Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

Allergic reactions generally happen quickly within a few minutes of exposure to an allergen.

They can cause:

  1. a runny or blocked nose
  2. wheezing and coughing
  3. red, itchy, watery eyes
  4. sneezing
  5. a red, itchy rash
  6. worsening of asthma or eczema symptoms

Most allergic reactions are mild, but occasionally a severe reaction called anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock can happen.

This is a medical emergency and needs urgent treatment.



One in three Britons claims to own an allergy, but a specialist reveals they may own been conned by New Age clap-trap

Updated:

Childhood and adult allergies  in Britain are rising dramatically every year.

So just what’s making us itch and sneeze? We asked allergy expert  DR ADRIAN MORRIS to hold a diary for a week. Here,  in a revealing account, he sorts  the genuine sufferers from the worried well.

MONDAY
Monday morning at my London clinic, and a flustered-looking lady in her 40s arrives complaining she is allergic to her new puppy.

Whenever she gets shut to or even sees the dog, she says her chest tightens and she can’t breathe.

Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

She has no history of allergy and when I test her for dog allergy — with a blood test and a skin-prick test, where a little quantity of each suspected allergen is placed on her skin and then punctured with a lancet — she is clear.

She does reveal she has a history of anxiety disorder, but when I propose that the route of her symptoms could be psychological, she becomes mad and defensive and ends our session.

But is it real?: A leading specialist in the field of allergies reveals numerous of us don’t own the allergies we ponder we do

The following week, I get a letter from her saying she went to an alternative practitioner subsequently, who told her she does own a dog allergy.

She has got rid of the dog and feels much better.

This is frustrating but not unusual: a number of patients I see own self-diagnosed an allergy mistakenly and then had it supposedly confirmed by an alternative practitioner.

This bogus allergy testing causes a lot of unnecessary anxiety and can be extremely dangerous if a genuine allergy is missed. The fact this lady feels better after getting rid of her dog just shows what a strong psychosomatic component there can sometimes be to supposed allergic reactions.

Next, a man in his early 40s comes in with severe hay fever.

He is typical of the profile for this condition: it isn’t understood why, but this allergy is more common in men from affluent backgrounds.

His itchy eyes, runny nose and sneezing are making life a distress and his medication isn’t working. He’s also noticed that certain foods including apples, celery and hazelnuts make his mouth itch.

A skin-prick test shows he has a strong allergic reaction to birch pollen. I’m not surprised: apples, celery and hazelnuts every contain a protein that’s similar to the pollen he is allergic to.

However, I reassure him he is simply ‘sensitive’ to these foods rather than highly allergic (it’s a matter of degree), and he can safely eat them in cooked form.

I recommend a non-sedating antihistamine tablet and nasal spray, to be used regularly during tree pollen season from March to April.

I’m convinced his current medication isn’t working properly because he isn’t using it regularly enough.

TUESDAY
In the past 40 to 50 years, childhood allergies own risen sharply — in the Sixties, peanut allergy was unheard of, whereas now it’s fairly commonplace.

Some experts, myself included, believe this is due to the ‘hygiene hypothesis’. This says the higher up the social chain you are, the more protected you are from bacteria — as a result, your immune system starts to fight harmless substances such as dust mites.

Certainly, most of my kid patients come from middle-class families and spend a lot of time indoors.

When my children were growing up, I was careful to urge them to muck around outdoors, and put our family cat in their cots occasionally.

Today, at my Surrey clinic, I see a three-year-old girl with severe eczema, asthma and food allergies, with her parents. Peanuts cause her an anaphylactic reaction: quick swelling of her face and throat, affecting her breathing.

At our final appointment, I sent off a blood test.

On the NHS it can take up to three weeks to get these test results back, but private patients can get them back in a few days.

The results confirm she has a severe peanut allergy. We discuss how they can avoid peanuts in food. I also prescribe an EpiPen for them to carry, which will ister a shot of adrenaline in case of a severe reaction, and advise her parents to use her hydrocortisone cream more consistently, for seven days at a time on her eczema.

These creams are safe to use endless term, but seven-day continuous therapy followed by a break seems most effective.

It’s a bad sign her allergies to milk and eggs are also still present at three — most children would own grown out of these by this age, as the immune system matures.

Half of children with allergies outgrow them by their teens.

WEDNESDAY
In London, a 36-year-old man comes to see me with a red and itchy rash around his nose, cheeks and forehead. He also suffers with the irritation around his bottom. I can tell it’s seborrhoeic dermatitis, a common fungus-related rash (but not an allergy).

He’s so embarrassed about it that he’s never been to his GP and instead suffered in silence for years. I prescribe an antifungal cream which, he tells me a week later, clears the problem.

Many men wait years before consulting anybody with symptoms, hoping they will go away — and often a short course of treatment is every that’s needed.

Wheat and dairy are ‘trendy allergies’ says Dr Morris. A wheat allergy could simply be mild IBS

Later, a mom and teenage daughter reach who both tell they own been suffering lethargy and exhaustion.

They’ve used a High Highway allergy test called a Vega — where a practitioner uses a computer to ‘measure’ your response to diverse foods and substances, held in glass vials, without the substance touching the skin.

It diagnosed them both with allergies to a host of foods including wheat, yeast, sugar and dairy.

And so they’ve cut them out — unsurprising, then, that they’re lacking in energy.

Wheat and dairy own become ‘trendy’ allergies that celebrities are often reputed to suffer from.

In fact, only three per cent of the population own a genuine food allergy — while 30 per cent believe they own one.

This mom and daughter don’t own an allergy; they probably own mild irritable bowel syndrome.

THURSDAY
Some excellent news at my afternoon clinic in Guildford.

Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

I’m pleased to be capable to tell the parents of a seven-year-old boy that he no longer has an egg allergy (in the past, eggs had caused a rash around his mouth, hives every over his body, and a swollen tongue).

We observe as he eats a piece of hard-boiled egg, then a soft-boiled egg and, finally, an almost raw egg — the most allergic because heat and cooking reduce the level of allergens present in foods. He is every clear — he has simply grown out of it. The relief of his parents is palpable.

Next is a one-year-old girl with a severe case of eczema every over her face, arms and legs. Asian and Afro-Caribbean people own a higher incidence of allergies such as eczema, and her dad, who is Asian, also suffers from it.

Children with eczema own a sensitivity to the staphylococcus bacteria we every carry on our skin. I prescribe a short course of oral antibiotics to clear the staph bacteria and a steroid/antibiotic mixture cream.

I also recommend an oil-based emollient. Misguided GPs are still often prescribing aqueous cream, which is grand as a soap, but shouldn’t be used as a treatment — left on the skin it can exacerbate eczema.

The relax of the day brings the usual stir of red herrings and genuine allergies. I see more allergies to tropical fruits love mango and kiwi, reflecting our more diverse eating habits — these allergies never would own been a problem before we started eating exotic fruit.

