What allergies are high today in phoenix

What allergies are high today in phoenix

Treatment Options for Winter Allergy Symptoms

To treat allergy symptoms, Jones cautions against older over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, which, he says, can do more harm than good.

«Some of these drugs own too numerous side effects,» he notes, «and people don’t really understand how to match their symptoms to the product. They just know they feel bad and desire to feel better.»

For example, some OTC allergy drugs contain decongestants, like pseudoephedrine, which can lift a user’s heart rate. The athletic ingredient in the antihistamine Benadryl — diphenhydramine — causes some tissues to dry out and promotes urinary retention, Jones says.

«So people with prostate problems, who may own trouble urinating, discover that that condition worsens when they take diphenhydramine.»

Jones says that better options are decongestants that contain loratadine (such as Claritin) and cetirizine (like Zyrtec), two drugs that moved from prescription to OTC status in recent years. Prescription steroid nasal sprays (some of which are also now available over-the-counter) tend to be more effective than antihistamine tablets, adds Rank, though individual responses vary and the two types of drugs are often used in combination.

Talk to your doctor and your pharmacist before taking any over-the-counter medication, to discuss whether it’s appropriate for your symptoms and potential side effects.

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology notes that if you own a pet allergy, you might consider immunotherapy ­— allergy shots or tablets — that can potentially desensitize you to the allergen and provide lasting relief.

(4)

There’s no contesting that allergy season is annoying AF. You’re supposed to *finally* be running exterior again or picnicking in the park, but instead, you’re stuck inside trying (key word) to breathe through snot and see through watery, itchy eyes.

And if it feels love your allergies own gotten worse the final few years, you’re not incorrect. After a consistent increase in the intensity and length of allergy season over the final several years (you can blame climate change), allergy season 2020 will likely be worse than usual or potentially the most intense and longest yet if the trend continues.

Whomp, whomp.

Allergy symptoms—those watery eyes and stuffy nose, along with sneezing fits, coughing, wheezing, and hive- or eczema-like rashes—happen when your immune system essentially freaks out over an otherwise harmless substance (like pollen). Delightful, huh?

But even if the above symptoms sound every too familiar, there is excellent news: You can fight back against allergies—and the sooner you get started the better. That means knowing when exactly allergy season will start this year, and how to prep your body for any allergen invaders.


Okay, so when does allergy season 2020 start?

Well, it’s technically *always* allergy season due to year-round offenders such as dust mites, mold, and pet dander, says Purvi Parikh, MD, an allergist and immunologist with Allergy & Asthma Network.

But some allergens–pollens, specifically—are seasonal.

Jewelyn Butron

Tree pollen, for example, pops up in the spring (generally in tardy March to April), grass pollen arrives in the tardy spring (around May), weed pollen is most prevalent in the summer (July to August), and ragweed pollen takes over from summer to drop (late August to the first frost), says Dr. Parikh.

And even worse news: Climate change means allergy season begins earlier and lasts longer, adds Corinne Keet, MD, PhD, a professor and allergist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

To get super-specific, Pollen.com has a National Allergy Map that provides an up-to-date allergy forecast in diverse areas around the country and an Allergy Alert app that gives five-day forecasts with in-depth info on specific allergens, helping you decide if you should stay indoors that day.

Certain areas own also seen a particularly large increase in pollen during allergy season.

In 2019, the New York Times reported on the extreme blankets of pollen that hit North Carolina; Georgia and Chicago also faced especially aggressive allergy seasons too.

What allergies are high today in phoenix

In Alaska, temperatures are rising so quickly (as in numerous other far northern countries), that the pollen count and season duration are seeing unprecedented growth.


What can I do if my allergy meds aren’t working…or my allergies are getting worse?

If you’re already taking OTC allergy meds (and, you know, keeping your windows closed and washing your face and hair after coming inside), allergy shots, a.k.a. allergen immunotherapy, make your immune system less reactive to allergens (read: pollen), and for some people, they can even induce a cure, says Dr.

Parikh.

“By giving little increasing doses of what you are allergic to, you train the immune system to slowly stop being as allergic,” she says. “This is the best way to address allergies, as it targets the underlying problem and builds your immunity to a specific allergen.”

The downside?

What allergies are high today in phoenix

Allergy shots are a bit of a time commitment. You’ll need to get them once a week for six to eight months, then once a month for a minimum of two years, says Dr. Parikh. You need to be a little bit patient, too, because it can take about six months to start feeling better (so if you desire protection by March, you’ll probably own to start in September the year before).

What allergies are high today in phoenix

But a life without allergies? Sounds worth it to me.

