What are some of the symptoms of a cockroach allergy

When you own to wrestle with your allergies each night at bedtime, you may fitfully throw and turn and then wake up exhausted. It feels love you slept for maybe an hour or two. As you drag on with your day, bleary-eyed and dead tired, it’s simple to assume you’re so exhausted because your stuffy nose, eye itchiness, and coughing kept you awake.

While that could be true, you could also be dealing with sleep apnea without even knowing it. Obstructive sleep apnea is a form of sleep apnea associated with allergies. The nasal symptoms of your allergies make you snore when you might regularly don’t.

The sound of your snoring, while extremely distracting to a partner, can even annoy you, causing you to wake up again and again throughout the night.

The upper airway is obstructed with this sleep apnea, either somewhat or every the way. Since your airway cannot open, the lungs don’t get as much air unless your chest muscles and diaphragm strain.

You can own obstructive sleep apnea and not even know it because you’re barely aware of what’s causing you to hold waking every night.

Here are the other symptoms:

  1. Feelings of restlessness
  2. Mood changes, depression, feeling forgetful, and difficulty with concentrating on tasks
  3. Snoring
  4. A choking or gasping feeling that wakes you up, even several times a night
  5. Morning headaches
  6. Constant exhaustion that makes it hard to get out of bed
  7. Night sweating
  8. Sore throat and/or dry mouth in the morning

By seeing your provider, you can start getting your case of obstructive sleep apnea under control.


Other Tips for Lessening Nighttime Allergies and Getting Better Sleep

Here are some of our top tips for getting your night allergies under control and your sleep back on track:

  1. For those with cockroach allergies, call an exterminator.

    They can tell you if there are any upstairs gaps where cockroaches can get into your bedroom. For instance, they may squeeze in through a window, a crack in the wall, or a little crevice.

  2. If you own a dust mite allergy, wash your sheets and other bedding at a high temperature, at least 130 degrees Fahrenheit. The boiling water will assist remove any lingering mites.
  3. Make certain your home doesn’t own any pipes or roof seals with leaks. If you spot these, get them repaired.
  4. For indoor mold allergies, you also desire to use dehumidifiers in the above rooms, as these hold too much moisture from forming.
  5. Make certain you change and clean your bedding every week to hold dust mites away.
  6. If you ponder it’s indoor mold that’s worsening your nighttime allergies, make certain you own adequate ventilation in every room of the home.

    This goes double for kitchens, bathrooms, and basements, where humidity levels can change more often.

  7. After you’re done spending time with your pet, change clothes and wash the ones you wore while spending time with your animal. Don’t bring clothes into your bedroom unless they’re clean.
  8. Get plastic or fabric covers for your pillows, box spring, and mattresses so dust mites can’t get into your bed.



According to the American Lung Association, there are 15 million asthmatics in this country, and almost one-third are children under 18. The number of cases has risen by two-thirds since 1980, with a disportionate quantity of the increase among lower-income Hispanic- Americans and African-Americans and children.

Asthma is a chronic, inflammatory disease often brought on by allergic reactions that results in narrowed airways in the lungs.

Symptoms range from mild shortness of breath to severe airway obstruction that can result in wheezing or, in about 5,000 cases a year, death.

The study involved 476 asthmatic children who were drawn from a larger sample of 1,528 youngsters living in New York City, St. Louis, Baltimore, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and Washington. Researchers used skin tests to pinpoint the proteins to which the children were allergic and measured the levels of diverse allergens in their homes.

Tests showed that 37 percent of the children, whose mean age was 6.2 years, were allergic to cockroaches, 35 percent to dust mites and 23 percent to cats.

Examining dust taken from participants' bedrooms, the researchers reported finding 50 percent of the rooms having high levels of cockroach allergens, compared with 9.7 percent with high amounts of dust mite allergen and 12.6 percent with elevated amounts of cat allergen.

Dr. Daniel Rotrosen of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which financed the $17 million study, said doctors had known that cockroaches were highly allergenic, but until now had not appreciated their role in asthma.

''Now we know that cockroach allergen contributes to asthmatic severity at high levels of exposure and this provides incentives to reduce that exposure,'' Dr.

Rotrosen said. His agency is extending the study to the year 2000 to explore more extensively what environmental changes are most useful in reducing allergen exposure and asthma symptoms, he said.

Dr. Floyd J. Malveaux, dean of the Howard University College of Medicine in Washington and a principal investigator on the new study, said: ''This study shows that cockroach allergen is the major cause of asthma in the inner city and is contrary to the findings of other studies, which raised the possibility that the home dust mite might be the greater factor.''

What are the symptoms of dust mite allergy?

Some common dust mite allergy symptoms include sneezing, runny nose, irritated eyes, scratchy throat, coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath.

These same symptoms can be caused by a variety of other allergens as well, so consult your allergist for testing.

How can I get rid of dust mites?

In most parts of the world, it’s impossible to completely eliminate dust mites from your home.

However, you can take steps to minimize your exposure to dust mite allergens by keeping your home as dust-free as possible.

Vacuuming and dusting are not enough to remove dust mites, because these creatures can live deep inside your upholstery, mattresses, carpets, etc.

What are some of the symptoms of a cockroach allergy

You can cover mattresses, pillows, and upholstered furniture with zippered dust-proof covers – the material of these covers is designed with pores that are too little for dust mites to pass through. Wash sheets, blankets and other bedding every week in boiling water (no more than 120°F) to kill dust mites. Replace carpeting with hard flooring and avoid plush rugs, fabric draperies, and anything else that cannot easily be washed regularly.

Use a dehumidifier to reduce the humidity in your home under 50%, making it a less suitable environment for dust mites.

Clean hard surfaces with a wet mop or cloth to avoid stirring dry allergens up into the air.

Use HEPA filters to trap dust mites and other allergens.

Change the filters every three months to ensure they remain effective.

This sheet was reviewed and updated 2/2/2018.

Insect Allergies

Many people ponder of warm weather when they ponder of insect allergies. Warm weather does signal the arrival of some unwanted visitors love stinging and biting insects. However, you can discover two extremely common “bugs” every year endless in homes and buildings. Neither one needs to bite or sting you to cause an allergic reaction, but both trigger allergy and asthma in numerous people.

What are dust mites?

Dust mites are tiny creatures that frequently make their home in places love furniture, carpets, and bedding.

They are too little to be seen without a microscope or magnifying glass. They own eight legs and are not true insects, but relatives of spiders.

Dust mites feed on the flakes of skin shed by humans (and animals) every day. They prefer environments with 70 to 80% humidity, and temperatures of 68 to 77°F.

According to the American Lung Association, there are 15 million asthmatics in this country, and almost one-third are children under 18. The number of cases has risen by two-thirds since 1980, with a disportionate quantity of the increase among lower-income Hispanic- Americans and African-Americans and children.

Asthma is a chronic, inflammatory disease often brought on by allergic reactions that results in narrowed airways in the lungs.

Symptoms range from mild shortness of breath to severe airway obstruction that can result in wheezing or, in about 5,000 cases a year, death.

The study involved 476 asthmatic children who were drawn from a larger sample of 1,528 youngsters living in New York City, St. Louis, Baltimore, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and Washington. Researchers used skin tests to pinpoint the proteins to which the children were allergic and measured the levels of diverse allergens in their homes.

Tests showed that 37 percent of the children, whose mean age was 6.2 years, were allergic to cockroaches, 35 percent to dust mites and 23 percent to cats.

Examining dust taken from participants' bedrooms, the researchers reported finding 50 percent of the rooms having high levels of cockroach allergens, compared with 9.7 percent with high amounts of dust mite allergen and 12.6 percent with elevated amounts of cat allergen.

Dr. Daniel Rotrosen of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which financed the $17 million study, said doctors had known that cockroaches were highly allergenic, but until now had not appreciated their role in asthma.

''Now we know that cockroach allergen contributes to asthmatic severity at high levels of exposure and this provides incentives to reduce that exposure,'' Dr.

Rotrosen said. His agency is extending the study to the year 2000 to explore more extensively what environmental changes are most useful in reducing allergen exposure and asthma symptoms, he said.

Dr. Floyd J. Malveaux, dean of the Howard University College of Medicine in Washington and a principal investigator on the new study, said: ''This study shows that cockroach allergen is the major cause of asthma in the inner city and is contrary to the findings of other studies, which raised the possibility that the home dust mite might be the greater factor.''

What else gets into dust that might cause allergies?

The dust in your home may contain pet hair and dander, mold or pollen spores, and dust mite or cockroach body parts and droppings, every of which are common allergens.

These allergens can cause an allergic reaction when you inhale or come into contact with them.

What Kinds of Insects Cause Allergic Reactions?

There are numerous diverse kinds of insects or “insect-like bugs” that can cause an allergic reaction:

Stinging Insects

Bees, wasps, hornets, yellow-jackets and fire ants are the most common stinging insects that cause an allergic reaction. When these insects sting you, they inject a toxic substance called venom.

Most people stung by these insects recover within hours or days. In others, this venom can trigger a life-threatening allergic reaction.

Biting Insects

Mosquitoes, kissing bugs, bedbugs, fleas and certain flies are the most common biting insects known to cause an allergic reaction. Most people bitten by insects suffer pain, redness, itching, stinging and minor swelling in the area around the bite. Rarely, insect bites may trigger a life-threatening allergic reaction.

A bite from a Lone Star tick can cause people to develop an allergy to meat.

These ticks carry alpha-gal (a sugar). When a tick bites a person, it transfers alpha-gal into the bloodstream. The person’s immune system then reacts to it. Alpha-gal is also found in mammal meat (beef, lamb, pork). If you own allergy symptoms after eating meat, see an allergist.

Household Pests

Non-stinging and non-biting insects can also cause allergic reactions, particularlycockroachesand insect-likedust mites. These two insects may be the most common cause of year-round allergy and asthma.

Unlike a cockroach, a dust mite is too little to see with the naked eye. The cockroach and dust mite’s waste and body cause allergic reactions. They also can trigger asthma symptoms and asthma attacks.

What Are the Signs of an Allergic Reaction to Insects?

Most people stung or bitten by insects suffer pain, redness, itching and minor swelling in the area around the bite or sting. This is anormal reaction.

Most people get better within hours or days.

Anallergic reactionto insects that don’t sting or bite, love cockroaches or dust mites, is diverse.

What are some of the symptoms of a cockroach allergy

You may sneeze, cough, own a runny or stuffy nose, or itchy eyes, nose, mouth or throat. These symptoms can be confused with the common freezing, but final for weeks or months at a time. If you own asthma, an allergic reaction could trigger asthma symptoms or an asthma attack.

People can own a serious allergic reaction to stinging or biting insects. Alife-threatening allergic reaction(anaphylaxis)produces signs and symptoms that require immediate medical attention.Without immediate treatment, anaphylaxis may cause death.

Symptoms generally involve more than one organ system (part of the body), such as the skin or mouth, the lungs, the heart, and the gut. Some symptoms include:

  1. Shortness of breath, trouble breathing or wheezing (whistling sound during breathing)
  2. Dizziness and/or fainting
  3. Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  4. Skin rashes, itching or hives
  5. Stomach pain, vomiting, bloating or diarrhea
  6. Feeling love something terrible is about to happen

Other serious but non-allergic reactions include:

  1. Atoxic reactionthat happenswhen the body reacts to insect venom love it is a poison.

    A toxic reaction can cause symptoms similar to those of an allergic reaction. Other symptoms include nausea, fever, fainting, seizures, shock and even death.

  1. Serum sicknesswhichis an unusual reaction to a foreign substance in the body. It can cause symptoms hours or days after the sting or bite. Symptoms include fever, joint pain, other flu-like symptoms and sometimes hives.

Medical ReviewOctober 2015.

Cockroaches are synonymous with dirt, filth and poor hygiene.

Their feeding and nesting habits mean they can easily accumulate a range of diverse organisms, which, when transmitted, can result in complications to your health.