Sulphite allergies are also on the rise because it’s used as a preservative in processed foods and ready meals, and can trigger hives and asthma.

FRIDAY

Pseudo-science?

Numerous companies own convincing arguments that mercury fillings are toxic. Probably not, says Dr Morris

A lady comes for her appointment at my London clinic, convinced her low mood, tiredness and difficulty sleeping is below to a ‘toxic reaction’ to the heavy metals present in her body.

This is every thanks to a visit to an alternative practitioner, who said she has dangerously high levels of mercury, titanium and aluminium in her system.

As a result, she has been recommended to own every her metal fillings removed and replaced with new ‘non-toxic’ ones.

This is the sort of thing that makes me really mad.

Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

Truly ‘toxic’ levels of heavy metals in the body are in reality highly unusual: there is likely to be no harm in mercury fillings, for example.

However, numerous companies own extremely convincing, pseudo-scientific websites and vulnerable people love this lady, whom I believe is probably clinically depressed, are their prey.

I do my best to convince her of this. But, no doubt, she will pay an unscrupulous dentist thousands of pounds to do the job.

And finally, a 31-year-old man whose hay fever is so bad he has to take time off work, and avoids going anywhere green.

As steroid and antihistamine treatments seem ineffective, he is a excellent candidate for desensitisation treatments such as Grazax.

This is a new approach in which a little quantity of the allergen (in this case grass pollen) is given in tablet form, starting a couple of months before the start of the hay fever season and throughout it. I own found this to be effective for around 70 per cent of my severely grass-pollen allergic patients.

Unfortunately, the NHS will rarely fund this treatment, but numerous patients are happy to pay for it privately (around £400 for a six-month treatment course) as the benefits can be impressive.

Dr Adrian Morris runs three clinics (allergy-clinic.co.uk) and also works part time within the NHS at the Royal Brompton Hospital in London.

GOT HAY FEVER?

DR MORRIS SHOWS YOU WHAT TO DO…

TWO WEEKS BEFORE THE SEASON
Start to take your antihistamine medication to give the chemical a chance to build up in your body.

In the case of grass pollen allergy, this will be mid-April.
If your symptoms are not severe, an antihistamine should be enough to control hay fever — excellent old-fashioned, non-sedating cetirizine is my favourite. Generic versions are available from Boots (£4.07 for 14) and Superdrug. Experiment — if one isn’t effective, after a month, attempt a new one.

WHEN THE SEASON BEGINS
If antihistamine isn’t enough, start using anti-allergy eyedrops — glance for those containing saline/cromoglycate such as Optrex Allergy Eye Drops (£5.99 for 10ml).

Saline nasal douches such as Sterimar (£6.63 for 100ml) also assist flush pollen away.

Low-dose steroid nasal sprays such as Beconase (£4.28 for 100 sprays) and Flixonase Allergy are also useful and assist more persistent symptoms when used in conjunction with cetirizine regularly.

If your symptoms are occasional or mild, use as and when you feel the need. Otherwise, use every day throughout the season.

Nasal wax is a excellent alternative for those who don’t desire to use drugs. It’s designed for hay fever sufferers and is available from chemists. Rubbed around the nostrils, it can assist to ‘trap’ pollen before it can get up your nose, otherwise, Vaseline (£1.32 for 20g) is just as good.

Other options of the non-pharmaceutical variety include the natural remedy butterbur, which has been found in some studies to be as effective as an antihistamine.

There is some evidence that taking a spoonful of local honey in advance of the start of the hay fever season can help.

You can also control hay fever by showering when you come in from exterior to remove pollen from your hair and skin.

When is an allergy not an allergy?

Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

Severe reactions to peanuts are on the rise, but only three per cent of Britons are actually allergic to foodstuffs, says the expert

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Is your allergy genuine or just an over-reaction?

Tis the season to be jolly! Spring, summer, and drop is a time of change, a time to purchase a new wardrobe, plant a garden, or just get out of the home to enjoy the magnificent weather.

Most of us love this time of the year, with colorful flowers blooming, the sounds of chirping birds, and the sight and smell of unused cut green grass. For others, though, it is not so pleasant, as it brings on seasonal allergies, often involving stuffy noses and itchy eyes.

As the seasons change, especially in the spring and drop, seasonal allergies are in full effect, and put a damper on the beauty of the sun shining and flowers blooming. 35 million Americans suffer from allergies year-round, which often brings them into their allergist with teary, swollen and itchy eyes, with the sniffles and stuffy noses.

Seasonal allergies can be extremely debilitating, hindering day-to-day activities, often causing congestion, drowsiness, and fatigue, due to the high pollen counts in the air.

Simply put, an allergy is an overreaction of the immune system to certain substances that are considered foreign to our bodies. In other words, this allergic reaction, or allergies are caused when allergens such as pollen or dust enters the body, and the immune system classifies it as a foreign substance, and aims to remove it from the body, causing the IgA allergy-specific antibodies called immunoglobulins, to overact.

Thus, this reaction causes symptoms of itching, inflammation of the skin and eyes, and often breathing and respiratory issues.

Other symptoms of seasonal allergies include:

  1. Sore throat
  2. Eye irritation
  3. Facial pressure or pain
  4. Weakened immune system
  5. What you are allergic to can change over time: What you are allergic to can always change over time. Receiving allergy shots can make you develop immunity to a specific allergen that you were allergic to before. Allergies don’t vanish, but your body is always reacting differently depending on the environment you are in.

    Always get checked out by your allergist.

  6. Headaches
  7. General feeling of being unwell (Similar to a freezing but without the fever)
  8. Fatigue
  9. Ear infections
  10. Runny or itchy nose
  11. Impaired sense of smell and taste
  12. Wheezing
  13. Muscle aches and pains
  14. Allergy shots are not considered the only long-term solution: Allergy shots or immunotherapy used to be the only successful long-term solution, but then sublingual tablets were introduced. These tablets dissolve under your tongue, and should be taken once-a-day before and during allergy season.

    These tablets purpose to desensitize your body to specific allergens by introducing them into your body in tiny amounts, and over time, your immune system builds up a tolerance to protect your body from these allergens, thus preventing symptoms. Taking the tablets is now considered more convenient than having to go to a doctor for weekly or monthly allergy shots. However, allergy shots are still a excellent option as well.

  15. Trouble sleeping
  16. Antihistamines are your best friend: During allergy season, make antihistamines your best friend.

    As the name sounds, antihistamines are there to block the histamine before it takes effect, causing an allergic reaction. Research shows that it is more effective to attempt to prevent allergy symptoms than to attempt to eliminate them. Histamine is a chemical released to attempt and protect the immune system, but by the time the person has already had an allergic reaction, with symptoms such as nasal congestion, itching and sneezing, histamines are already present.