Cassie ShortsleeveFreelance WriterCassie Shortsleeve is a skilled freelance author and editor with almost a decade of experience reporting on every things health, fitness, and travel.

Kristin CanningKristin Canning is the health editor at Women’s Health, where she assigns, edits and reports stories on emerging health research and technology, women’s health conditions, psychology, mental health, wellness entrepreneurs, and the intersection of health and culture for both print and digital.

Comments

Welcome to our new and improved comments, which are for subscribers only.

This is a test to see whether we can improve the experience for you. You do not need a profile to participate.

You will need to register before adding a comment. Typed comments will be lost if you are not logged in.

Please be courteous. It’s OK to disagree with someone’s ideas, but personal attacks, insults, threats, hate lecture, advocating violence and other violations can result in a ban. If you see comments in violation of our community guidelines, please report them.

Desert Middle for Allergy and Chest Diseases is the only group practice in Arizona that offers comprehensive care in pulmonary medicine, allergy and immunology, and sleep medicine every under one roof.

This enables us to coordinate your care and treat you with a holistic approach, and you don’t own to visit multiple doctors in diverse locations.

Our board-certified physicians own extensive experience in the testing and treatment of chronic cough, asthma, lung infections and tumors, as well as every types of allergies in adults and children, including respiratory, skin, food, and environmental allergies. We also diagnose and treat sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia.

What allergies are high today in phoenix

At our office in Scottsdale / Phoenix, Arizona, we focus on developing strong patient-physician relationships based on personal interest, understanding, cooperation, communication and high quality care. Our providers will explain everything to you regarding your condition, medicine, and treatment in terms you can understand so that you can make informed decisions about the care you get.

For the most comprehensive care of allergies, pulmonary diseases, and sleep disorders in southern Arizona, please call Desert Middle for Allergy and Chest Diseases at (602) 788-7211 and our friendly staff will gladly make an appointment for you.

The quantity of phenoxymethylpenicillin you need depends on your age and how bad the infection is, and whether you’re taking it to treat or prevent an infection.

How much will I take?

For adults and children over 12 years, you’ll generally take:

  1. 500mg 4 times a day — for treating infections
  2. 500mg twice a day — for preventing infections

When to take it

Try to space the doses evenly throughout the day. If you take phenoxymethylpenicillin 4 times a day, this could be first thing in the morning, around midday, tardy afternoon and at bedtime.

If you’re taking it twice a day, leave 12 hours between each dose.

This could be early morning and early evening, at 8am and 8pm.

It’s best not to take phenoxymethylpenicillin at mealtimes. Take it 30 minutes before a meal or at least 2 hours after you own eaten.

What if I forget to take it?

If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember, unless it’s almost time for your next dose.

In this case, just leave out the missed dose and take your next dose as normal.

Never take 2 doses at the same time. Never take an additional dose to make up for a forgotten one.

If you forget doses often, it may assist to set an alarm to remind you.

You could also enquire your pharmacist for advice on other ways to remember your medicines.

How to take it

Swallow phenoxymethylpenicillin tablets whole.

What allergies are high today in phoenix

Do not chew or break them.

The medicine also comes as a liquid for people who discover it hard to swallow tablets.

If you or your kid are taking phenoxymethylpenicillin as a liquid, it’ll generally be made up for you by your pharmacist.

The medicine will come with a plastic syringe or spoon to assist you measure out the correct dose.

If you don’t own one, enquire your pharmacist for one. Do not use a kitchen teaspoon as it will not give the correct amount.

What if I take too much?

Accidentally taking an additional dose of phenoxymethylpenicillin is unlikely to harm you or your child.

Speak to your pharmacist or doctor if you’re worried, or if you take more than 1 additional dose.


What does that mean for my allergy meds?

When should I start taking them?

There’s no point in waiting until you’re miserable to take allergy meds, especially if you desire to hold up your outdoor workouts.

In fact, allergists recommend you start taking meds a couple weeks before allergy season arrives, or, at the latest, take them the moment you start having symptoms, says Dr. Parikh. Taking them early can stop an immune system freak-out before it happens, lessening the severity of symptoms, he adds. Check out the National Allergy Map to figure out when to start taking meds depending on where you live.

As for which allergy meds to take, if you’re seriously stuffed, start with steroid nasal sprays such as Flonase or Rhinocort, which reduce inflammation-induced stuffiness, says Dr.

Keet. And if you’ve got itching, sneezing, and a runny nose, too, glance for non-sedating antihistamines such as Zyrtec, Xyzal, or Allegra, she adds. Just remember: While OTC allergy meds suppress symptoms, they don’t cure the problem, so they may be less effective if your allergies are worsening, notes Dr. Parikh.


RELATED VIDEO: