What allergy is high today in dallas

Dr. Cherie Booth has been a practicing Otologist in the DFW area for the past 6 years. She completed her medical school and residency training at the University of Texas Health Science Middle in San Antonio. Upon completion of her residency, she completed a fellowship in Otology and Neuro-otology and is board certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology. Dr. Booth treats both adults and children with complicated and chronic ear disease, hearing loss, inner ear disorders, dizziness, and allergies. She believes that it is her responsibility to care for patients exactly how she would a loving family member.

Dr. Booth deems her role in the doctor-patient relationship as a healthcare educator. She likes to work with each patient individually on their otologic needs to determine the best treatment plan for them. She sees herself as the person responsible for discussing each treatment option with the patient but ultimately believes the patient should make the best decision for their care.

Dr. Booth has received numerous awards and recognition in the community as a well-respected otologist in the community. She has received numerous recognitions including receiving the Rising Star recognition by Texas Monthly.

While approximately 5 percent of the physicians within their respective state or region are named to Super Doctors, no more than 2.5 percent are named to the Rising Stars list.

“Dr. Cherie Booth is amazing both professional and personable. I highly recommend her.”-Patricia F.



Richard Thrasher, M.D.

Dr. Richard Thrasher is a unique leader in the medical community, currently serving as the Immediate Past Chief of Staff of the Baylor Scott & White Medical Middle at McKinney and as the managing partner of the ENT & Allergy Centers of Texas, he has held numerous other physician leadership positions listed on his LinkedIn sheet.

He has been named a D Magazine Best ENT on multiple occasions and has won the coveted Living Magazine Reader’s Choice Award as Best ENT in McKinney and Allen for 7 consecutive years. Prior to serving as a Major in the United States Air Force, he went to the University of Utah for his undergraduate degree, the University of Connecticut School of Medicine for his MD, and then to the University of Colorado to finish his residency.

Having lived in 9 states, he moved to Texas in 2007 and says he has found his home.

Dr. Thrasher seeks out and thrives on leading-edge medical technologies. Often a consultant for and an early adopter of the latest medical technology he was among the first 60 physicians in the country to utilize balloon sinuplasty and among the first ENTs in North Texas to be certified on the DaVinci Robot. He performed the first implantation of the Inspire device in Collin County for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. He advances his practice and the health of his patients through pioneering and breakthrough procedures such as the Latera implant and the Vivaer procedure.

Dr. Thrasher is board certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery and brings each patient a distinctive mix of brilliant surgical acumen and a ready grin. He has authored several publications as well as having been featured on NBC news and in local magazines.

A resident of Prosper, he is the dad of two and devoted to his family and community. He has become a well-respected travel and landscape photographer in his spare time with multiple awards with some of his work displayed on 500px. He will confess to playing several sports poorly and is a self-proclaimed technology geek who covets anything with a microchip in it.

“I can’t tell enough about this group.

Being in the medical field myself, I’m extremely specific about my care, as well as my families care. It’s not just about the physicians, it’s also about patient care the second you make the initial phone call or stroll into the office for your appointment. This group is amazing from start to finish. They own a beautiful, clean office, professional staff and the best ENT physicians in town.
Dr. Thrasher sees my whole family. I’ve also recommended friends and extended family members that own also had an amazing experience. Highly recommend this group. A+”-Erica O.



Kenneth Hsu, M.D.

Dr.

Hsu is a board-certified otolaryngologist who specializes in a wide range of both adult and pediatric disorders involving the ear, nose, throat, face, and sinus. He received his training through one of the best ENT programs in the nation at Washington University in St Louis where he gained extensive experience with every aspects of adult and pediatric sinus surgery, pediatric ENT, otologic and lateral skull base surgery, hearing rehabilitation, nasal/sinus tumors, facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, and head and neck cancer surgery. During his final year of training, he served as chief resident and was awarded the Medical Student Teaching Award.