    Therefore, allergists recommend taking antihistamines before you know the time when your allergy symptoms appear.

    Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

    While antihistamines do assist with symptoms of sneezing and itchiness, they generally don’t assist with nasal stuffiness. Relieve your stuffiness with a nasal steroid spray along with the antihistamines.

  17. Nasal congestion
  18. Loss of concentration
  19. Allergies can cause asthma: Allergies are commonly linked to asthma, which numerous people don’t know. During allergy season, people are diagnosed with allergic asthma, and are often treated with steroid inhalers. Conversely, those with asthma will experience symptom flare-ups if allergies are not kept in check.

Did you know that the liver plays a substantial role in reducing the effect a potential allergen will own on the body?

Our liver purifies and filters about two quarts of blood per minute, extracting most viruses, bacteria, environmental toxins, before recirculating healthy blood through the relax of the body. Seasonal allergies happen as a result of an overloaded toxic state within the liver.

The liver has multiple functions for the body, and is responsible for processing everything we come in contact with. If the quantity of a substance entering the bloodstream is too much for the liver to process, the immune system becomes overstimulated, and recognizes it as being an allergen. The liver then produces and stores allergy-specific antibodies called immunoglobulins.

These antibodies set off a reaction, and the release of too numerous inflammatory chemicals or hormones called histamines causes an allergic reaction, with a host of physical symptoms.

Now that you know the cause of seasonal allergies, here are some things you may not know:

  • Antihistamines are your best friend: During allergy season, make antihistamines your best friend. As the name sounds, antihistamines are there to block the histamine before it takes effect, causing an allergic reaction.

    Research shows that it is more effective to attempt to prevent allergy symptoms than to attempt to eliminate them. Histamine is a chemical released to attempt and protect the immune system, but by the time the person has already had an allergic reaction, with symptoms such as nasal congestion, itching and sneezing, histamines are already present. Therefore, allergists recommend taking antihistamines before you know the time when your allergy symptoms appear. While antihistamines do assist with symptoms of sneezing and itchiness, they generally don’t assist with nasal stuffiness. Relieve your stuffiness with a nasal steroid spray along with the antihistamines.

  • Allergy shots are not considered the only long-term solution: Allergy shots or immunotherapy used to be the only successful long-term solution, but then sublingual tablets were introduced.

    These tablets dissolve under your tongue, and should be taken once-a-day before and during allergy season. These tablets purpose to desensitize your body to specific allergens by introducing them into your body in tiny amounts, and over time, your immune system builds up a tolerance to protect your body from these allergens, thus preventing symptoms. Taking the tablets is now considered more convenient than having to go to a doctor for weekly or monthly allergy shots. However, allergy shots are still a excellent option as well.

  • What you are allergic to can change over time: What you are allergic to can always change over time.

    Receiving allergy shots can make you develop immunity to a specific allergen that you were allergic to before.

    Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

    Allergies don’t vanish, but your body is always reacting differently depending on the environment you are in. Always get checked out by your allergist.

  • Weakened immune system
  • Runny or itchy nose
  • Wheezing
  • Allergies can cause asthma: Allergies are commonly linked to asthma, which numerous people don’t know. During allergy season, people are diagnosed with allergic asthma, and are often treated with steroid inhalers.

    Conversely, those with asthma will experience symptom flare-ups if allergies are not kept in check.

  • Loss of concentration
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Ear infections
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Facial pressure or pain
  • General feeling of being unwell (Similar to a freezing but without the fever)
  • Muscle aches and pains
  • Allergy shots are not considered the only long-term solution: Allergy shots or immunotherapy used to be the only successful long-term solution, but then sublingual tablets were introduced. These tablets dissolve under your tongue, and should be taken once-a-day before and during allergy season.

    These tablets purpose to desensitize your body to specific allergens by introducing them into your body in tiny amounts, and over time, your immune system builds up a tolerance to protect your body from these allergens, thus preventing symptoms. Taking the tablets is now considered more convenient than having to go to a doctor for weekly or monthly allergy shots. However, allergy shots are still a excellent option as well.

  • Antihistamines are your best friend: During allergy season, make antihistamines your best friend. As the name sounds, antihistamines are there to block the histamine before it takes effect, causing an allergic reaction.

    Research shows that it is more effective to attempt to prevent allergy symptoms than to attempt to eliminate them. Histamine is a chemical released to attempt and protect the immune system, but by the time the person has already had an allergic reaction, with symptoms such as nasal congestion, itching and sneezing, histamines are already present. Therefore, allergists recommend taking antihistamines before you know the time when your allergy symptoms appear. While antihistamines do assist with symptoms of sneezing and itchiness, they generally don’t assist with nasal stuffiness.

    Relieve your stuffiness with a nasal steroid spray along with the antihistamines.

  • Sore throat
  • Nasal congestion
  • Impaired sense of smell and taste
  • What you are allergic to can change over time: What you are allergic to can always change over time. Receiving allergy shots can make you develop immunity to a specific allergen that you were allergic to before. Allergies don’t vanish, but your body is always reacting differently depending on the environment you are in. Always get checked out by your allergist.
  • Eye irritation
  • Allergies can cause asthma: Allergies are commonly linked to asthma, which numerous people don’t know.

    During allergy season, people are diagnosed with allergic asthma, and are often treated with steroid inhalers. Conversely, those with asthma will experience symptom flare-ups if allergies are not kept in check.

It’s time to put the distress of allergies behind you. Schedule an appointment with Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Associates of Tampa at one of our convenient Tampa Bay locations today, by calling (813) 971-9743, or use our online appointment request form.

Filed Under: Allergic Rhinitis, Allergy, Allergy Specialists, Allergy Tampa, AsthmaTagged With: allergies, Immune System, respiratory issues, Seasonal Allergies, symptoms, Treatment

What Causes my Symptoms?

A food allergy is the result of your body’s immune system overreacting to food proteins called allergens.

Normally, your immune system and defense mechanisms hold you healthy by fighting off infections and inactivating proteins such as food allergens, which could potentially cause allergic reactions. Therefore, the majority of people develop a tolerance to a wide variety of diverse foods in their diet.

In the individual with food allergy, the immune system produces increased amounts of immunoglobulin E antibody, or IgE. When these antibodies battle with food allergens, histamine and other chemicals are released as part of the body’s immune reaction to these substances.

These chemicals can cause blood vessels to widen, smooth muscles to contract, and affected skin areas to become red, itchy and swollen. These IgE antibodies can be found in diverse body tissues — skin, intestines and lungs — where specific allergy symptoms, such as hives, vomiting, diarrhea and wheezing are observed.

Not every adverse reactions to foods are due to allergy. Some reactions to cow’s milk, for example, are related to a deficiency of an enzyme (lactase) that normally breaks below a sugar in milk (lactose). When individuals with lactase deficiency drink cow’s milk or eat other dairy products, they may experience intestinal symptoms, including stomach cramping, gas and diarrhea.

This is sometimes misinterpreted as a food allergy.

How Do Allergists Determine Which Foods Make Me Sick?

Some people know exactly what food causes their allergic symptoms. They eat peanuts or a peanut-containing product and immediately break out with hives. Other individuals need their allergist’s assist in determining the «culprit», especially when the specific food cannot be identified or when the symptoms show up numerous hours after ingesting an offending food.

Your allergist-immunologist will typically start by taking a comprehensive medical history. Specifically, you’ll be asked about the symptoms you experience following the food ingestion, how endless after the food ingestion they occurred, how much of the offending food was ingested, how often the reaction has occurred and what type of medical treatment, if any, was required.

Moreover, you will be asked about your overall diet, your family’s medical history and your home environment.

These questions are necessary because your allergist wants to eliminate the possibility that another problem or allergic condition may be causing or adding to your symptoms. For example, a patient’s allergy to inhalant pollen such as ragweed may be related to allergic symptoms in the mouth and throat following the ingestion of certain melons, such as watermelon, cantaloupe or honeydew.

What Is Food Allergy Testing?

You may be asked to undergo some allergy testing. Your allergist-immunologist may employ skin testing, in which a diluted quantity of the appropriate food extract is placed on the skin and the skin is then lightly punctured.

This procedure is safe and generally not painful. Within 15 to 20 minutes, a positive reaction typically appears as a raised bump surrounded by redness, similar to a mosquito bite, and indicates the presence of allergic, or IgE, antibodies to the specific food. In some cases, an allergy (IgE) blood test can be used to provide similar information to that obtained by the skin test. The IgE blood test is generally more expensive than skin testing and the results are generally not available for one to two weeks.

If properly performed and interpreted, skin tests or IgE blood tests to foods are dependable and excellent screening tests for food allergy.

However, it’s entirely possible to test «allergic» to a food (by skin testing or IgE blood testing) and yet own no symptoms when that food is eaten. Thus, confirmation requires appropriately designed oral challenge testing with each suspected food.

Is your allergy genuine or just an over-reaction?

Tis the season to be jolly! Spring, summer, and drop is a time of change, a time to purchase a new wardrobe, plant a garden, or just get out of the home to enjoy the magnificent weather.

Most of us love this time of the year, with colorful flowers blooming, the sounds of chirping birds, and the sight and smell of unused cut green grass. For others, though, it is not so pleasant, as it brings on seasonal allergies, often involving stuffy noses and itchy eyes.

As the seasons change, especially in the spring and drop, seasonal allergies are in full effect, and put a damper on the beauty of the sun shining and flowers blooming.

35 million Americans suffer from allergies year-round, which often brings them into their allergist with teary, swollen and itchy eyes, with the sniffles and stuffy noses. Seasonal allergies can be extremely debilitating, hindering day-to-day activities, often causing congestion, drowsiness, and fatigue, due to the high pollen counts in the air.

Simply put, an allergy is an overreaction of the immune system to certain substances that are considered foreign to our bodies. In other words, this allergic reaction, or allergies are caused when allergens such as pollen or dust enters the body, and the immune system classifies it as a foreign substance, and aims to remove it from the body, causing the IgA allergy-specific antibodies called immunoglobulins, to overact.

Thus, this reaction causes symptoms of itching, inflammation of the skin and eyes, and often breathing and respiratory issues.

Other symptoms of seasonal allergies include:

  1. Sore throat
  2. Eye irritation
  3. Facial pressure or pain
  4. Weakened immune system
  5. What you are allergic to can change over time: What you are allergic to can always change over time.

    Receiving allergy shots can make you develop immunity to a specific allergen that you were allergic to before. Allergies don’t vanish, but your body is always reacting differently depending on the environment you are in. Always get checked out by your allergist.

  6. Headaches
  7. General feeling of being unwell (Similar to a freezing but without the fever)
  8. Fatigue
  9. Ear infections
  10. Runny or itchy nose
  11. Impaired sense of smell and taste
  12. Wheezing
  13. Muscle aches and pains
  14. Allergy shots are not considered the only long-term solution: Allergy shots or immunotherapy used to be the only successful long-term solution, but then sublingual tablets were introduced.

    These tablets dissolve under your tongue, and should be taken once-a-day before and during allergy season. These tablets purpose to desensitize your body to specific allergens by introducing them into your body in tiny amounts, and over time, your immune system builds up a tolerance to protect your body from these allergens, thus preventing symptoms. Taking the tablets is now considered more convenient than having to go to a doctor for weekly or monthly allergy shots.

    However, allergy shots are still a excellent option as well.

  15. Trouble sleeping
  16. Antihistamines are your best friend: During allergy season, make antihistamines your best friend. As the name sounds, antihistamines are there to block the histamine before it takes effect, causing an allergic reaction. Research shows that it is more effective to attempt to prevent allergy symptoms than to attempt to eliminate them. Histamine is a chemical released to attempt and protect the immune system, but by the time the person has already had an allergic reaction, with symptoms such as nasal congestion, itching and sneezing, histamines are already present.

    Therefore, allergists recommend taking antihistamines before you know the time when your allergy symptoms appear. While antihistamines do assist with symptoms of sneezing and itchiness, they generally don’t assist with nasal stuffiness. Relieve your stuffiness with a nasal steroid spray along with the antihistamines.

  17. Nasal congestion
  18. Loss of concentration
  19. Allergies can cause asthma: Allergies are commonly linked to asthma, which numerous people don’t know. During allergy season, people are diagnosed with allergic asthma, and are often treated with steroid inhalers.

    Conversely, those with asthma will experience symptom flare-ups if allergies are not kept in check.

Did you know that the liver plays a substantial role in reducing the effect a potential allergen will own on the body? Our liver purifies and filters about two quarts of blood per minute, extracting most viruses, bacteria, environmental toxins, before recirculating healthy blood through the relax of the body. Seasonal allergies happen as a result of an overloaded toxic state within the liver.

The liver has multiple functions for the body, and is responsible for processing everything we come in contact with. If the quantity of a substance entering the bloodstream is too much for the liver to process, the immune system becomes overstimulated, and recognizes it as being an allergen.

The liver then produces and stores allergy-specific antibodies called immunoglobulins. These antibodies set off a reaction, and the release of too numerous inflammatory chemicals or hormones called histamines causes an allergic reaction, with a host of physical symptoms.

Now that you know the cause of seasonal allergies, here are some things you may not know:

It’s time to put the distress of allergies behind you. Schedule an appointment with Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Associates of Tampa at one of our convenient Tampa Bay locations today, by calling (813) 971-9743, or use our online appointment request form.

