Silicone allergy what to avoid

Many items are made from latex. These include:

Everyday items

Medical supplies

Balloons

Balls

Pacifiers, bottle nipples

Condoms, diaphragms

Rubber bands

Raincoats, rain boots

Surgical and exam gloves

IV tubing injection sites

Catheters

Bandages

Adhesive tape

Electrode pads

Blood pressure cuffs

Tourniquets

Stethoscopes

Wheelchair tires

There are items that can be used in put of the items that contain latex. They are made from vinyl, plastic, or silicone.


What are the symptoms of a latex allergy?

Symptoms of latex allergy include:

  1. Itchyor watery eyes

  2. Wheezing or whistling sound with breathing

  3. Hives or raised, itchy bumps on the skin

In some cases, severe reactions (anaphylactic shock) can happen and cause:

  1. Trouble breathing

  2. Chest tightness

  3. Swelling of the throat or tongue

Severe reactions need immediate emergency treatment.



What is a latex allergy?

Natural rubber latexis a milky fluid found in rubber trees.

There is a protein in the fluid that can cause allergic reactions in some people. Some gloves, condoms, balloons, rubber bands, erasers, and toys are made using this natural rubber latex. Reactions to latex products happen when it comes in contact with the person’s skin, mucous membranes (like the nostrils,mouth, or rectum), or the bloodstream (during surgery). For example, some people may react when blowing up a rubber balloon or breathing in powder from the inside of latex gloves.

There are 2 types of latex allergy. One type can cause an immediate reaction, love someone with a peanut allergy may own after eating a peanut. The other type, which is much more common, causes a delayed skin rash, similar to a reaction from poison ivy.


If you are allergic to latex

Tips to coping with your latex allergy include the following:

  1. Wear aMedic-Alert bracelet or necklace with information about your allergy.

  2. Tryto avoidall latex products. Use items that do not own latex in them.

  3. Ask yourhealthcare providerabout self-injecting epinephrine (or Epi-pens). Own them at home, in the car, at school,day care, and work.

  4. If you need surgery or a procedure, talk to your healthcare provider about what you can do to prevent exposure and reactions to latex.

  5. Be certain medical and school records own a latex allergy alert.

  6. For a kid with a latex allergy, teach him or herto know and avoid latex products.

  7. Carry a pair of nonlatex gloves with you, information about latex allergies, and/or a note from your healthcare provider.

  8. Know what to do in case of an emergency.

    Discuss this with your child’sprovider and school nurse (for a kid with a latex allergy).

Avoiding latex may decrease the chance of children developing this allergy.

If you are allergic to latex

Tips to coping with your latex allergy include the following:

  1. Wear aMedic-Alert bracelet or necklace with information about your allergy.

  2. Tryto avoidall latex products. Use items that do not own latex in them.

  3. Ask yourhealthcare providerabout self-injecting epinephrine (or Epi-pens).

    Own them at home, in the car, at school,day care, and work.

  4. If you need surgery or a procedure, talk to your healthcare provider about what you can do to prevent exposure and reactions to latex.

  5. Be certain medical and school records own a latex allergy alert.

  6. For a kid with a latex allergy, teach him or herto know and avoid latex products.

  7. Carry a pair of nonlatex gloves with you, information about latex allergies, and/or a note from your healthcare provider.

  8. Know what to do in case of an emergency.

    Discuss this with your child’sprovider and school nurse (for a kid with a latex allergy).

Avoiding latex may decrease the chance of children developing this allergy.

What triggers the allergic reaction to latex?

When people with latex allergy come into direct contact with latex, an allergic reaction may follow. Common examples include:

  1. A medical or dental procedure conducted by health care workers wearing natural rubber latex gloves
  2. Blowing up a rubber balloon

What are latex allergy symptoms?

In most cases, latex allergy develops after numerous previous exposures to latex. Latex allergy symptoms may include hives, itching, stuffy or runny nose.

It can cause asthma symptoms of wheezing, chest tightness and difficulty breathing. Symptoms start within minutes after exposure to latex containing products. The most severe latex allergy can result in anaphylaxis, a serious allergic reaction involving severe breathing difficulty and/or drop in blood pressure (shock).

Allergic skin problems can happen following direct contact with allergic latex proteins in latex glove products. Symptoms may include immediate itching, redness and swelling of skin that touched the item containing latex.

These and other latex allergic reactions are less common now. Numerous hospitals or doctors’ offices own switched to non-latex gloves or low protein latex gloves.

A second type of skin allergy called “allergic contact dermatitis” may be caused by chemicals used to manufacture rubber gloves. This dermatitis is recognized by the eczema and blisters on the back of the hands. It resembles a poison ivy rash, and begins 1 to 3 days after wearing rubber gloves.

Direct physical contact with latex products is not needed to trigger an allergic reaction. Anaphylaxis and severe asthmatic reactions own been caused by inhaling latex proteins in the air resulting from the powder in the latex glove.

What foods are potential problems for people with latex allergy?

If you own latex allergy you also can own food allergies.

The foods most likely to cause this problem include: apple, avocado, banana, carrot, celery, chestnut, kiwi, melons, papaya, raw potato and tomato.

An itchy red rash after using a cosmetic is an obvious sign of an irritant or allergic reaction. But sometimes sensitivity to skincare products can be more insidious and sneaky, causing extreme dryness and flakiness, pimple-like bumps, and uneven skin tone.

These seemingly unrelated skin problems may also be a sign that you are sensitive to the products you're putting on your skin.


Types of Reactions

Dermatitis is the term used to describe any red, itchy, irritation of the skin. When it's caused by something that touches the skin, it's called contact dermatitis.

Silicone allergy what to avoid

Skincare products, makeup, and personal care products love deodorant and shampoo are common causes of contact dermatitis.

Around 80% of every contact dermatitis cases are irritant contact dermatitis.Your skin is irritated or sensitive to something that you've touched. Irritant contact dermatitis can develop quickly after exposure to an offending substance, within a few hours or even minutes. But it can also take days or sometimes weeks for irritation to develop.

Whenever we own a reaction to a product, we often tell that we're "allergic" to it, but this isn't always the case.

By contrast, allergic contact dermatitis is a true allergy to a substance.

In allergic contact dermatitis, the reaction is often more severe with intensely red, itchy, swollen skin. The reaction typically takes about 12 hours to develop and peaks about 48 hours after exposure.


Who is at risk for developing latex allergy?

People who own frequent exposure to latex from medical procedures are at greater risk for developing latex allergy. They include:

  1. Children with spina bifida

  2. Children born with defects of the urinary system

  3. Children or adults who own had numerous surgeries

  4. Healthcare providers

People who own allergies to certain foods may also own latex allergies.

The foods include: bananas, avocados, chestnuts, kiwi, passion fruit, papaya, figs, peaches, nectarines, plums, tomatoes, and celery.


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