For businesses, this can own a negative impact on both staff health and retention. In addition, those operating within the food industry could experience a breach in food safety laws, as cockroaches own been linked to the spread of foodborne diseases.

Cockroaches can spread a range of diseases. However, unlike mosquitoes, they are not direct vectors of diseases through mechanical transfer and acting as a reservoir. Transmission occurs indirectly, from consumption or contact with items which own been contaminated by cockroaches, rather than through bites.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO)“Cockroaches are not generally the most significant cause of a disease, but love houseflies, they frolic a supplementary role in the spread of some diseases”..

Cockroaches are proven or suspected carriers of the organisms that cause the following infections:

  1. Dysentery
  2. Plague
  3. Leprosy
  4. Cholera
  5. Listeriosis
  6. Typhoid Fever
  7. Campylobacteriosis
  8. Salmonellosis
  9. Gastroenteritis
  10. Giardia

Cockroaches can also trigger asthma and other allergies as well as spread E.coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus.

Similar to rodents, cockroaches are known to transmit the Salmonella [sp.] bacteria which can cause salmonellosis, a disease in humans with symptoms similar to food poisoning.

It is believed that cockroaches accumulate the bacteria by feeding on contaminated food.

The Salmonella remains in their digestive system for a month or more and is deposited through their vomit and faeces.

Human symptoms, which typically show 12 to 72 hours after infection, include diarrhoea, fever, and vomiting (to name a few). Recovery generally occurs after four to seven days, with little to no medical treatment need, besides replenishing fluids.

Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection caused by the Salmonella typhi bacterium and is a highly infectious disease. It is believed that cockroaches accumulate this disease by consuming faeces contaminated with the bacterium.

Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection caused by the Salmonella typhi bacterium and is a highly infectious disease.

It is believed that cockroaches accumulate this disease by consuming faeces contaminated with the bacterium.

According to the UK National Health Services (NHS) Typhoid fever is most common in developing countries where there is poor sanitation and limited access to clean water. Children and the elderly are thought to be most at risk due to their immunocompromised states.

The symptoms of typhoid fever include, but are not limited to:

  1. Head and muscle aches
  2. Exhaustion
  3. Constipation or diarrhoea
  4. High temperature
  5. Stomach Pain

You should seek medical attention if you experience any of the symptoms for typhoid fever.

With treatment, this disease will quickly improve within three to five days. If it isn’t treated, serious complications can develop.

Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal infection caused by the Vibrio cholerae bacterium. It is most common in developing countries and areas that own inadequate environmental management. Infection occurs through ingestion of food and drink contaminated with the bacterium. If exposed to the bacterium, cockroaches can spread the organism through their faeces and vomit, contaminating surfaces and food.

Researchers from the World Health Organization own estimated that worldwide there are roughly 1.4 million to 4.3 million cases of cholera per year resulting in 28,000 to 142,000 deaths.

Around 80% of people infected with cholera do not develop any symptoms, although the bacterium is present in their faeces for 1-10 days after infection.

Among the little percentage who do develop symptoms, 80% own mild to moderate symptoms with around 20% developing acute watery diarrhoea resulting in severe dehydration.

Dysentery is a type of gastroenteritis that results in diarrhoea with blood. Generally, most people suffer from mild symptoms and recover within a week or so without medical attention.

There are two types of dysentery. They are:

  1. Bacillary dysentery: Sometimes referred to as shigellosis. It is caused by the Shigella bacteria.
  2. Amoebic dysentery: Is caused by a single-celled parasite called Entamoeba.

    It is generally found in tropical areas.

Dysentery is generally spread through poor hand hygiene and consuming food and drink contaminated with the organisms. Symptoms are diarrhoea containing blood and mucus, painful stomach cramps, nausea and vomiting, and a high temperature.

Cockroaches, along with other insects, are suspected of being carriers of the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae which causes the disease leprosy.

Cockroaches are believed to spread the disease through their faeces.

Whilst the bacteria are not highly infectious, if left untreated, it can cause permanent damage to the skin, nerves, eyes and skin which can lead to disfigurement and deformities.

Leprosy has an incubation period of around five years but symptoms may take as endless as 20 years to appear. Treatment is possible using multidrug therapy (MDT).

Although it’s often thought to be a rodent-borne disease, cockroaches are also suspected of spreading the Yersinia pestis bacterium which is known to cause the bubonic plague.

Common symptoms of the bubonic plague include, but are not limited to:

  1. Chills
  2. Muscle cramps
  3. Swollen and painful lymph nodes.
  4. High fever

People infected by the plague need to get urgent treatment and should be given antibiotics 24 hours after infection to avoid severe consequences.

It is estimated that the bubonic plague was responsible for around 50 million deaths in the fourteenth century.

According to the WHO, there were 783 reported cases of the bubonic plague in 2013, resulting in 126 deaths.

Campylobacteriosis is an infection caused by the Campylobacter bacterium. It is one the most common bacterial infections in humans, and is a common foodborne illness. Researchers own isolated a Campylobacter jejuni subspecies in the gut contents and on the external surface of both American cockroaches and Oriental cockroaches.

Transmission occurs through ingesting contaminated food and drink such as unpasteurised milk and undercooked and poorly handled poultry. It can also be transmitted through sexual contact, although this is extremely rare.

Symptoms of campylobacteriosis include bloody diarrhoea as well as cramps, abdominal pain and fever.

The disease generally lasts for 2-10 days and requires little to no medical treatment. However, as with any occurrence of diarrhoea, it is significant to replenish fluids to avoid dehydration.

Listeriosis is a serious infection caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. It is generally contracted by consuming contaminated food and drink. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) it is an significant public health problem in the United States.

Listeriosis primarily affects people with weakened immune systems such as pregnant women, newborns and the elderly. Although rare, people with strong immune systems can also be affected.

Symptoms of listeriosis are generally a fever, muscle aches and diarrhoea.

However, if the diseases spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract, symptoms can also include headaches, a stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions. For pregnant women, contracting listeriosis can sometimes lead to miscarriage, stillbirth or premature delivery.

Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a bacterium commonly found in the gut of humans. Although most strains of the bacteria are harmless, some can cause serious food poisoning.

The common symptoms of an E. coli infection are watery diarrhoea and abdominal cramping.

Less common symptoms are:

  1. Chills
  2. Nausea
  3. Fever
  4. Muscle aches

Symptoms generally final three weeks and require little to no medical support. Cockroaches are believed to spread the infection through contaminating food and drink and mechanical transfer on their feet and exoskeleton.

Although they are not necessarily referred to as diseases, there are a handful of bacteria that cockroaches spread which could develop into serious infections.

Staphylococcus aureus, is a gram-positive cocci bacterium.

This organism is generally harmless, but can cause serious infections.

Infection can happen in numerous forms ranging from minor skin infections, such as boils, to infections of the blood, lungs and heart. Cockroaches are known to carry the bacterium on their exoskeletons or in their digestive tracts.

Like Staphylococcus aureus, streptococcus infections come in numerous diverse forms, from mild throat infections to life-threatening infections of the blood or organs.

To add to the other bacterial diseases transmitted by cockroaches, there is also a link between these crawling insects and asthma.

Cockroach allergy was first reported in 1943.

It was discovered when patients developed a rash after cockroaches crawled on their skin.

Cockroaches can trigger asthma because they certain proteins in their bodies which can be an allergen for certain people. When tiny particles from cockroach bodies are spread through the air in buildings, these proteins are inhaled and an asthma attack can be triggered in sensitive people.

The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology reports that the saliva, faeces and shed skin of cockroaches can trigger both asthma and other allergic responses.

The National Pest Management Association has carried out studies around cockroach allergens and residential homes.

Its studies show that around 63% of homes in the US contain allergens. This statistic rises for homes in urban areas (between 78% and 98%).

It is estimated by the WHO that 300 million people worldwide suffer from asthma. It has been discovered that frequent hospital visits of children living in cities suffering from asthma can often be as a result to contact with cockroaches. Around 23-60% of people with asthma are sensitive to cockroach allergens.

