What causes pollen allergies

Allergic rhinitis is triggered by breathing in tiny particles of allergens. The most common airborne allergens that cause rhinitis are dust mites, pollen and spores, and animal skin, urine and saliva.

What causes pollen allergies

Animals

Many people are allergic to animals, such as cats and dogs. The allergic reaction is not caused by animal fur, but flakes of dead animal skin and their urine and saliva.

Dogs and cats are the most common animals to cause allergies, although some people are affected by horses, cattle, rabbits and rodents, such as guinea pigs and hamsters.

But being around dogs from an early age can assist protect against allergies, and there’s some evidence to propose that this might also be the case with cats.

Pollen and spores

Tiny particles of pollen produced by trees and grasses can sometimes cause allergic rhinitis.

Most trees pollinate from early to mid-spring, whereas grasses pollinate at the finish of spring and beginning of summer.

Rhinitis can also be caused by spores produced by mould and fungi.

House dust mites

House dust mites are tiny insects that feed on the dead flakes of human skin.

They can be found in mattresses, carpets, soft furniture, pillows and beds.

Rhinitis is not caused by the dust mites themselves, but by a chemical found in their excrement.

Dust mites are present every year circular, although their numbers tend to peak during the winter.

Work-related allergens

Some people are affected by allergens found in their work environment, such as wood dust, flour dust or latex.


Who’s most at risk

It’s not fully understood why some people become oversensitive to allergens, although you’re more likely to develop an allergy if there’s a history of allergies in your family.

If this is the case, you’re said to be «atopic», or to own «atopy».

What causes pollen allergies

People who are atopic have a genetic tendency to develop allergic conditions.

Their increased immune response to allergens results in increased production of IgE antibodies.

Environmental factors may also frolic a part. Studies own shown certain things may increase the chance of a kid developing allergies, such as growing up in a home where people smoke and being exposed to dust mites at a young age.

Causes of Allergy

An allergy is a disorder of the immune system that causes symptoms, such as sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, and a runny nose.

Allergens are the stimuli that cause these allergy-related symptoms. One of the most predominant allergies among the population is hay fever, which causes allergic conjunctivitis and itchiness.

Environmental or dietary factors can cause reactions to allergens. The majority of people that own allergies react to airborne particles, such as dust or pollen.

The risk of an allergic reaction is dependent on either host or environmental factors. An allergy is dependent on its host when the person is genetically predisposed for that allergy, either through inherited disease or congenital deficiency.

An environmentally-dependent allergy is triggered when the person comes in contact with an infectious disease, an airborne allergen, pollution, or if they change their diet.

A parent with an allergy is more likely to pass it to their kid, and the child’s allergy is also likely to be more severe. Identical twins will share the same allergy 70% of the time.

A person is more likely to suffer from an allergy if they live in a highly industrialized country, such as factory-heavy regions in China.

On the national level, allergies are more common in an individual that lives in an urban area as opposed to a rural area.

Other possibilities must be considered before an allergy is diagnosed. Some maladies share the same symptoms with certain allergies.

Skin, or puncture testing, consists of pricking a patient’s arm with minimal quantities of possible allergens. The patient is diagnosed with an allergy if the corresponding needle causes an inflammatory reaction.

Blood testing, although not as common as skin testing, is another way to determine if a patient is allergic to a specific substance.

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It’s a excellent thought to hold an eye on the predicted pollen counts, particularly if you plan to be outdoors for a endless period of time. (If you are planning to be exterior working around plants or cutting grass, a dust mask can help.)

But even if you see a high pollen count predicted in the newspaper, on a smartphone app or on TV, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will be affected. There are numerous types of pollen — from diverse kinds of trees, from grass and from a variety of weeds.

As a result, a high overall pollen count doesn’t always indicate a strong concentration of the specific pollen to which you’re allergic.

The opposite can be true, too: The pollen count might be low, but you might discover yourself around one of the pollens that triggers your allergies.

Through testing, an allergist can pinpoint which pollens bring on your symptoms.

What causes pollen allergies

An allergist can also assist you discover relief by determining which medications will work best for your set of triggers.

This sheet was reviewed for accuracy 4/23/2018.

posted: Apr 09, 2018.

Bottom Line:

Seasonal allergies- the runny nose, itchy eyes, and sneezing- are never enjoyment.

What causes pollen allergies

You may not realize the foods you eat can make your allergies worse. Certain foods can contribute to overstimulation of your immune system, activating your allergies. Little amounts of pollen on your fruits and vegetables can initiate an allergic reaction. So be certain to thoroughly wash your produce before eating to reduce the quantity of pollen and bacteria present on their outer layers. But, perhaps the worst trigger for allergies is excellent ol’ fashioned refined sugar.