Born and raised in Dallas, Dr. Hsu graduated valedictorian of Saint Mark’s School of Texas, magna cum laude in Biochemistry at Harvard College, and Alpha Omega Alpha from the University of Texas Medical School in San Antonio. Dr. Hsu has a tremendous family legacy of serving the Greater Dallas community. His wife and his sister are both OB/Gyn doctors in Plano. Dr. Hsu’s dad and uncle are also both otolaryngologists.

What allergy is high today in dallas

His mom is a retired pathologist, and his brother-in-law is a spine surgeon. Dr. Hsu is a classically trained violinist and has a special interest in hearing and the musical arts.




It’s a excellent thought to hold an eye on the predicted pollen counts, particularly if you plan to be outdoors for a endless period of time. (If you are planning to be exterior working around plants or cutting grass, a dust mask can help.)

But even if you see a high pollen count predicted in the newspaper, on a smartphone app or on TV, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will be affected.

There are numerous types of pollen — from diverse kinds of trees, from grass and from a variety of weeds. As a result, a high overall pollen count doesn’t always indicate a strong concentration of the specific pollen to which you’re allergic.

The opposite can be true, too: The pollen count might be low, but you might discover yourself around one of the pollens that triggers your allergies.

Through testing, an allergist can pinpoint which pollens bring on your symptoms. An allergist can also assist you discover relief by determining which medications will work best for your set of triggers.

This sheet was reviewed for accuracy 4/23/2018.

Medications

Many allergens that trigger allergic rhinitis are airborne, so you can’t always avoid them.

If your symptoms can’t be well-controlled by simply avoiding triggers, your allergist may recommend medications that reduce nasal congestion, sneezing, and an itchy and runny nose. They are available in numerous forms — oral tablets, liquid medication, nasal sprays and eyedrops. Some medications may own side effects, so discuss these treatments with your allergist so they can assist you live the life you want.

Nasal sprays

Nonprescription saline nasal sprays will assist counteract symptoms such as dry nasal passages or thick nasal mucus.

Unlike decongestant nasal sprays, a saline nasal spray can be used as often as it is needed. Sometimes an allergist may recommend washing (douching) the nasal passage. There are numerous OTC delivery systems for saline rinses, including neti pots and saline rinse bottles.

Nasal cromolyn blocks the body’s release of allergy-causing substances.

What allergy is high today in dallas

It does not work in every patients. The full dose is four times daily, and improvement of symptoms may take several weeks. Nasal cromolyn can assist prevent allergic nasal reactions if taken prior to an allergen exposure.

Nasal ipratropium bromide spray can assist reduce nasal drainage from allergic rhinitis or some forms of nonallergic rhinitis.

Decongestants

Decongestants assist relieve the stuffiness and pressure caused by swollen nasal tissue.

They do not contain antihistamines, so they do not cause antihistaminic side effects. They do not relieve other symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Oral decongestants are available as prescription and nonprescription medications and are often found in combination with antihistamines or other medications. It is not unusual for patients using decongestants to experience insomnia if they take the medication in the afternoon or evening. If this occurs, a dose reduction may be needed.

At times, men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on decongestants. Patients using medications to manage emotional or behavioral problems should discuss this with their allergist before using decongestants. Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease should check with their allergist before using. Pregnant patients should also check with their allergist before starting decongestants.

Nonprescription decongestant nasal sprays work within minutes and final for hours, but you should not use them for more than a few days at a time unless instructed by your allergist. Prolonged use can cause rhinitis medicamentosa, or rebound swelling of the nasal tissue.

Stopping the use of the decongestant nasal spray will cure that swelling, provided that there is no underlying disorder.

Oral decongestants are found in numerous over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, and may be the treatment of choice for nasal congestion. They don’t cause rhinitis medicamentosa but need to be avoided by some patients with high blood pressure. If you own high blood pressure or heart problems, check with your allergist before using them.

Leukatriene pathway inhibitors

Leukotriene pathway inhibitors (montelukast, zafirlukast and zileuton) block the action of leukotriene, a substance in the body that can cause symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

These drugs are also used to treat asthma.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic rhinitis. These medications counter the effects of histamine, the irritating chemical released within your body when an allergic reaction takes put. Although other chemicals are involved, histamine is primarily responsible for causing the symptoms. Antihistamines are found in eyedrops, nasal sprays and, most commonly, oral tablets and syrup.

Antihistamines assist to relieve nasal allergy symptoms such as:

  1. Eye itching, burning, tearing and redness
  2. Sneezing and an itchy, runny nose
  3. Itchy skin, hives and eczema

There are dozens of antihistamines; some are available over the counter, while others require a prescription.

Patients reply to them in a wide variety of ways.

Generally, the newer (second-generation) products work well and produce only minor side effects. Some people discover that an antihistamine becomes less effective as the allergy season worsens or as their allergies change over time. If you discover that an antihistamine is becoming less effective, tell your allergist, who may recommend a diverse type or strength of antihistamine.

If you own excessive nasal dryness or thick nasal mucus, consult an allergist before taking antihistamines. Contact your allergist for advice if an antihistamine causes drowsiness or other side effects.

Proper use: Short-acting antihistamines can be taken every four to six hours, while timed-release antihistamines are taken every 12 to 24 hours. The short-acting antihistamines are often most helpful if taken 30 minutes before an anticipated exposure to an allergen (such as at a picnic during ragweed season). Timed-release antihistamines are better suited to long-term use for those who need daily medications. Proper use of these drugs is just as significant as their selection.

What allergy is high today in dallas

The most effective way to use them is before symptoms develop. A dose taken early can eliminate the need for numerous later doses to reduce established symptoms. Numerous times a patient will tell that he or she “took one, and it didn’t work.” If the patient had taken the antihistamine regularly for three to four days to build up blood levels of the medication, it might own been effective.

Side effects: Older (first-generation) antihistamines may cause drowsiness or performance impairment, which can lead to accidents and personal injury.

Even when these medications are taken only at bedtime, they can still cause considerable impairment the following day, even in people who do not feel drowsy. For this reason, it is significant that you do not drive a car or work with dangerous machinery when you take a potentially sedating antihistamine.

What allergy is high today in dallas

Some of the newer antihistamines do not cause drowsiness.

A frequent side effect is excessive dryness of the mouth, nose and eyes. Less common side effects include restlessness, nervousness, overexcitability, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, euphoria, fainting, visual disturbances, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distress, constipation, diarrhea, increased or decreased urination, urinary retention, high or low blood pressure, nightmares (especially in children), sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, chest tightness or palpitations. Men with prostate enlargement may encounter urinary problems while on antihistamines. Consult your allergist if these reactions occur.

Important precautions:

  1. Know how the medication affects you before working with heavy machinery, driving or doing other performance-intensive tasks; some products can slow your reaction time.
  2. Do not use more than one antihistamine at a time, unless prescribed.
  3. Some antihistamines appear to be safe to take during pregnancy, but there own not been enough studies to determine the absolute safety of antihistamines in pregnancy.

    Again, consult your allergist or your obstetrician if you must take antihistamines.

  4. Alcohol and tranquilizers increase the sedation side effects of antihistamines.
  5. While antihistamines own been taken safely by millions of people in the final 50 years, don’t take antihistamines before telling your allergist if you are allergic to, or intolerant of, any medicine; are pregnant or intend to become pregnant while using this medication; are breast-feeding; own glaucoma or an enlarged prostate; or are ill.
  6. Keep these medications out of the reach of children.
  7. Follow your allergist’s instructions.
  8. Never take anyone else’s medication.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be recommended for people who don’t reply well to treatment with medications or who experience side effects from medications, who own allergen exposure that is unavoidable or who desire a more permanent solution to their allergies.

Immunotherapy can be extremely effective in controlling allergic symptoms, but it doesn’t assist the symptoms produced by nonallergic rhinitis.