As they are reservoirs of organisms which cause disease and not vectors, cockroaches use other means to spread diseases.

Cockroaches can spread diseases through:

  1. Droppings
  2. Vomit
  3. Direct contact

Due to their unsanitary eating habits, cockroaches can pass harmful pathogens through their droppings.

When a cockroach feasts on something contaminated, such as a raw piece of chicken or animal faeces, the organism will enter, and may lay dormant in their digestive system. The pathogen will then be excreted in cockroach droppings and will contaminate surfaces and food.

Cockroach saliva is also responsible for spreading a range of diseases. Similar to droppings, saliva can harbour pathogens accumulated from eating contaminated items.

Cockroaches can be found living in sewers, cesspits, drains and rubbish bins where they come into contact with a range of organisms, such as bacteria and viruses, which can become attached to cockroaches’ bodies.

The legs of a cockroach, for example, own spines that are sensitive to touch and provide a extremely large surface area to pick up pathogens. Anything a cockroach touches or rubs past may then become contaminated.

You can catch a disease from a cockroach in a range of diverse ways. However, for the most part, cockroach diseases are caught by coming into contact with items that a cockroach has contaminated.

The most common form of transmission of a disease from a cockroach is from eating or drinking anything it has contaminated. This can either be through consuming food or drink contaminated by cockroaches, or by eating or drinking something that has been made using contaminated cooking utensils, cutlery or crockery, or touched contaminated surfaces.

If the air supply is contaminated with proteins from cockroach faeces, vomit or shed skin and this is inhaled by people suffering from asthma, an attack can be triggered.

Touching items contaminated with a organism deposited by cockroaches is also a route through which transmission can happen.

What are some of the symptoms of a cockroach allergy

Touching an item which has been contaminated then touching your eyes, nose, mouth or an open wound can result in the pathogen entering the body and infection setting in.

The most effective way to prevent to cockroaches spreading diseases in your home or trade is to reduce to possibility of these crawling insects entering your property. This best way to do this is to enlist the necessary cockroach prevention methods.

Following the correct prevention techniques will reduce the risk of an infection from a disease spread by cockroaches, and drastically reduce the potential for cockroaches to spread diseases through your property.

You can prevent diseases spread by cockroaches by:

  1. Through cleaning practices
  2. Following proper hand hygiene
  3. Sealing cracks and gaps

Cleaning is one of the most effective methods for preventing cockroaches.

Not only will it make your property less appealing to them in the first put, it will also get rid of any bacteria or virus they’ve spread.

It’s advised that you clean floors, worksurfaces, sinks and drains on a regularly basis and cooking utensils, cutlery and crockery before and after use. Removing any possible food sources, such as dropped food, grease behind ovens and pet faeces, is also a excellent idea.

For businesses operating within the food industry, complying with the proper food safety regulations in regards to cleaning can assist reduce the risk of diseases carried by cockroaches being spread.

Washing your hands on a regular basis can help in reducing the risk of cockroach-borne diseases.

Wash your hands with soap and warm water on a regular basis to assist eliminate any bacteria, germs or viruses which can cause the diseases spread by cockroaches.

It is significant that you wash your hands:

  1. NHS UK.

    What are some of the symptoms of a cockroach allergy

    Typhoid fever — NHS Choices. (link, accessed 4 October 2016)

  2. World Health Organization. Leprosy. (link, accessed 6 October 2016)
  3. World Health Organization. Cholera. (link, accessed 4 October 2016)
  4. Vector Control: Methods for use by individuals and communities. 1st ed. Geneva: World Health Organization, pp.288 to 301. (link accessed 4 October 2016)
  5. Umunnabuike, AC, & Irokanulo, EA. (1986) Isolation of Campylobacter subsp.

    What are some of the symptoms of a cockroach allergy

    jejuni from Oriental and American cockroaches caught in kitchens and poultry houses in Vom, Nigeria. Int. J.

    What are some of the symptoms of a cockroach allergy

    Zoonoses, 13(3), pp.180-6.

  6. Foodpoisonjournal.com. Cockroaches and Foodborne Illness. (link accessed 4 October 2016)
  7. Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. Listeriosis. (link, accessed 6 October 2016)
  8. After using the washroom.
  9. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Cockroach Allergies. (link)
  10. NHS UK. Dysentery — NHS Choices. (link, accessed 6 October 2016)
  11. Before, during and after preparing food.
  12. After handling any material which could transfer germs.
  13. Centre for Disease Control and Prevention.

    E.coli. (link, accessed 6 October 2016)

  14. Before and after eating.
  15. World Health Organization. The Plague. (link, accessed 31 October 2016)

Sealing cracks or gaps in and around your property helps to reduce the number of entry points for cockroaches. This in turn reduces their potential to transmit organisms which cause diseases through your home or businesses.

It’s a excellent thought to regularly examine your property to make certain there are no entry points, and seal them with expanding foam and other materials if necessary. It is also advised that you regularly examine and repair damaged drains and pipes.

The best way to reduce the risk of cockroach diseases is to enlist the assist of a professional pest control professional (exterminator).

With over 90 years of experience, Rentokil provide a range of services and solutions to both prevent and exterminate cockroaches, which will reduce the potential for these crawling insects to spread diseases in your property.

  • NHS UK.

    Dysentery — NHS Choices. (link, accessed 6 October 2016)

  • American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Cockroach Allergies. (link)
  • World Health Organization. Leprosy. (link, accessed 6 October 2016)
  • NHS UK. Typhoid fever — NHS Choices. (link, accessed 4 October 2016)
  • Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. Listeriosis. (link, accessed 6 October 2016)
  • World Health Organization. Cholera. (link, accessed 4 October 2016)
  • Umunnabuike, AC, & Irokanulo, EA. (1986) Isolation of Campylobacter subsp. jejuni from Oriental and American cockroaches caught in kitchens and poultry houses in Vom, Nigeria. Int.

    J. Zoonoses, 13(3), pp.180-6.

  • Vector Control: Methods for use by individuals and communities. 1st ed. Geneva: World Health Organization, pp.288 to 301. (link accessed 4 October 2016)
  • Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. E.coli. (link, accessed 6 October 2016)
  • Foodpoisonjournal.com. Cockroaches and Foodborne Illness. (link accessed 4 October 2016)
  • World Health Organization. The Plague. (link, accessed 31 October 2016)

Posted on: December 13, 2019

It’s the same thing almost every single night. You brush your teeth, finish your nightly routine, climb into bed, and immediately feel congested and sneezy.

If you suffer from allergies, your symptoms most likely get worse at night.

This is something you share with other allergy patients. In fact, research shows that 74% of allergy sufferers wake up during the night because of allergy symptoms and over 90% of sufferers own difficulty sleeping.


Posted on: December 13, 2019

It’s the same thing almost every single night. You brush your teeth, finish your nightly routine, climb into bed, and immediately feel congested and sneezy.

If you suffer from allergies, your symptoms most likely get worse at night.

This is something you share with other allergy patients. In fact, research shows that 74% of allergy sufferers wake up during the night because of allergy symptoms and over 90% of sufferers own difficulty sleeping.


Types of Allergies that Could Become Worse During the Night

No matter what type of allergy you own, it can ruin your sleep. Rashes, food allergies, or an upset stomach triggered by allergies can cause sleep problems, but the most common pair of sleep-destroyers are nasal allergies and asthma, numerous of which stem from several common allergies including:

Pet Dander

Those who are allergic to pet dander can own instant reactions or longer-term symptoms.

An animal doesn’t even own to be present for a pet dander allergic reaction to take put. Dander can travel and land on lots of household and bedroom surfaces. This means that, even if you don’t own a pet yourself, you can bring the dander home with you and then own to deal with allergy symptoms for days, maybe even longer.

Indoor Mold

While you hope to never own to deal with indoor mildew and mold, it does happen. If you’re allergic to mold, then it could trigger your allergies and hold you up at night. That’s especially true if your bedroom is shut to a bathroom.

While we’ll share some tips for avoiding allergies later in this article, you should clean indoor mold as soon as you spot it.

To properly clean mold, stir bleach and water until you own a cleaning material made up of about five percent bleach. You can also use detergent in lieu of bleach.

Pollen

As one of the most common allergy triggers, pollen affects millions of people in the United States. Although it’s an outdoor powder, pollen can travel anywhere. Animals can transport it, as can insects, birds, and the wind.

When you go exterior, pollen particles settle on your skin, your hair, your clothes, and your shoes. If you don’t wash your clothes and take a shower, then you can finish up having pollen in your bed. Sleeping with an open window can also permit pollen to get in as the sun rises and pollen counts do, too.

Dust Mites

Both asthma and allergy sufferers could own a dust mite allergy.

Dust mites prefer carpeting, some furniture, and bedding to live in. That means they love warmer indoor environments love your bedroom, which is one reason your symptoms may get worse at night – there are more dust mites in your room. Almost microscopic dust mites may live on your pillow, box spring, and mattress.

Dust mites may cause symptoms love itchiness, a feeling of being unable to breathe, chest tightness, coughing, wheezing, eye itchiness and redness, nose stuffiness, and sneezing.

Cockroaches

Cockroaches can get in through your window and make you feel symptomatic. According to information from the ACAAI, up to 98 percent of US urban homes could own cockroach allergens, with 63 percent of every other homes potentially containing the insect allergen.

If you own a cockroach allergy, you may be more susceptible to sinus infections and ear infections.

You might also experience wheezing, skin rashes, nasal congestion, and coughing as your symptoms.


What Triggers Allergy Night-Time Symptoms?

There are multiple potential triggers for night-time allergy symptoms. Indoor allergens including dust mites, pet dander, and pollen are a few examples. Dust mites could live in your bedroom. Pet dander, which is skin (as well as urine and saliva) and not fur, can stick to your clothing or bedding and cause allergy symptoms that way.

The same goes for pollen. It can exist indoors, and if you spend time exterior and don’t immediately wash your hands and change your clothes and shoes, you could bring even more pollen inside your bedroom.


How to Sleep Well with Allergies

If you’re not dealing with obstructive sleep apnea, there are some common tips you can follow to deal with your allergies and get a better night’s rest.

Consider that Your Pillow and Mattress May Be the Blame

Pillows and mattresses are grand for you getting a excellent night’s sleep, but they also excel at harboring allergy triggers such as dust mites, pollen, and pet dander.

Replacing pillows or covering them with an anti-allergy pillow case helps. In addition, there are anti-allergen mattress covers for sale that are effective in helping to relieve nighttime allergy symptoms.

Keep Your Sleeping Environment Allergen Free

You need your sleep, so, the room you sleep in needs to be cleaned often to remove pollen, dust mites, and other allergens. Vacuuming under the bed helps in this effort by removing allergens living underneath it. A home-remedy that helps hold your bedroom allergen free is to wipe below hard flooring, molding and the walls near your bed with white vinegar.

Mold is an allergen that enjoys living on dark walls and floors. Dehumidifiers can assist hold relative humidity at the recommended levels of 30-50% and air conditioning to maintain temperatures at 70 degrees F or under will retard dust mite and mold growth. Hardwood flooring is best.

Have Pets Sleep Elsewhere

In addition to dander, pets also carry dust mites, pollen and other allergens trapped in their coats. Allowing them to sleep on your bed allows for these allergens to transfer onto bedding and night clothes making allergy symptoms worse.

Take Precautions Against Higher Pollen Levels at Night

Surprisingly, pollen levels continue to rise throughout the night and peak around dawn.

What are some of the symptoms of a cockroach allergy

Keeping windows closed and running air conditioning with a premium air filter can assist reduce nighttime allergy symptoms.

Wash Before Sleeping

Throughout the day your body and hair are exposed to and collect allergens such as pollen and dust. Accordingly, if you shower or bathe in the morning, attempt switching your time to wash your hair and body before bed time so that you don’t bring allergens into bed with you.


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