So, contrary to favorite opinion, your allergies do NOT own a sweet tooth!

Why it Matters:

Refined sugar causes inflammation and stresses your immune system. When your immune system is stressed, your allergies get worse.

What causes pollen allergies

Talk about a catch 22! When you are suffering from a runny nose, itchy eyes and constant sneezing it is enticing to reach for a cookie or pastry. But that cookie may put you in a downward spiral of worsening allergies. Refined sugar raises your insulin levels and then causes your blood sugar to plummet. The spike in blood sugar is stressful to your body and can severely impact your immune systems’ ability to fight off allergens appropriately.

What causes pollen allergies

And a stressed immune system is never capable to function at its highest level.

— Refined sugar causes inflammation in your body and can accident your blood sugar levels

— Sugary foods put stress on your body and immune system

— Reducing refined sugar in your diet can assist reduce your seasonal allergies

Next Steps:

Avoiding excess refined sugar is a grand way to reduce your allergies. The next time you feel your allergies coming on, recognize it’s a body signal that your immune system is stressed out. Attempt avoiding sugary snacks for a few days and give your body a chance to get well.

What causes pollen allergies

Also, if you know someone who has been suffering from allergies and has “tried everything” to get well, share this paper with them and invite them to our monthly workshop. This information may assist them feel better than ever this spring!

Science Source:

7 Foods That Can Assist Fight Seasonal Allergies. Prevention 2017.


So Boiling in Here

Reports of pollen allergies first appeared around the time of the industrial revolution. Whether that means that these allergies were the product of pollution, new diets, or changes in hygiene isn’t clear. What is clear, writes Charles W.

Schmidt in this month’s issue of Environmental Health Perspectives, is the role of climate change in contemporary pollen allergies.

“When exposed to warmer temperatures and higher levels of CO2, plants grow more vigorously and produce more pollen than they otherwise would,” writes Schmidt.

Warming temperatures in some areas, love the northern United States, extend the periods during which plants release pollen. The combined effect of warming temperatures and more CO2 means that the quantity of pollen in the air has been increasing and will continue to increase as climate change worsens.

(According to a study presented by Bielory, pollen counts could double by 2040.)

This is bad news not just for people who own allergies, but also for people who don’t.

“In general, the longer you’re exposed to an allergen, the more likely you are going to be sensitized to that allergen,” Bielory says. People who own pollen allergies may experience intensified symptoms, and people who don’t normally own pollen allergies may start to.

Already, Schmidt writes, there “is evidence suggesting that hay fever prevalence is rising in numerous parts of the world.”


Does Honey Help?

With the increase in the number of pollen allergy-sufferers, it’s understandable that people own begun to seek natural ways to alleviate their symptoms.

What causes pollen allergies

Some own even argued that consuming honey will build up your resistance because it contains pollen.

But as Rachel E. Gross points at out Slate, that theory’s just honey bunches of lies; mainly because the pollen that makes you sneeze doesn’t come from flowers.

In the spring, the pollen that gives humans allergies comes from trees. In the summer, people own allergic reactions to grass pollen; and at the finish finish of summer and beginning of drop, people start to suffer from pollinating weeds—especially ragweed, which has spread from the United States to Europe and the Middle East.

Really, the “natural” ways to deal with pollen allergies are to stay clean, hold your windows closed, and go exterior when pollen counts are lower, such as after it rains.

If your symptoms are bad enough, take over-the-counter medication or see an allergist. And if you don’t mind the risk of malnutrition or life-threatening diseases, there’s always hookworms.

Follow Becky Little on .

Oversensitive immune system

If you own allergic rhinitis, your natural defence against infection and illness (your immune system) will react to an allergen as if it were harmful.

If your immune system is oversensitive, it’ll react to allergens by producing antibodies to fight them off.

Antibodies are special proteins in the blood that are generally produced to fight viruses and infections.

Allergic reactions do not happen the first time you come into contact with an allergen.

The immune system has to recognise and «memorise» it before producing antibodies to fight it. This process is known as sensitisation.

After you develop sensitivity to an allergen, it’ll be detected by antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE) whenever it comes into contact with the inside of your nose and throat.

These antibodies cause cells to release a number of chemicals, including histamine, which can cause the inside layer of your nose (the mucous membrane) to become inflamed and produce too much mucus.

This is what causes the typical symptoms of sneezing and a blocked or runny nose.


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