Two types of immunotherapy are available: allergy shots and sublingual (under-the-tongue) tablets.

  1. Allergy shots: A treatment program, which can take three to five years, consists of injections of a diluted allergy extract, istered frequently in increasing doses until a maintenance dose is reached. Then the injection schedule is changed so that the same dose is given with longer intervals between injections. Immunotherapy helps the body build resistance to the effects of the allergen, reduces the intensity of symptoms caused by allergen exposure and sometimes can actually make skin test reactions vanish.

    As resistance develops over several months, symptoms should improve.

  2. Sublingual tablets: This type of immunotherapy was approved by the Food and Drug istration in 2014. Starting several months before allergy season begins, patients dissolve a tablet under the tongue daily. Treatment can continue for as endless as three years. Only a few allergens (certain grass and ragweed pollens and home dust mite) can be treated now with this method, but it is a promising therapy for the future.

Intranasal corticosteroids

Intranasal corticosteroids are the single most effective drug class for treating allergic rhinitis.

They can significantly reduce nasal congestion as well as sneezing, itching and a runny nose.

Ask your allergist about whether these medications are appropriate and safe for you. These sprays are designed to avoid the side effects that may happen from steroids that are taken by mouth or injection. Take care not to spray the medication against the middle portion of the nose (the nasal septum). The most common side effects are local irritation and nasal bleeding. Some older preparations own been shown to own some effect on children’s growth; data about some newer steroids don’t indicate an effect on growth.

Eye allergy preparations and eyedrops

Eye allergy preparations may be helpful when the eyes are affected by the same allergens that trigger rhinitis, causing redness, swelling, watery eyes and itching.

OTC eyedrops and oral medications are commonly used for short-term relief of some eye allergy symptoms. They may not relieve every symptoms, though, and prolonged use of some of these drops may actually cause your condition to worsen.

Prescription eyedrops and oral medications also are used to treat eye allergies. Prescription eyedrops provide both short- and long-term targeted relief of eye allergy symptoms, and can be used to manage them.

Check with your allergist or pharmacist if you are unsure about a specific drug or formula.

It’s a excellent thought to hold an eye on the predicted pollen counts, particularly if you plan to be outdoors for a endless period of time.

(If you are planning to be exterior working around plants or cutting grass, a dust mask can help.)

But even if you see a high pollen count predicted in the newspaper, on a smartphone app or on TV, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will be affected. There are numerous types of pollen — from diverse kinds of trees, from grass and from a variety of weeds. As a result, a high overall pollen count doesn’t always indicate a strong concentration of the specific pollen to which you’re allergic.

The opposite can be true, too: The pollen count might be low, but you might discover yourself around one of the pollens that triggers your allergies.

Through testing, an allergist can pinpoint which pollens bring on your symptoms.

An allergist can also assist you discover relief by determining which medications will work best for your set of triggers.

This sheet was reviewed for accuracy 4/23/2018.

Avoidance

The first approach in managing seasonal or perennial forms of hay fever should be to avoid the allergens that trigger symptoms.

Outdoor exposure

  1. Wear a pollen mask (such as a NIOSH-rated 95 filter mask) when mowing the lawn, raking leaves or gardening, and take appropriate medication beforehand.
  2. Avoid using window fans that can draw pollens and molds into the house.
  3. Wear glasses or sunglasses when outdoors to minimize the quantity of pollen getting into your eyes.
  4. Stay indoors as much as possible when pollen counts are at their peak, generally during the midmorning and early evening (this may vary according to plant pollen), and when wind is blowing pollens around.
  5. Don’t hang clothing outdoors to dry; pollen may cling to towels and sheets.
  6. Try not to rub your eyes; doing so will irritate them and could make your symptoms worse.

Indoor exposure

  1. Reduce exposure to dust mites, especially in the bedroom.

    Use “mite-proof” covers for pillows, comforters and duvets, and mattresses and box springs. Wash your bedding frequently, using boiling water (at least 130 degrees Fahrenheit).

  2. Keep windows closed, and use air conditioning in your car and home. Make certain to hold your air conditioning unit clean.
  3. To limit exposure to mold, hold the humidity in your home low (between 30 and 50 percent) and clean your bathrooms, kitchen and basement regularly. Use a dehumidifier, especially in the basement and in other damp, humid places, and empty and clean it often.

    If mold is visible, clean it with mild detergent and a 5 percent bleach solution as directed by an allergist.

  4. Clean floors with a damp rag or mop, rather than dry-dusting or sweeping.

Exposure to pets

  1. If you are allergic to a household pet, hold the animal out of your home as much as possible. If the pet must be inside, hold it out of the bedroom so you are not exposed to animal allergens while you sleep.
  2. Wash your hands immediately after petting any animals; wash your clothes after visiting friends with pets.
  3. Close the air ducts to your bedroom if you own forced-air or central heating or cooling.

    Replace carpeting with hardwood, tile or linoleum, every of which are easier to hold dander-free.

Treatments that are not recommended for allergic rhinitis

  1. Antibiotics: Effective for the treatment of bacterial infections, antibiotics do not affect the course of uncomplicated common colds (a viral infection) and are of no benefit for noninfectious rhinitis, including allergic rhinitis.
  2. Nasal surgery: Surgery is not a treatment for allergic rhinitis, but it may assist if patients own nasal polyps or chronic sinusitis that is not responsive to antibiotics or nasal steroid sprays.

Gretchen Champion, M.D.

Dr.

Gretchen Champion specializes in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery and treats both pediatric and adult patients with ear, nose, throat and allergy disorders. She is board certified by American Board of Otolaryngology.

Dr. Champion completed her otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency atWashington University in St Louis where she trained atBarnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children’s Hospitals.

While in training, she served as head and neck surgery chief resident and received several awards including the prestigious Head and Neck Surgery Teaching Award from her fellow residents. Prior her surgical residency training, Dr.

What allergy is high today in dallas

Champion obtained her M.D. fromWashington University in St. Louis, where she was an Alpha Omega Alpha honors graduate and received the Robert Carter Award for excellence in research and academics. She graduated with straight A’s from the honors program at theUniversity of Michigan-Ann Arbor.

Dr. Champion is athletic in several professional societies including theAmerican Academy of Otolaryngology and the American Association for Otolaryngic Allergy. Her research interests include neonatal hearing loss, head and neck cancer, and microbiology.

Her clinical interests include pediatric surgery, recurrent tonsillitis, diseases of the salivary glands, sinusitis and hearing loss.

Dr. Champion also focuses on allergic diseases and their role in sinusitis and ear disorders. She has been recognized as a fellow in theAmerican Academy of OtolaryngicAllergy and is the medical director of the Allergy Department. She was featured in Dallas Kid Magazine as a “Mom-Recommended” pediatric ENT. Dr. Champion was also voted by her peers“Best Doctor” in D Magazine from 2009-2019.

Beyond her practice, Dr. Champion served as Chair of the Department of Surgery at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Allen 2011-12.

Dr.

Champion is originally from the Chicagoland area but extremely proud to be a Texan for over ten years. When not working, Dr. Champion enjoys running marathons and spending time with husband and two children.

She performs surgeries atTexas Health Presbyterian Plano,Texas Health Resources at Craig Ranch andChildren’s Medical Middle at Legacy.

“Dr Champion is grand. No excessive wait time to see doctor, pleasant staff.”-John T.



Shane Pahlavan, M.D.

Dr.

Shane Pahlavan works diligently with his patients to determine the optimal course of treatment, formulating a plan that lets them know exactly what to expect.

What allergy is high today in dallas

Board certified and specializing in otolaryngology for both children and adults, Dr. Pahlavan performs cutting-edge balloon sinuplasty in the office that comfortably and easily alleviate chronic sinusitis. Patients appreciate his affable, relatable bedside manner along with his progressive surgical expertise. His clinical specialties include head and neck cancer, thyroid and parathyroid surgery, pediatrics, endoscopic sinus surgery, and ear disorders. He is one of only a handful of surgeons in DFW performing both vagal nerve stimulator surgery for patients with epilepsy (seizure disorder) and hypoglossal stimulator surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

He is a Summa Cum Laude graduate of Baylor University, graduated with Alpha Omega Alpha honors from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, and is certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology. He was elected and served as Chief Resident at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston during residency while training at Texas Children’s Hospital, MD Anderson Cancer Middle, Houston Methodist Hospital, Ben Taub General Hospital, and the VA medical Middle.

His research has been published in multiple medical journals. An avid sports fan, Dr. Pahlavan lives with his wife and three sons in Prosper.

“This group of ENT’s are the absolute best there is. Dr. Pahlavan is outstanding. He is extremely professional and has a grand personality. He is a extremely caring person who really takes the time to address any concerns you own and explains things extremely clearly.

He does not rush you and really puts you at ease. Thank you Dr. Pahlavan.”-Sandy S.



Nimish Patel, M.D.

Dr. Patel is a board-certified otolaryngologist and is one of only a few fellowship-trained rhinologists in the DFW metroplex. Rhinologists specifically get additional training in disorders of the nose and paranasal sinuses including both advanced medical and minimally invasive surgical care.

He has also received additional training in the care of patients with difficult-to-treat allergies. He has performed extensive research and is widely published in the medical literature for his sinus work. Dr. Patel also sees every other patients with ear, nose, and throat disorders including head and neck cancer, thyroid disorders, and ear disease.

A native Texan and a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, Dr. Patel received his medical degree from Texas Tech before completing his residency at the University of Florida.

His fellowship was at the prestigious University of Pittsburgh. Following his training, Dr. Patel returned to Texas to work for Baylor Scott & White as a divisional director of otolaryngology over the Austin area. He has now joined the ENT & Allergy Centers of Texas to be closer to family and join one of the fastest growing practices in North Texas. Dr. Patel lives in McKinney with his wife and 2 children.

“My family and I own both seen Dr. Champion and Dr. Patel and both of them are incredibly knowledgeable in their field.

Both are extremely friendly and take the additional time and steps in order to make our family feel comfortable. Dr. Patel specifically helped me with symptoms that I own been experiencing for 30 years and after the surgery, I can truly tell they own changed my life, because I can finally breathe and live simple again. I cannot thank them enough and I would recommend them to anyone.”-Grace L.



Joshua C.

What allergy is high today in dallas

James, M.D.

Dr. James is native of Plano, TX and graduated from Plano East Senior High School in 1995.

What allergy is high today in dallas

He earned his undergraduate degree in Microbiology from The University of Texas at Austin, graduating with honors. Dr. James completed medical school in 2003 from the University of Texas Health Science Middle in San Antonio, where he remained for his residency training in Otolaryngology. He is board certified by the American Academy of Otolaryngology.

During his residency training, Dr. James completed and published multiple research studies in the field of Voice and Laryngology. He was recognized at the annual Otolaryngology Conference for his efforts in the advancement of laryngeal surgery.

He still holds a special interest in voice disorders and treatment.

Dr. James spends much of his free time serving on the board and volunteering at the Collin County Children’s and Family Health Clinic. He is also the Vice President for the Collin-Fannin Medical Society and currently serves as volunteer medical director for Project Access, a healthcare venue for low-income families with medical needs. Dr. James has a passion for ensuring that quality healthcare is available to every people, and uses that voice as a delegate in the governing body of the Texas Medical Association.

“Dr.

Joshua James is an outstanding physician and surgeon. My entire family sees him and he’s extremely professional, knowledgeable and cordial. I own recommended him to numerous of my friends and they concur. Dr. James is awesome!”-Millie L.



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