Filed Under: Allergic Rhinitis, Allergy, Allergy Specialists, Allergy Tampa, AsthmaTagged With: allergies, Immune System, respiratory issues, Seasonal Allergies, symptoms, Treatment

What Causes my Symptoms?

A food allergy is the result of your body’s immune system overreacting to food proteins called allergens.

Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

Normally, your immune system and defense mechanisms hold you healthy by fighting off infections and inactivating proteins such as food allergens, which could potentially cause allergic reactions. Therefore, the majority of people develop a tolerance to a wide variety of diverse foods in their diet.

In the individual with food allergy, the immune system produces increased amounts of immunoglobulin E antibody, or IgE. When these antibodies battle with food allergens, histamine and other chemicals are released as part of the body’s immune reaction to these substances.

These chemicals can cause blood vessels to widen, smooth muscles to contract, and affected skin areas to become red, itchy and swollen. These IgE antibodies can be found in diverse body tissues — skin, intestines and lungs — where specific allergy symptoms, such as hives, vomiting, diarrhea and wheezing are observed.

Not every adverse reactions to foods are due to allergy. Some reactions to cow’s milk, for example, are related to a deficiency of an enzyme (lactase) that normally breaks below a sugar in milk (lactose). When individuals with lactase deficiency drink cow’s milk or eat other dairy products, they may experience intestinal symptoms, including stomach cramping, gas and diarrhea.

This is sometimes misinterpreted as a food allergy.

How Do Allergists Determine Which Foods Make Me Sick?

Some people know exactly what food causes their allergic symptoms. They eat peanuts or a peanut-containing product and immediately break out with hives. Other individuals need their allergist’s assist in determining the «culprit», especially when the specific food cannot be identified or when the symptoms show up numerous hours after ingesting an offending food.

Your allergist-immunologist will typically start by taking a comprehensive medical history. Specifically, you’ll be asked about the symptoms you experience following the food ingestion, how endless after the food ingestion they occurred, how much of the offending food was ingested, how often the reaction has occurred and what type of medical treatment, if any, was required.

Moreover, you will be asked about your overall diet, your family’s medical history and your home environment.

These questions are necessary because your allergist wants to eliminate the possibility that another problem or allergic condition may be causing or adding to your symptoms. For example, a patient’s allergy to inhalant pollen such as ragweed may be related to allergic symptoms in the mouth and throat following the ingestion of certain melons, such as watermelon, cantaloupe or honeydew.

What Is Food Allergy Testing?

You may be asked to undergo some allergy testing.

Your allergist-immunologist may employ skin testing, in which a diluted quantity of the appropriate food extract is placed on the skin and the skin is then lightly punctured. This procedure is safe and generally not painful. Within 15 to 20 minutes, a positive reaction typically appears as a raised bump surrounded by redness, similar to a mosquito bite, and indicates the presence of allergic, or IgE, antibodies to the specific food. In some cases, an allergy (IgE) blood test can be used to provide similar information to that obtained by the skin test.

The IgE blood test is generally more expensive than skin testing and the results are generally not available for one to two weeks.

If properly performed and interpreted, skin tests or IgE blood tests to foods are dependable and excellent screening tests for food allergy. However, it’s entirely possible to test «allergic» to a food (by skin testing or IgE blood testing) and yet own no symptoms when that food is eaten. Thus, confirmation requires appropriately designed oral challenge testing with each suspected food.

Is your allergy genuine or just an over-reaction?

Tis the season to be jolly!

Spring, summer, and drop is a time of change, a time to purchase a new wardrobe, plant a garden, or just get out of the home to enjoy the magnificent weather. Most of us love this time of the year, with colorful flowers blooming, the sounds of chirping birds, and the sight and smell of unused cut green grass. For others, though, it is not so pleasant, as it brings on seasonal allergies, often involving stuffy noses and itchy eyes.

As the seasons change, especially in the spring and drop, seasonal allergies are in full effect, and put a damper on the beauty of the sun shining and flowers blooming.

35 million Americans suffer from allergies year-round, which often brings them into their allergist with teary, swollen and itchy eyes, with the sniffles and stuffy noses. Seasonal allergies can be extremely debilitating, hindering day-to-day activities, often causing congestion, drowsiness, and fatigue, due to the high pollen counts in the air.

Simply put, an allergy is an overreaction of the immune system to certain substances that are considered foreign to our bodies. In other words, this allergic reaction, or allergies are caused when allergens such as pollen or dust enters the body, and the immune system classifies it as a foreign substance, and aims to remove it from the body, causing the IgA allergy-specific antibodies called immunoglobulins, to overact.

Thus, this reaction causes symptoms of itching, inflammation of the skin and eyes, and often breathing and respiratory issues.

Other symptoms of seasonal allergies include:

  1. Sore throat
  2. Eye irritation
  3. Facial pressure or pain
  4. Weakened immune system
  5. What you are allergic to can change over time: What you are allergic to can always change over time. Receiving allergy shots can make you develop immunity to a specific allergen that you were allergic to before. Allergies don’t vanish, but your body is always reacting differently depending on the environment you are in.

    Always get checked out by your allergist.

  6. Headaches
  7. General feeling of being unwell (Similar to a freezing but without the fever)
  8. Fatigue
  9. Ear infections
  10. Runny or itchy nose
  11. Impaired sense of smell and taste
  12. Wheezing
  13. Muscle aches and pains
  14. Allergy shots are not considered the only long-term solution: Allergy shots or immunotherapy used to be the only successful long-term solution, but then sublingual tablets were introduced. These tablets dissolve under your tongue, and should be taken once-a-day before and during allergy season.

    These tablets purpose to desensitize your body to specific allergens by introducing them into your body in tiny amounts, and over time, your immune system builds up a tolerance to protect your body from these allergens, thus preventing symptoms. Taking the tablets is now considered more convenient than having to go to a doctor for weekly or monthly allergy shots. However, allergy shots are still a excellent option as well.

  15. Trouble sleeping
  16. Antihistamines are your best friend: During allergy season, make antihistamines your best friend.

    As the name sounds, antihistamines are there to block the histamine before it takes effect, causing an allergic reaction. Research shows that it is more effective to attempt to prevent allergy symptoms than to attempt to eliminate them. Histamine is a chemical released to attempt and protect the immune system, but by the time the person has already had an allergic reaction, with symptoms such as nasal congestion, itching and sneezing, histamines are already present. Therefore, allergists recommend taking antihistamines before you know the time when your allergy symptoms appear.

    While antihistamines do assist with symptoms of sneezing and itchiness, they generally don’t assist with nasal stuffiness. Relieve your stuffiness with a nasal steroid spray along with the antihistamines.

  17. Nasal congestion
  18. Loss of concentration
  19. Allergies can cause asthma: Allergies are commonly linked to asthma, which numerous people don’t know. During allergy season, people are diagnosed with allergic asthma, and are often treated with steroid inhalers.

    Conversely, those with asthma will experience symptom flare-ups if allergies are not kept in check.

Did you know that the liver plays a substantial role in reducing the effect a potential allergen will own on the body? Our liver purifies and filters about two quarts of blood per minute, extracting most viruses, bacteria, environmental toxins, before recirculating healthy blood through the relax of the body.

Seasonal allergies happen as a result of an overloaded toxic state within the liver.

The liver has multiple functions for the body, and is responsible for processing everything we come in contact with. If the quantity of a substance entering the bloodstream is too much for the liver to process, the immune system becomes overstimulated, and recognizes it as being an allergen. The liver then produces and stores allergy-specific antibodies called immunoglobulins. These antibodies set off a reaction, and the release of too numerous inflammatory chemicals or hormones called histamines causes an allergic reaction, with a host of physical symptoms.

Now that you know the cause of seasonal allergies, here are some things you may not know:

  • Antihistamines are your best friend: During allergy season, make antihistamines your best friend.

    As the name sounds, antihistamines are there to block the histamine before it takes effect, causing an allergic reaction. Research shows that it is more effective to attempt to prevent allergy symptoms than to attempt to eliminate them. Histamine is a chemical released to attempt and protect the immune system, but by the time the person has already had an allergic reaction, with symptoms such as nasal congestion, itching and sneezing, histamines are already present. Therefore, allergists recommend taking antihistamines before you know the time when your allergy symptoms appear.

    While antihistamines do assist with symptoms of sneezing and itchiness, they generally don’t assist with nasal stuffiness. Relieve your stuffiness with a nasal steroid spray along with the antihistamines.

  • Allergy shots are not considered the only long-term solution: Allergy shots or immunotherapy used to be the only successful long-term solution, but then sublingual tablets were introduced. These tablets dissolve under your tongue, and should be taken once-a-day before and during allergy season.

    These tablets purpose to desensitize your body to specific allergens by introducing them into your body in tiny amounts, and over time, your immune system builds up a tolerance to protect your body from these allergens, thus preventing symptoms. Taking the tablets is now considered more convenient than having to go to a doctor for weekly or monthly allergy shots. However, allergy shots are still a excellent option as well.

  • What you are allergic to can change over time: What you are allergic to can always change over time.

    Receiving allergy shots can make you develop immunity to a specific allergen that you were allergic to before. Allergies don’t vanish, but your body is always reacting differently depending on the environment you are in. Always get checked out by your allergist.

  • Allergies can cause asthma: Allergies are commonly linked to asthma, which numerous people don’t know.

    During allergy season, people are diagnosed with allergic asthma, and are often treated with steroid inhalers. Conversely, those with asthma will experience symptom flare-ups if allergies are not kept in check.

It’s time to put the distress of allergies behind you. Schedule an appointment with Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Associates of Tampa at one of our convenient Tampa Bay locations today, by calling (813) 971-9743, or use our online appointment request form.

Filed Under: Allergic Rhinitis, Allergy, Allergy Specialists, Allergy Tampa, AsthmaTagged With: allergies, Immune System, respiratory issues, Seasonal Allergies, symptoms, Treatment

Food Allergy

While an estimated 40 to 50 million Americans own allergies,

only 1 percent to 2 percent of every adults are allergic to foods or food additives.

Eight percent of children under age 6 own adverse reactions to ingested foods;

only 2 percent to 5 percent own confirmed food allergies.

The following

information addresses commonly asked questions regarding food allergy.

What if I Accidentally Eat a Food I’m Allergic to?

Individuals with food allergy should own a clearly defined plan of action for handling situations in which they accidentally ingest a food allergen. Own a list of symptoms and your doctor’s instructions for treatment posted in a prominent put in your kitchen. Oral antihistamines can be extremely useful in treating numerous of the early symptoms of a mild allergic reaction to a food.

Persons with histories of severe reactions need to be instructed in when and how to give themselves a shot of epinephrine (adrenaline) in the event of a severe allergic reaction.

This medication is available in easy-to-use injectable devices and should be carried by persons with histories of severe allergic reactions. You should be taken to the hospital or call 911 and arrange for follow-up medical care for a severe reaction. Bracelets or necklaces may be worn to quickly alert medical personnel or other caretakers about food allergies.

Once My Allergy Is Identified, How Is It Treated?

Once the diagnosis of food allergy is confirmed, the most effective treatment is not eating the offending food in any form. Therefore, the patient must be vigilant in checking ingredient labels of food products and learning other names of identification of the responsible food or food additive to make certain it is not present.

Allergies are a result of overreaction to what

When you eat in a restaurant, you must be particularly vigilant and you should take emergency medicines with you if you own a history of severe reactions. Waiters (and sometimes the kitchen chef) are not always aware of the exact ingredients of each item on the restaurant’s menu.

All patients with food allergies must make some changes in the foods they eat. Special food-allergy cookbooks, patient support groups and registered dietitians can provide valuable assistance regarding your diet. Your allergist can direct you to these resources.

Which Foods Are Most Likely To Cause Allergy?

Eggs, cows milk, peanuts, soy, wheat, tree nuts, fish and shellfish are the most common foods causing allergic reactions, but almost any food has the potential to trigger an allergy.

Foods most likely to cause anaphylaxis are peanuts, tree nuts and shellfish.

Keep in mind that, if you are allergic to a specific food, you might be allergic to related foods. For example, a person allergic to walnuts may also be allergic to pecans and persons allergic to shrimp may not tolerate crab and lobster. Likewise, a person allergic to peanuts may not tolerate one or two other members of the legume family, such as soy, peas or certain beans. Clinical research of individuals with food allergy, however, has demonstrated that the overwhelming majority of patients with food allergy are only allergic to one or two diverse foods.

Finish restriction of every foods in one botanical family based on an allergy to one of its members is rarely necessary. Discuss these issues with your allergist.

Why Me? Why Own I Developed Food Allergy?

Heredity seems to be the prime reason some people own allergies and others don’t. If both your parents own allergies, you own approximately a 75 percent chance of being allergic. If one parent is allergic, or you own relatives on one side with allergies, you own a 30 percent to 40 percent chance of developing some form of allergy.

If neither parent has apparent allergy, the chance is 10 percent to 15 percent.

Although food allergy occurs most often in infants and children, it can appear at any age and can be caused by foods that had been previously eaten without any problems. Finally, excessive exposure to a specific food may affect the overall rate of allergy to that food, as testified to by the high prevalence of fish allergy among Scandinavians and of rice allergy among the Japanese.

What Are Symptoms of Food Allergy?

Allergic reactions to foods typically start within minutes to a few hours after eating the offending food.

The frequency and severity of symptoms vary widely from one person to another. Mildly allergic persons may only suffer a runny nose with sneezing, while highly allergic persons may experience severe and life-threatening reactions, such as asthma or swelling of the tongue, lips or throat.

The most common symptoms of food allergy involve the skin and intestines. Skin rashes include hives and eczema. Intestinal symptoms typically include vomiting, nausea, stomach cramps, indigestion and diarrhea. Other symptoms can be asthma, with cough or wheezing; rhinitis, often including itchy, stuffy, runny nose and sneezing; and rarely, anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction that may be life threatening.
Because these symptoms can be caused by a number of diverse diseases other than food allergy, your allergist-immunologist may desire to examine you to law them out as the source of your problem.

How Do Special Diets Assist Pinpoint the Problem?

With the information gained from your history, physical exam and testing, your allergist may further narrow below the suspected foods by placing you on a special diet.

If your symptoms happen only occasionally, the culprit is likely a food that is eaten infrequently. Your allergist-immunologist may enquire you to hold a daily food diary listing every food and medication ingested, along with your symptoms for the day. By reviewing and comparing «good days» with «bad days», you and your allergist may be capable to determine which food is causing your reaction.

If only one or two foods seem to be causing allergic reactions, it may be necessary for the patient to go on a food elimination diet. The suspect food must be completely eliminated in any form for a short time — one to two weeks. If the allergic symptoms subside during abstinence and flare up when the food is ingested again, the likelihood of identifying the problem food can be increased.

If several foods appear to cause problems and/or the diagnosis of food allergy is equivocal, your allergist may desire to confirm the role of each suspected food by oral food challenge testing.

Not every positive skin tests and/or IgE blood tests equal a definite food allergy. With this in mind, food challenges are the best way to determine whether or not a food allergy really exists.

During an oral food challenge test the patient will eat or drink little portions of a suspected food in gradually increasing portions over a given period of time, generally under a physician’s supervision, to see if an allergic reaction occurs.

Will I Ever Be Capable To Eat These Foods Again?

In some cases, particularly in children, strict adherence to an elimination diet appears to promote the process of outgrowing a food allergy.

For example, the vast majority of patients with documented allergic reactions to eggs, cows milk and soy eventually become tolerant to these foods. Allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish, however, typically final a lifetime and are not outgrown. Overall, approximately one-third of children and adults will eventually be free of their allergic reactions to foods after rigorously following appropriate diets free of the offending food allergens.

After you own eliminated foods responsible for allergic reactions for a period of at least six months, your allergist may recommend that you undergo an oral food challenge under observation to reassess your symptoms.

If you own no reaction and can ingest a normally prepared portion of the food, you will be capable to safely reintroduce this food into your diet. If any symptoms of an allergic reaction do happen, the dietary restriction will need to be continued.

If you own had a severe immediate-type allergic reaction to a certain food, such as an anaphylactic reaction to peanuts, your allergist-immunologist may recommend that you never again eat this food and rarely would a food challenge be needed to confirm the history.

Remember, in some extremely allergic persons a extremely little quantity of an allergenic food can produce a life-threatening reaction.

Patients who use caution and carefully follow an allergist’s advice can bring food allergy under control. Please contact your allergist-immunologist with further questions and concerns about food allergy.

Download theFood Allergy Action Planand theSchool Medication Formif you need an updated one.

© Copyright 2000 American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

An allergy is a reaction the body has to a specific food or substance.

Allergies are extremely common.

They’re thought to affect more than 1 in 4 people in the UK at some point in their lives.

They’re particularly common in children. Some allergies go away as a kid gets older, although many are lifelong.

Adults can develop allergies to things they were not previously allergic to.

Having an allergy can be a nuisance and affect your everyday activities, but most allergic reactions are mild and can be largely kept under control.

Severe reactions can occasionally happen, but these are uncommon.

It’s time to put the distress of allergies behind you.

Schedule an appointment with Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Associates of Tampa at one of our convenient Tampa Bay locations today, by calling (813) 971-9743, or use our online appointment request form.

Filed Under: Allergic Rhinitis, Allergy, Allergy Specialists, Allergy Tampa, AsthmaTagged With: allergies, Immune System, respiratory issues, Seasonal Allergies, symptoms, Treatment

Food Allergy

While an estimated 40 to 50 million Americans own allergies,

only 1 percent to 2 percent of every adults are allergic to foods or food additives.

Eight percent of children under age 6 own adverse reactions to ingested foods;

only 2 percent to 5 percent own confirmed food allergies.

The following

information addresses commonly asked questions regarding food allergy.

What if I Accidentally Eat a Food I’m Allergic to?

Individuals with food allergy should own a clearly defined plan of action for handling situations in which they accidentally ingest a food allergen. Own a list of symptoms and your doctor’s instructions for treatment posted in a prominent put in your kitchen. Oral antihistamines can be extremely useful in treating numerous of the early symptoms of a mild allergic reaction to a food.

Persons with histories of severe reactions need to be instructed in when and how to give themselves a shot of epinephrine (adrenaline) in the event of a severe allergic reaction.

This medication is available in easy-to-use injectable devices and should be carried by persons with histories of severe allergic reactions. You should be taken to the hospital or call 911 and arrange for follow-up medical care for a severe reaction. Bracelets or necklaces may be worn to quickly alert medical personnel or other caretakers about food allergies.

Once My Allergy Is Identified, How Is It Treated?

Once the diagnosis of food allergy is confirmed, the most effective treatment is not eating the offending food in any form.

Therefore, the patient must be vigilant in checking ingredient labels of food products and learning other names of identification of the responsible food or food additive to make certain it is not present. When you eat in a restaurant, you must be particularly vigilant and you should take emergency medicines with you if you own a history of severe reactions. Waiters (and sometimes the kitchen chef) are not always aware of the exact ingredients of each item on the restaurant’s menu.

All patients with food allergies must make some changes in the foods they eat. Special food-allergy cookbooks, patient support groups and registered dietitians can provide valuable assistance regarding your diet.

Your allergist can direct you to these resources.

Which Foods Are Most Likely To Cause Allergy?

Eggs, cows milk, peanuts, soy, wheat, tree nuts, fish and shellfish are the most common foods causing allergic reactions, but almost any food has the potential to trigger an allergy. Foods most likely to cause anaphylaxis are peanuts, tree nuts and shellfish.

Keep in mind that, if you are allergic to a specific food, you might be allergic to related foods.

For example, a person allergic to walnuts may also be allergic to pecans and persons allergic to shrimp may not tolerate crab and lobster. Likewise, a person allergic to peanuts may not tolerate one or two other members of the legume family, such as soy, peas or certain beans. Clinical research of individuals with food allergy, however, has demonstrated that the overwhelming majority of patients with food allergy are only allergic to one or two diverse foods. Finish restriction of every foods in one botanical family based on an allergy to one of its members is rarely necessary.

Discuss these issues with your allergist.

Why Me? Why Own I Developed Food Allergy?

Heredity seems to be the prime reason some people own allergies and others don’t. If both your parents own allergies, you own approximately a 75 percent chance of being allergic. If one parent is allergic, or you own relatives on one side with allergies, you own a 30 percent to 40 percent chance of developing some form of allergy. If neither parent has apparent allergy, the chance is 10 percent to 15 percent.

Although food allergy occurs most often in infants and children, it can appear at any age and can be caused by foods that had been previously eaten without any problems.

Finally, excessive exposure to a specific food may affect the overall rate of allergy to that food, as testified to by the high prevalence of fish allergy among Scandinavians and of rice allergy among the Japanese.

What Are Symptoms of Food Allergy?

Allergic reactions to foods typically start within minutes to a few hours after eating the offending food. The frequency and severity of symptoms vary widely from one person to another.

Mildly allergic persons may only suffer a runny nose with sneezing, while highly allergic persons may experience severe and life-threatening reactions, such as asthma or swelling of the tongue, lips or throat.

The most common symptoms of food allergy involve the skin and intestines. Skin rashes include hives and eczema. Intestinal symptoms typically include vomiting, nausea, stomach cramps, indigestion and diarrhea. Other symptoms can be asthma, with cough or wheezing; rhinitis, often including itchy, stuffy, runny nose and sneezing; and rarely, anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction that may be life threatening.
Because these symptoms can be caused by a number of diverse diseases other than food allergy, your allergist-immunologist may desire to examine you to law them out as the source of your problem.

How Do Special Diets Assist Pinpoint the Problem?

With the information gained from your history, physical exam and testing, your allergist may further narrow below the suspected foods by placing you on a special diet.

If your symptoms happen only occasionally, the culprit is likely a food that is eaten infrequently. Your allergist-immunologist may enquire you to hold a daily food diary listing every food and medication ingested, along with your symptoms for the day. By reviewing and comparing «good days» with «bad days», you and your allergist may be capable to determine which food is causing your reaction.

If only one or two foods seem to be causing allergic reactions, it may be necessary for the patient to go on a food elimination diet.

The suspect food must be completely eliminated in any form for a short time — one to two weeks. If the allergic symptoms subside during abstinence and flare up when the food is ingested again, the likelihood of identifying the problem food can be increased.

If several foods appear to cause problems and/or the diagnosis of food allergy is equivocal, your allergist may desire to confirm the role of each suspected food by oral food challenge testing.

Not every positive skin tests and/or IgE blood tests equal a definite food allergy. With this in mind, food challenges are the best way to determine whether or not a food allergy really exists.

During an oral food challenge test the patient will eat or drink little portions of a suspected food in gradually increasing portions over a given period of time, generally under a physician’s supervision, to see if an allergic reaction occurs.

Will I Ever Be Capable To Eat These Foods Again?

In some cases, particularly in children, strict adherence to an elimination diet appears to promote the process of outgrowing a food allergy.

For example, the vast majority of patients with documented allergic reactions to eggs, cows milk and soy eventually become tolerant to these foods. Allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish, however, typically final a lifetime and are not outgrown. Overall, approximately one-third of children and adults will eventually be free of their allergic reactions to foods after rigorously following appropriate diets free of the offending food allergens.

After you own eliminated foods responsible for allergic reactions for a period of at least six months, your allergist may recommend that you undergo an oral food challenge under observation to reassess your symptoms.

If you own no reaction and can ingest a normally prepared portion of the food, you will be capable to safely reintroduce this food into your diet. If any symptoms of an allergic reaction do happen, the dietary restriction will need to be continued.

If you own had a severe immediate-type allergic reaction to a certain food, such as an anaphylactic reaction to peanuts, your allergist-immunologist may recommend that you never again eat this food and rarely would a food challenge be needed to confirm the history. Remember, in some extremely allergic persons a extremely little quantity of an allergenic food can produce a life-threatening reaction.

Patients who use caution and carefully follow an allergist’s advice can bring food allergy under control.

Please contact your allergist-immunologist with further questions and concerns about food allergy.

Download theFood Allergy Action Planand theSchool Medication Formif you need an updated one.

© Copyright 2000 American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

An allergy is a reaction the body has to a specific food or substance.

Allergies are extremely common. They’re thought to affect more than 1 in 4 people in the UK at some point in their lives.

They’re particularly common in children. Some allergies go away as a kid gets older, although many are lifelong.

Adults can develop allergies to things they were not previously allergic to.

Having an allergy can be a nuisance and affect your everyday activities, but most allergic reactions are mild and can be largely kept under control.

Severe reactions can occasionally happen, but these are uncommon.


Common allergies

Substances that cause allergic reactions are called allergens.

The more common allergens include:

  1. insect bites and stings
  2. dust mites
  3. latex – used to make some gloves and condoms
  4. food – particularly nuts, fruit, shellfish, eggs and cows’ milk
  5. grass and tree pollen – an allergy to these is known as hay fever (allergic rhinitis)
  6. mould – these can release little particles into the air that you can breathe in
  7. medicines – including ibuprofen, aspirin and certain antibiotics
  8. animal dander, tiny flakes of skin or hair
  9. household chemicals – including those in detergents and hair dyes

Most of these allergens are generally harmless to people who are not allergic to them.


How to manage an allergy

In many cases, the most effective way of managing an allergy is to avoid the allergen that causes the reaction whenever possible.

For example, if you own a food allergy, you should check a food’s ingredients list for allergens before eating it.

There are also several medicines available to help control symptoms of allergic reactions, including:

  1. decongestants – tablets, capsules, nasal sprays or liquids that can be used as a short-term treatment for a blocked nose
  2. antihistamines – these can be taken when you notice the symptoms of a reaction, or before being exposed to an allergen, to stop a reaction occurring
  3. lotions and creams, such as moisturising creams (emollients) – these can reduce skin redness and itchiness
  4. steroid medicines – sprays, drops, creams, inhalers and tablets that can assist reduce redness and swelling caused by an allergic reaction

For some people with extremely severe allergies, a treatment called immunotherapy may be recommended.

This involves being exposed to the allergen in a controlled way over a number of years so your body gets used to it and does not react to it so severely.


Getting assist for allergies

See a GP if you ponder you or your kid might own had an allergic reaction to something.

The symptoms of an allergic reaction can also be caused by other conditions.

A GP can assist determine whether it’s likely you own an allergy.

If they ponder you might own a mild allergy, they can offer advice and treatment to assist manage the condition.

If your allergy is particularly severe or it’s not clear what you’re allergic to, they may refer you to an allergy specialist for testing and advice about treatment.

Find out more about allergy testing


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