprung,and with it the return of warmer weather, longer days, and one decidedly unwelcome guest: allergies.

It’s also the perfect season to turn the tables and glance at allergies from our pets’ point of view. So for Weird Animal Question of the Week, we’re responding to National Geographic’s own Emily Tye, who asks: "Can cats be allergic to dogs, or vice versa?"

We also wonder—can they be allergic to us?

"The answer to every of these is yes," saysRaelynn Farnsworth, of Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

(See "Coughing Cats May Be Allergic to People, Vets Say.")

"It’s rare, but dogs can be allergic to cat dander and people dander and vice versa. For everything."

Dander is made up of tiny cells shed from hair, fur, or feathers—and though you mostly hear it in relation to pets, humans produce it, too. Other common pet allergies include flea saliva and certain foods.


make a difference: sponsored opportunity

Cite This Page:

Elsevier Health Sciences. «Dog ownership is associated with reduced eczema in children with dog allergies.» ScienceDaily.

ScienceDaily, 1 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100930093229.htm>.

Elsevier Health Sciences. (2010, October 1). Dog ownership is associated with reduced eczema in children with dog allergies. ScienceDaily.

What dogs are excellent for allergies

Retrieved January 29, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100930093229.htm

Elsevier Health Sciences. «Dog ownership is associated with reduced eczema in children with dog allergies.» ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100930093229.htm (accessed January 29, 2020).

Spring has sprung,and with it the return of warmer weather, longer days, and one decidedly unwelcome guest: allergies.

It’s also the perfect season to turn the tables and glance at allergies from our pets’ point of view.

So for Weird Animal Question of the Week, we’re responding to National Geographic’s own Emily Tye, who asks: "Can cats be allergic to dogs, or vice versa?"

We also wonder—can they be allergic to us?

"The answer to every of these is yes," saysRaelynn Farnsworth, of Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. (See "Coughing Cats May Be Allergic to People, Vets Say.")

"It’s rare, but dogs can be allergic to cat dander and people dander and vice versa.

For everything."

Dander is made up of tiny cells shed from hair, fur, or feathers—and though you mostly hear it in relation to pets, humans produce it, too. Other common pet allergies include flea saliva and certain foods.


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